Trouble down on the Farm: IFA call for more workers from outside of the EEA!

Catalpast

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The IFA have today called for the availability of employment farmers from outside the European Economic Area. This is to help meet labour and skills shortages currently on Irish farms.

The IFA recently submitted a study showing a shortage of skilled and general labour supply in the agriculture sector over the past couple of years. This was submitted to a Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation review. This had led to a proposal from the IFA to extend employment permits to farm workers from outside the European economic area to help fill these shortages

Employment Permits needed to solve labour shortages. | THATSFARMING.COM

Yes folks there is a huge crises in Irish Farming [apparently]

Seems the supply of cheap labour from inside the EU has now dried up

Perhaps foreign workers who have moved here in droves since we opened up our labour market in 2004 to the NAS States

- have finally had enough of being milked by the unscrupulous?

Seems we cant get enough rural workers in Ireland or the wider EU to fill the demand!

Even though the EU has a population north of 500 million people that is still not a wide enough pool of employment it seems

Now the IFA want more workers coming in from even cheaper locations

I expect they will work for even less

- no questions asked

Slurry Pit Economics

- resting on a bottomless pool.......... :?
 


silverharp

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ah bejaysus, suuure it would be a great business if the labour was free, is there a grant for that?
 

Mad as Fish

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As much as I have defended farmers in the past this is total BS. They just want cheap young lads who'll work all hours for feck all pay.

The only sign of scarcity I have seen is in the dairy sector for milkers, one of the jobs, BTW, that can be fully automated.
 

gijoe

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'Labour shortages' these days is really code not for a lack of labour supply but instead a labour supply at the floor minimum wage levels.
 

Barroso

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The IFA have today called for the availability of employment farmers from outside the European Economic Area. This is to help meet labour and skills shortages currently on Irish farms.

The IFA recently submitted a study showing a shortage of skilled and general labour supply in the agriculture sector over the past couple of years. This was submitted to a Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation review. This had led to a proposal from the IFA to extend employment permits to farm workers from outside the European economic area to help fill these shortages

Employment Permits needed to solve labour shortages. | THATSFARMING.COM

Yes folks there is a huge crises in Irish Farming [apparently]

Seems the supply of cheap labour from inside the EU has now dried up

Perhaps foreign workers who have moved here in droves since we opened up our labour market in 2004 to the NAS States

- have finally had enough of being milked by the unscrupulous?

Seems we cant get enough rural workers in Ireland or the wider EU to fill the demand!

Even though the EU has a population north of 500 million people that is still not a wide enough pool of employment it seems

Now the IFA want more workers coming in from even cheaper locations

I expect they will work for even less

- no questions asked

Slurry Pit Economics

- resting on a bottomless pool.......... :?
Has anyone asked Simon Coveney what his opinion is on this matter?
 

Mad as Fish

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Lets take a look at the classifieds section of Ireland's leading agricultural publication -

Farm Jobs Ireland | Faming Jobs Ireland | Farm Jobs | Toplink

Outside of the dairy sector there is exactly one employer who has placed an advert for full time farm staff over the past week, and this is at the height of the silage season with the cereal harvest starting in a month or so. There is one part time GFW and a FT pig herdsman required, and that's it.
 

farnaby

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Skilled labour shortages I can understand - I met an Australian farmer who travelled to Ukraine to bring skilled seasonal workers back.

General labour shortages - not so much.
 

'orebel

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Lets take a look at the classifieds section of Ireland's leading agricultural publication -

Farm Jobs Ireland | Faming Jobs Ireland | Farm Jobs | Toplink

Outside of the dairy sector there is exactly one employer who has placed an advert for full time farm staff over the past week, and this is at the height of the silage season with the cereal harvest starting in a month or so. There is one part time GFW and a FT pig herdsman required, and that's it.
What's the pay scale?
 

Mad as Fish

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Skilled labour shortages I can understand - I met an Australian farmer who travelled to Ukraine to bring skilled seasonal workers back.

General labour shortages - not so much.
A major problem is that farm work has become ever more seasonal and so workers are required for shorter periods. This does not encourage farmers to train or retain staff who will keep the skills available to the farming industry. There are also fewer required. A hundred acres of silage is now an afternoon's work, twenty years ago it was several days.
 

SamsonS

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As someone who comments regularly on employment/unemployment, the available stats would not back up either lack of workers, lack of workers in rural Ireland, or any evidence that the agricultural worker supply has evaporated in Ireland.

Firstly the labour force is still 100k shy of its 2007/8 peak.
At end of 2016 we had 173k people seeking work, and another 30k who were close to re-joining labour market.
At end 2016 110k working in Agriculture, which was the same as worked in it in 2007, and only a little shy of its 2008 peak.
 

Mad as Fish

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What's the pay scale?
Usually minimum wage or therabouts for GFW, but you'll never see the figures published or discussed much. Lads driving the bigger machines will get a bit more as will herdsmen on the larger farms, but nobody is getting rich.
 

SamsonS

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A major problem is that farm work has become ever more seasonal and so workers are required for shorter periods. This does not encourage farmers to train or retain staff who will keep the skills available to the farming industry. There are also fewer required. A hundred acres of silage is now an afternoon's work, twenty years ago it was several days.
Contradict my stats, but is the changing nature of family size, and the increasing farm size having an impact? As in work that was previously done by wives/sons/daughters , now falling on farmer to do, and that it makes more sense to pay min wage to get this done ?
 

Mad as Fish

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As someone who comments regularly on employment/unemployment, the available stats would not back up either lack of workers, lack of workers in rural Ireland, or any evidence that the agricultural worker supply has evaporated in Ireland.

Firstly the labour force is still 100k shy of its 2007/8 peak.
At end of 2016 we had 173k people seeking work, and another 30k who were close to re-joining labour market.
At end 2016 110k working in Agriculture, which was the same as worked in it in 2007, and only a little shy of its 2008 peak.
We must not discount the fact that a claimed labour shortage makes the government look good, and the IFA would be keen to curry government favour after last years salary scandals.
 

'orebel

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Usually minimum wage or therabouts for GFW, but you'll never see the figures published or discussed much. Lads driving the bigger machines will get a bit more as will herdsmen on the larger farms, but nobody is getting rich.
Er. I know. The question was rhetorical. ;)
 

Mad as Fish

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Contradict my stats, but is the changing nature of family size, and the increasing farm size having an impact? As in work that was previously done by wives/sons/daughters , now falling on farmer to do, and that it makes more sense to pay min wage to get this done ?
An interesting question and I wouldn't have any immediate answers. Where extra labour is required contractors are often brought in, this is certainly the case with silage where farm labour is hardly used at all in many instances. Other tasks such as feeding are also far more efficiently carried out with complete diet feeders and so on, and even that may be automated to a great degree. I am not so familiar with the tillage sector but contractors can again relieve farmers of much of the work at a lower cost than having to buy and maintain all the equipment themselves, so greater mechanisation (bigger tractors) has certainly reduced the need for on farm labour.
 

good dog

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Farmers have historically expected cheap labour along with their grants. Now they are looking for labour saving investment grants to reduce their need for cheap labour. One time they had industrial school boys to work cheaply. Governments have traditionally supported them in getting free money and cheap labour. Some councillor even proposed giving them the unmarried mothers for a nominal fee when they couldn't get cheap servants.

https://mobile.twitter.com/Limerick1914/status/472766416853032960/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fstorify.com%2FLimerick1914%2Fchildren-s-home-in-tuam-1920s-1960s
 

Mad as Fish

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