Trump serious about deporting the undocumented Irish?

Cruimh

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IrishCentral is shocked at the arrest and likely deportation of an illegal Immigrant, a "Top Irish Community Leader in Boston".

Trump officials to deport top Irish community leader in Boston as crackdown continues

A leading Irish figure in the Boston community has been arrested and held for deportation in a move that has shocked the Irish community in the city and prompted renewed fears that President Donald Trump’s administration is determined to deport as many undocumented as possible.


John Cunningham, 38, the former chairman of the Boston Northeast GAA, was arrested at his home in the city last Friday by immigration officials.


Cunningham, a native of Glencolmcille, Co. Donegal, has been living in the U.S. since 1999 and has not been back in Ireland in 16 years. He was prominently featured in an RTÉ program called “The Undocumented” in March when he discussed living as an undocumented resident.


Cunningham was arrested for “immigration violations,” a spokesperson for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) told The Irish Times.


He entered the country lawfully under the visa waiver program, but failed to depart in compliance with the terms of the waiver.
Seems fair enough to me - he entered legally but then chose to stay on illegally. Taking part in the RTE program might not have been the best move for him. Should the "undocumented" Irish (euphemism for illegal immigrants) get special treatment compared to other "undocumented" people?


<Mod> This thread has been merged with "Trump deports an illegal/undocumented Irish immigrant - is that a good thing?" </Mod>
 
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A Voice

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IrishCentral is shocked at the arrest and likely deportation of an illegal Immigrant, a "Top Irish Community Leader in Boston".

Trump officials to deport top Irish community leader in Boston as crackdown continues



Seems fair enough to me - he entered legally but then chose to stay on illegally. Taking part in the RTE program might not have been the best move for him. Should the "undocumented" Irish (euphemism for illegal immigrants) get special treatment compared to other "undocumented" people?
Understatement of the year! He was directly challenging the US. What did he expect?
 

PBP voter

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The US bring this all on themselves.

They need major reform ASAP.

I have no real sympathy for people who don't go through the correct procedures. That said the US needs a lot of these immigrants so they need a sensible solution.

Trump will find it difficult to beat Obama's record. He was great on sending back illegals.

Barack Obama: The deporter-in-chief | USA | Al Jazeera
 

razorblade

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Btw can we stop being pc and saying undocumented, the term is called illegal lets stick to that.
 

Apple in Eden

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If they're illegal they should be deported Irish or not.
Your right Blade fair is fair. I don't have a lot of sympathy for these guys rules are rules if you get caught tough luck.
Was there myself once many moons ago and overstayed my visa for a relatively short period but made the rational decision for me to come back home. Different folks view this another way but you can't just demand an amnesty by virtue of the fact that you have hidden in the shadows for 10 or 15 years. Why have an immigration system at all?
 

ruserious

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When the Irish government cries foul at the plight of illegal Irish in America, they leave themselves open with regards to our illegal population here and the complete refusal to deal with them.

Best say nothing at all.
 

Quebecoise

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People don't seem to understand American political culture. There's a strong libertarian streak in American culture which always sees the government as the bad guy. Any interference by the government in how people want to run their business (including employing illegals) is strongly resisted by many Americans.

Very easy to get cash in hand work in the States, people don't believe in paying taxes to the government. There are parts of New Jersey for example where most of the neighbourhood is full of illegals, all running small businesses as painter and decorators, taxi drivers, bus drivers, plumbers, you name it. And Americans prefer paying cash and avoid paying taxes to big brother.

Contrast that with Canada where cash in hand, under the table work is much harder to come by and the national motto is 'Peace, order and good government'. Unlike Americans, Canadians believe that government can have a positive role to play in people's lives and because of that people sholuld respect its mandate to collect taxes and provide for its people.

The thing with the U.S. is that it is going to be very difficult to get rid of all the millions of undocumented workers because you would have to introduce a soviet-like survaillance society where all businesses would have to be personally checked to see that they were not employing illegals. Americans would never stand for that kind of government interference in their businesses. Added to that, the government would have to massively increase the amount of its employees to try and find all of these illegals, increasing the government tax burden in order to decrease the amount of people at the bottom of the labour market who do all the jobs that Americans don't want to do. The libertarians in the Republican party, along with the left in the Democratic party would lose their collective shhit.
 

Dame_Enda

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There seems to be an attempt by commentators to do away with immigration controls of any kind through pushing an amnesty agenda.
 

mr_anderson

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GDPR

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People don't seem to understand American political culture. There's a strong libertarian streak in American culture which always sees the government as the bad guy. Any interference by the government in how people want to run their business (including employing illegals) is strongly resisted by many Americans.

Very easy to get cash in hand work in the States, people don't believe in paying the government taxes. There are parts of New Jersey for example where most of the neighbourhood is full of illegals, all running small businesses as painter and decorators, taxi drivers, bus drivers, plumbers, you name it. And Americans prefer paying cash and avoid paying taxes to big brother.

Contrast that with Canada where cash in hand under the table work is much harder to come by and the national motto is 'Peace, order and good government'. Unlike Americans, Canadians believe that government can have a positive role to play in people's lives and because of that people sholuld respect its mandate to collect taxes and provide for its people.

The thing with the U.S. is that it is going to be very difficult to get rid of all the millions of undocumented workers because you would have to introduce a soviet-like survaillance society where all businesses would have to be personally checked to see that they were not employing illegals. Americans would never stand for that kind of government interference in their businesses. Added to that, the government would have to massively increase the amount of its employees to try and find all of these illegals, increasing the government tax burden in order to decrease the amount of people at the bottom of the labour market who do all the jobs that Americans don't want to do. The libertarians woukd lose their collective shhit.
Good post. The US has no historical commitment, except in very restricted terms and for a relatively short duration, to a closed border policy. The country could not function if it chose to impose a NZ/Australian style points scheme for entry, or crack down on illegals, nor would there be widespread support for such a move. In general, they resolve hang overs with periodic amnesties.

There is also a cultural rejection of the concept of sealing off the US. Part of Americas self-image is that it is so attractive a destination, folk crawl through the desert or stow away on ships to reach the Golden Shore. The idea that immigrants have risked and fought to get there is important to them.
 

Roberto Jordan

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People don't seem to understand American political culture. There's a strong libertarian streak in American culture which always sees the government as the bad guy. Any interference by the government in how people want to run their business (including employing illegals) is strongly resisted by many Americans.

Very easy to get cash in hand work in the States, people don't believe in paying taxes to the government. There are parts of New Jersey for example where most of the neighbourhood is full of illegals, all running small businesses as painter and decorators, taxi drivers, bus drivers, plumbers, you name it. And Americans prefer paying cash and avoid paying taxes to big brother.

Contrast that with Canada where cash in hand, under the table work is much harder to come by and the national motto is 'Peace, order and good government'. Unlike Americans, Canadians believe that government can have a positive role to play in people's lives and because of that people sholuld respect its mandate to collect taxes and provide for its people.

The thing with the U.S. is that it is going to be very difficult to get rid of all the millions of undocumented workers because you would have to introduce a soviet-like survaillance society where all businesses would have to be personally checked to see that they were not employing illegals. Americans would never stand for that kind of government interference in their businesses. Added to that, the government would have to massively increase the amount of its employees to try and find all of these illegals, increasing the government tax burden in order to decrease the amount of people at the bottom of the labour market who do all the jobs that Americans don't want to do. The libertarians in the Republican party, along with the left in the Democratic party would lose their collective shhit.
I would disagree about the extent to which black economy is a driver of long term stay-ons in the Irish community.

in the north eastern US , aside from guys doing laboring or skilled work on non-union jobs , many of the Irish are employed in fully tax compliant roles and/or own & run businesses that are fully up to date with state and federal taxes. Its an irony of the US system that one can do this without formalizing ones status ( if you know how).

more than one case of deportation from Yonkers, the bronx, Queens or Rockland has been of people with homes, mortgages and established fully compliant , fully legal ( except for the owners status) businesses.
 

Roberto Jordan

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Good post. The US has no historical commitment, except in very restricted terms and for a relatively short duration, to a closed border policy. The country could not function if it chose to impose a NZ/Australian style points scheme for entry, or crack down on illegals, nor would there be widespread support for such a move. In general, they resolve hang overs with periodic amnesties.

There is also a cultural rejection of the concept of sealing off the US. Part of Americas self-image is that it is so attractive a destination, folk crawl through the desert or stow away on ships to reach the Golden Shore. The idea that immigrants have risked and fought to get there is important to them.
The more important point is that the demographic shunt conferred by migrants - who are generally young , fertile , willing to work for less than the prevailing rate and end up with big families, has - over the past 30 years- been one of the primary differentiation in US economic fundamentals from those of western Europe.

( this is also why some more typically conservative and right wing factions in europe are suddenly all pent up with emotion concerning refugees.....)
 

GDPR

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The more important point is that the demographic shunt conferred by migrants - who are generally young , fertile , willing to work for less than the prevailing rate and end up with big families, has - over the past 30 years- been one of the primary differentiation in US economic fundamentals from those of western Europe.

( this is also why some more typically conservative and right wing factions in europe are suddenly all pent up with emotion concerning refugees.....)
Oh I agree, but I see this as business as usual for the US from its inception. There are historical, economic, political, cultural and geographic factors all of which make the US "different" and always have.

Trump is simply a demagogue. He doesnt understand what he is talking about.
 

troll account

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Get yourself a usa licence...join the union...get library card..pay a bit of tax are these not ways to get documents :)
 

PBP voter

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JFK and his buddies in the Democrats change the system in the early 60s to stop educated Europeans coming to the US in huge numbers in favour of uneducated people from Central and South America. The old system was highly "racist".
They wanted to protect their own jobs and professions and used "racism" to do so.

John F. Kennedy initially proposed an overhaul of American immigration policy that was later to become the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, sponsored by his brother Senator Edward Kennedy. It dramatically shifted the source of immigration from Northern and Western European countries towards immigration from Latin America and Asia. The policy change also shifted the emphasis in the selection of immigrants in favor of family reunification.[267] Kennedy wanted to dismantle the selection of immigrants based on country of origin and saw this as an extension of his civil rights policies.[268]
 


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