Truck wrecks DART wires at Merrion Gates - Irish Rail irked



Roll_On

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So who's paying for the damage? taxpayers of course. No personal responsibility in this country.
 

Mushroom

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I wouldn't imagine that the judge involved is a regular DART commuter:


"FINE GAEL councillor Alan Mitchell was among the solicitors appointed to the District Court yesterday, when 12 new District and Circuit Court judges were nominated by the Government.

Mr Mitchell was the Fine Gael group leader on Longford County Council and Longford Town Council until yesterday, when he delivered his letters of resignation to the councils.

A representative on Longford County Council since 1999, he assisted with the general election campaign of Fine Gael’s Longford-based TD James Bannon. He is behind the firm Alan Mitchell Co Solicitors, Main Street, Longford."

Government appoints 12 new judges to courts - The Irish Times - Wed, Mar 14, 2012
 

Mushroom

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Toland

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McDave

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(If guilty) he should be made cover the cost of repair, he should be jailed (14 days) for leaving the scene, and he should never be allowed behind the wheel of a vehicle again. IMO, that's about the level of penalty that should be imposed by any functioning society for such wilful negligence.
DART out of action for a day and a half. The guy effectively gets a fools pardon. Typical lame response from an impotent Irish criminal justice system.
 

borntorum

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Pretty lenient sentence, I agree. There's a huge lack of consistency, particularly in the District Court. Having said that, he did plead guilty and had no previous. They're important mitigating factors.
 

CookieMonster

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Some moron of a truck driver has driven through the Merrion Gates with a lifting arm up and has caused 'major' damage to the overhead wires. Trains on the southside are down until 6pm at least.

I can't remember seeing a press release quite like this one before (from irishrail.ie)



Prosecution? This retard deserves shooting
Irish rail do good communications. Their twitter feed is often good humoured as well as informative.

Well it was when I used to follow it, I don't know if it's the same any more.
 

McDave

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Pretty lenient sentence, I agree. There's a huge lack of consistency, particularly in the District Court. Having said that, he did plead guilty and had no previous. They're important mitigating factors.
There is mitigation. But sob stories about personal circumstances shouldn't cut much mustard. There should be a heavy financial penalty and a long driving ban. There's too much insouciant carelessness laughed off in Irish society.
 

borntorum

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There is mitigation. But sob stories about personal circumstances shouldn't cut much mustard. There should be a heavy financial penalty and a long driving ban. There's too much insouciant carelessness laughed off in Irish society.
Personally I wouldn't have much interest in sob stories. We all have sh1t to deal with, it doesn't excuse criminal actions (I'm saying this as a civilian, not a lawyer!).

But pleading guilty and no previous is significant. The courts, rightly IMO, will tend to give people a second chance, especially when they put their hands up and admit culpability.
 

McDave

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Question here about Judges...surely they can't at the waive of a freekin hand lump a 500k euro bill on the taxpayer ?
That's the whole point. There's no real penalty being imposed on an act of gross negligence. The judge seems to think it's a pretty victimless crime. To me that's monumental complacency which does nothing to correct bad behaviour.
 

Mushroom

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Question here about Judges...surely they can't at the waive of a freekin hand lump a 500k euro bill on the taxpayer?
The case was in the District Court (i.e. small beer) and Cosgrove was prosecuted for careless driving and failing to remain at the scene of an accident. So it had nothing to do with the question of liability or damages. I assume that matter is between Cosgrove's insurers and Irish Rail.
 

Roman Emperor

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...But pleading guilty and no previous is significant. The courts, rightly IMO, will tend to give people a second chance, especially when they put their hands up and admit culpability.
I guess after pulling down the overhead wires he had little option other than to plead guilty.At
the same time,are we not being a little harsh on this individual? After all,one presumes he didn't do it deliberately. Being human,the sad fact is that all of us are prone to lapses of concentration and errors of judgment. It happens to us all at some stage and most of the time we are just lucky enough to get away with it.
 

borntorum

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I guess after pulling down the overhead wires he had little option other than to plead guilty.At
the same time,are we not being a little harsh on this individual? After all,one presumes he didn't do it deliberately. Being human,the sad fact is that all of us are prone to lapses of concentration and errors of judgment. It happens to us all at some stage and most of the time we are just lucky enough to get away with it.
Which is why the lack of previous convictions was important.
 

Roman Emperor

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Which is why the lack of previous convictions was important.
I agree. I think the judge was very fair. BTW, incidents such as this are very common. In the course of my work hardly a week passes without something like this happening. As late as yesterday (Friday) I saw the aftermath of two utility poles and 400m of overhead cable pulled down. It's a regular occurrence and it's not always the fault of the driver involved.
 

Al.

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I agree. I think the judge was very fair. BTW, incidents such as this are very common. In the course of my work hardly a week passes without something like this happening. As late as yesterday (Friday) I saw the aftermath of two utility poles and 400m of overhead cable pulled down. It's a regular occurrence and it's not always the fault of the driver involved.
How is it not the driver's fault? Did the utility poles jump off the footpath and onto the road in front of him? The utility poles didn't follow the Safe Cross Code?
 


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