Treatment of liberal causes célèbre vs emigrants

Notachipanoaktree

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Look in the mirror, sir.

The caps seems to fit rather well,, but if sir would like to try another size?
Look to yourself sister. I ....react. I believe it's the polite thing to do.

If you want a conversation then let's discuss. If you want an argument then let's argue. If you want a row then let's row. If you want a shouting match then lets shout. If you want abuse then lets abuse.

But please! none of this two-faced, hot and cold, aggressive then timid, Woman then Lesbian, Man then Woman, BS. Please!

Put your cards honestly on the table and let's do this.


 
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Schuhart

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The poorest parts of the country remain overwhelmingly affected by this phenomenon, in my home parish 13 of 19 of my 6th class group have had to leave for economic reasons, but no influential personage has taken up our cause. And it’s not just recent generations that have emigrated, every family input locality has elderly relations who were forced out in the 40s and 50s. We comprise a good percentage of citizens born since the inception of the state but no government or mass movement has ever attempted to do anything for emigrants. Indeed the recent influx of immigration seems aimed at replacing us. My question is why do other minority groups get such offical recognition while we are left to survive on our wits?
This has actually been a dominant theme in Irish politics since the foundation of the State.

You'd do better to ask why, despite its deep grip on politics, the rural agenda has failed to make any progress.

As to this experience being 'minority', the equivalent of 80% of people born in the 1930s emigrated in the 1950s.

I find it significant that we could have come through decades where the central concerns of our politics are only explicable if seen as grounded in a fixation with rural depopulation, and none of that intrudes on how you frame your OP.

The direct answer to your question can be found on another thread.
http://www.politics.ie/forum/environment/253481-regional-cities-focus-growth-12.html

The reason many have to leave Ireland from rural areas is because rural Ireland has made a political choice that they would rather go to London than to Galway City.
 

Notachipanoaktree

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This has actually been a dominant theme in Irish politics since the foundation of the State.

You'd do better to ask why, despite its deep grip on politics, the rural agenda has failed to make any progress.

As to this experience being 'minority', the equivalent of 80% of people born in the 1930s emigrated in the 1950s.

I find it significant that we could have come through decades where the central concerns of our politics are only explicable if seen as grounded in a fixation with rural depopulation, and none of that intrudes on how you frame your OP.

The direct answer to your question can be found on another thread.
http://www.politics.ie/forum/environment/253481-regional-cities-focus-growth-12.html

The reason many have to leave Ireland from rural areas is because rural Ireland has made a political choice that they would rather go to London than to Galway City.
Why the hell do you think this is confined to the country. FCS it's nationwide, in every city, town, and townland. Who let 1,000,000 starve to death in the lanes and ditches in 1847.
 

CatullusV

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Look to yourself sister. I ....react. I believe it's the polite thing to do.

If you want a conversation then let's discuss. If you want an argument then let's argue. If you want a row then let's row. If you want a shouting match then lets shout. If you want abuse then lets abuse.

But please! none of this two-faced, hot and cold, aggressive then timid, Woman then Lesbian, Man then Woman, BS. Please!

Put your cards honestly on the table and let's do this.


You're such a lost cause. I explicitly invited debate; you jumped in with your usual oul' sh1te. It's all on the record.
 

CatullusV

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This has actually been a dominant theme in Irish politics since the foundation of the State.

You'd do better to ask why, despite its deep grip on politics, the rural agenda has failed to make any progress.

As to this experience being 'minority', the equivalent of 80% of people born in the 1930s emigrated in the 1950s.

I find it significant that we could have come through decades where the central concerns of our politics are only explicable if seen as grounded in a fixation with rural depopulation, and none of that intrudes on how you frame your OP.

The direct answer to your question can be found on another thread.
http://www.politics.ie/forum/environment/253481-regional-cities-focus-growth-12.html

The reason many have to leave Ireland from rural areas is because rural Ireland has made a political choice that they would rather go to London than to Galway City.
The "equivalent of 80%"? What de fupp does that mean? Please explain and use some stats.
 

brigg

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Why do you think you are being "replaced" on purpose?
Why don't you stay and fight for your place in the country?
Those who left did not fight- they just left.
Naturally others will step into vacancies if they arise- and try to survive in their newly found niche.
It is nonsense to fabulate about replacement.
A refreshing attitude.
There is a long tradition in this country, especially in counties like Donegal, where emigrating to America (often illegally) is considered the done thing, but there seems to be no desire to move to another Irish county, or the closest large town.
Dublin might as well be Timbuktu, while America is literally considered the next parish.
 

Rural

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We live on a little island in the Atlantic, it's important for people (especially those in rural areas) to travel off island for a while, it's also important that other cultures immigrate to our little island.

Keeps us from getting stale and mouldy.:)
 

GDPR

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We live on a little island in the Atlantic, it's important for people (especially those in rural areas) to travel off island for a while, it's also important that other cultures immigrate to our little island.

Keeps us from getting stale and mouldy.:)


Everything that has improved in Ireland, on both sides of the Border, in my lifetime has been a direct result of "opening up".
 

Lagertha

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I did my leaving cert in 1991, there wasn't enough money to send me to university, there was a recession and basically, as much as I'd have loved to go, financially it just wasn't an option. I could have gone on the dole but I didn't, I took low paid jobs that I'd have preferred not to have to do, but I had money in my pocket, I could pay my way at home and provide for myself, which is a damned site more than your average 18 year old is doing in Ireland now.

Immigrants move to a country and they do the jobs that the indigenous population won't do. They'll work in the shops, and hotels and bars and do cleaning work that a lot of natives feel they're too good for, too good for but not proud enough to get off their lazy arses and get a job though. Too easy to collect 200 euro a week and have your rent paid.
 

Hitchcock

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??
When was the last time you were served by an indigenous waitress in one of the biggish cities here?
About three weeks ago. There is a significant number of non Irish labour in the service sector but how do you conclusively determine that to be discrimination? I'd suggest the make up of the service sector is also female is that discrimination too? It would seem to me that it's more likely to do with wages and conditions than discrimination but I'll await you to actually make an argument.
 

owedtojoy

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Yesterday, 60,000 took to the streets to celebrate the Gay Pride festival, with dignitaries from many state institutions as well as the ‘great and good’ taking part in the festivities. The progress made in social mores is a credit to the country, however probably the largest minority of Irish citizens remain an ignored and disregarded segment of the population. I’m referring of course to economic emigrants, of which I’m one. The poorest parts of the country remain overwhelmingly affected by this phenomenon, in my home parish 13 of 19 of my 6th class group have had to leave for economic reasons, but no influential personage has taken up our cause. And it’s not just recent generations that have emigrated, every family input locality has elderly relations who were forced out in the 40s and 50s. We comprise a good percentage of citizens born since the inception of the state but no government or mass movement has ever attempted to do anything for emigrants. Indeed the recent influx of immigration seems aimed at replacing us. My question is why do other minority groups get such offical recognition while we are left to survive on our wits?
Who are "we"?

Most of my 6th Class group emigrated - when we had a reunion recently, about 50% were living in the UK, and had to travel here.

Of my Leaving Cert cohort, the vast majority are still in Ireland.

There is a skills shortage in the country for IT jobs, and some others. Maybe you should start job hunting here with regard to a move?

If you have the right skills there is a job here for you. Sh!t happens, but the wheel turns.
 

Schuhart

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The "equivalent of 80%"? What de fupp does that mean? Please explain and use some stats.
Bottle fed, I see.

Irish emigration in the 1950s – Enda Hargaden

"In summary, the statement that four out of every five children born in Ireland between 1931 and 1941 emigrated in the 1950s is incorrect. What is true is that around 57,000 were born each year in the 1930s, and around 45,000 people (i.e. about 80% of 57,000) emigrated each year in the 1950s. The starkness of that statistic doesn’t require any exaggeration."

Like, is it controversial to say emigration has been traditionally high?
 

Fritzbox

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You'd do better to ask why, despite its deep grip on politics, the rural agenda has failed to make any progress.
You think the rural 'agenda' has failed to make any progress, really? Well you're wrong. Conditions in rural Ireland are ten times better than they were at the foundation of the state.
 

GDPR

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What do you guys want?

Stop farting round pretending because a Latvian girl serves you coffee in a cafe, your life has been upended.
 

jmcc

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Most of my 6th Class group emigrated - when we had a reunion recently, about 50% were living in the UK, and had to travel here.

Of my Leaving Cert cohort, the vast majority are still in Ireland.
So what size was your "Leaving Cert cohort"? How "vast" was that vast in "vast majority"?
 

Schuhart

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You think the rural 'agenda' has failed to make any progress, really? Well you're wrong. Conditions in rural Ireland are ten times better than they were at the foundation of the state.
I'm intrigued.

Do elaborate.
 


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