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UCC to charge students to graduate


sarahj

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New UCC charge enrages students

After the outrage last week from students over the UCC presidents expenses (www.independent.ie/national-news/president-of-indebted-university-enjoying-the-high-life-2106272.html), students are now being asked to pay a conferring fee (www.corkstudentnews.com/breaking-news/main-news/ucc-conferring-charge-enrages-students/) on graduation. Apparently no explanation was offered for the introduction of the charge.

They’d want to take a look at their own finances before taking more of our money!”. Conor Lyons, a fist year Computer Science student called the move “disgraceful”, adding that graduation was a “right” of every student, and that charging for a right is ridiculous.
Those graduation ‘In Absentia’ will have their parchment sent by post to their home address, rather than be handed it at a ceremony.
- (http://www.corkstudentnews.com/breaking-news/main-news/ucc-conferring-charge-enrages-students)

There has already been a facebook group started to keep students up to date on the situation and might, one would hope, organise some sort of backlash against it.

<Mod> This thread has been merged with "New UCC charge enrages students". </Mod>
 
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jacko

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all UCC students got the following email last week.

you are going to have to pay €65 to attend the graduation ceremony.


Dear Students,

With effect from 1 April 2010, UCC will introduce a charge to all students who wish to attend their conferring ceremony.

The charge of €65 will apply to each student and their two guests choosing to attend their conferring ceremony and the post-ceremony reception. This charge will apply to Summer Conferrings in June, Autumn Conferrings in September and Winter Conferrings in December 2010.

UCC is currently adapting the e-payment facility on the Student Portal to accommodate this charge. Only online payments by Laser or Credit cards will be accepted. Only students eligible for conferring who have paid the conferring charge will receive their conferring informationpack, including tickets to attend the conferring ceremony and reception with their two guests.

Students who do not pay the conferring charge will be considered to have chosen to be conferred In Absentia and will not be able to attend the ceremony. Parchments for students conferred In Absentia will be posted to their college-registered home address following the conferring ceremonies. Further details will be available prior to the Summer Conferrings, including the deadline for payment of the conferring charge.

If you have any queries, please reply to this email address (m&c@ucc.ie)

Kind regards,
The Office of Media & Communications

UCC
 
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TommyO'Brien

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Jesus. Is that even legal? (The UCC charge, not David's move of the thread! ;) )
 

jacko

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major s.u. boycott campaign underway - coming so soon after expenses revelations it does not go down well
 

riven

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It is legal as long as registration fees and others are not meant for this activity. If however these fees are supposed to cover the ceremony then it is illegal.
 

The Field Marshal

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all UCC students got the following email last week.

you are going to have to pay €65 to attend the graduation ceremony.
Perhaps more detail would help.

The college can charge for guests but if a student did not have the money to pay Im sure the college could not prevent him/her from attending their own grad ceremony.
 

yalloy

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I had to pay Trinity 250 pounds to get my degree because I went to DIT. This was after fees were abolished. Not only that I have to carry the shame of graduating from that institution even though I never went there.
 

The Field Marshal

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It is legal as long as graduation ceremony costs are not paid for under the various fees etc.
No I dont think so.

A student has a legal right to be conferred in person.

If the student is devoid of the means to contribute to the negligible cost of handing him/her their piece of paper then they have to be somehow accommodated.

Were they prevented the college might find itself in legal hot water.

[I am instructing my legal team on the issue as we speak]
 
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I know some colleges & universities won't let you graduate unless you're fully paid up with all expenses and bills (incl examination fees, on-campus accommodation etc.).

I assume if they're defining the graduation as outside the actual academic year, then this isn't entirely unreasonable, is it? Like robe rental etc.
 

He3

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Mean spirited.


UCC - the Low Fares University....

coming shortly - rental charge on use of seats in lecture theatres
 
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johnfás

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A student has a legal right to be conferred in person
Under what law?

The only way they'll succeed is either for students who are already enrolled, where they may succeed on the basis of legitimate expectation, but this is unlikely. Or on the basis that the service is covered within the Registration Fee. If the regulation concerning the Registration Fee is unclear as to whether the graduation ceremony is a service covered by the fee, it seems most unlikely that they will succeed.

More likely just the usual bluster from an SU, but at least they're engaging on an issue of concern for students, for a change.
 

EvotingMachine0197

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I had to pay Trinity 250 pounds to get my degree because I went to DIT. This was after fees were abolished. Not only that I have to carry the shame of graduating from that institution even though I never went there.
Me too back in '89 before abolition of fees. I thought it was 300 Pounds for the Trinity day out?
 
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Then they should refuse to pay up. Clearly they're desperate after the years of property speculation spivvery and 'mission statements' under that fool Wrixon. Bullying staff, importing dead baby parts, reckless property gambling - somebody has to pay to bail them out. Never even turned up to either of my UCC graduations. I was getting pissed in Brussels Airport the morning of one of them...
 

CReidy

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Can't see why any student would have a legal right to attend their graduation, you have an entitlement under the agreement each student signs with their university upon enrolment to receive the relevant qualification, having completed all the necessary requirements for the degree. UCC aren’t depriving any student of their qualification or its relevant parchment, any who fail to attend the graduation ceremony shall receive it “in abstentia” i.e. mailed to their home.
 

Trampas

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Whatever happened to "Commencements".......or are they just for up-market institutions ?
 

The Field Marshal

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Can't see why any student would have a legal right to attend their graduation, you have an entitlement under the agreement each student signs with their university upon enrolment to receive the relevant qualification, having completed all the necessary requirements for the degree. UCC aren’t depriving any student of their qualification or its relevant parchment, any who fail to attend the graduation ceremony shall receive it “in abstentia” i.e. mailed to their home.
Well the college accepts the student and if the student completes successfully the course they are legally entitled to graduate in person.

The strict imposition of a specific fee to graduate in person would be in clear legal conflict with the equality laws contained in the statutes governing the operation of Irish universities.

Any forced conferring "in abstentia" would be just mere hypocrisy and stupidity on any Universities part.
 
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