UK 4th Most Admired Country

A view from England

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The 2010 Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands Index was compiled from the views of around 20,000 adults from around 20 countries.

UK 'is fourth most admired country' - And Finally, Frontpage - Independent.ie

Would it be possible for Ireland to benefit in some way from this? Could a joint UK/Ireland tourist scheme perhaps promote both countries in Europe and beyond to boost the economic prospects of both countries?
 


Cassandra Syndrome

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I assumed that going by your patriotic tunes that You were number 1 and that you ruled the world.
 

Sync

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Not really. Aside from speaking the same language, there's not a lot of similarities. I don't think the UK even advertises itself, normally it's the individual branches i.e come to Scotland etc. Plus we target the UK with a lot of our tourism. You'd be making a seperate board to promote it, and really all it would do would be to confuse matters.
"Come to London. Where you're just a quick flight, visa check, currency exchange and passport control to Dublin!" isn't a great tag line. Can't see any defined benefit for either party, and I can't see the UK promoting themselves as "The 4th most admired country" either.
 

A view from England

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Not really. Aside from speaking the same language, there's not a lot of similarities. I don't think the UK even advertises itself, normally it's the individual branches i.e come to Scotland etc. Plus we target the UK with a lot of our tourism. You'd be making a seperate board to promote it, and really all it would do would be to confuse matters.
"Come to London. Where you're just a quick flight, visa check, currency exchange and passport control to Dublin!" isn't a great tag line. Can't see any defined benefit for either party, and I can't see the UK promoting themselves as "The 4th most admired country" either.
Ah but you are forgetting Northern Ireland. Part of the UK last time I looked. Now I would have thought a joint effort to promote tourism would be beneficial. Perhaps Ireland likes it's tourism market as it is; failing.
 

blackadder0124

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Did I not see something recently on the BBC website stating that Britain was voted the worst place to live in Europe? We really need to maintain a separate Irish identity in tourism marketing terms anyway so I would be opposed to this suggestion.
 

Scipio

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The U.S. the most admired country?

This must be a list with a difference.
 

Chrisco

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Not really. Aside from speaking the same language, there's not a lot of similarities.
Viewed from the global perspective, that is, as the Spanish might not say, horseshít.

On the contrary, most people in Latin America and Asia (I don't know much about Africa) struggle to work out in what way we are different from the British.

We lose out big time by not having a commonly recognised tourist visa scheme with the UK, or even better with Schengen.
 

Arracht

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Sync

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Ah but you are forgetting Northern Ireland. Part of the UK last time I looked. Now I would have thought a joint effort to promote tourism would be beneficial. Perhaps Ireland likes it's tourism market as it is; failing.
NI promotes itself seperately as well. For many of the same reasons: Different currency, different exchequer, slightly different target market. NI focus on people in the Republic and vice versa. The North did a great job of getting the DiscoverIreland domain. Why split some of the people from that to the South?

The republic draws in far more US visitors based around it's history. Why would we drain some of those people off to the North? There's no reason for it. The ROI and North already have DiscoverIreland websites advertising "Come to Ireland" How would you show that this is now a united effort? "Come to a united IReland?" Don't see that going down well. It's about as integrated as it's going to get.

Simply because you can do something doesn't mean you should. There's no economies of scale here to further integration.
 

Scipio

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On the contrary, most people in Latin America and Asia (I don't know much about Africa) struggle to work out in what way we are different from the British.
What is this "most people"? Have you got polls or some other means to back that assertion up?

Given the history of Irish immigration to Argentina, I'd bet most know that Ireland and the U.K. are different places. Given people like Bernardo O'Higgins, I'd say Chileans would be in a similar position.

Or is that just your personal impression talking?

We lose out big time by not having a commonly recognised tourist visa scheme with the UK, or even better with Schengen.
The vast majority of tourists who come to Ireland have no need of visas. Of those who do, I don't expect a deluge of Cuban or Iraqi tourists to our shores any time soon.
 

Squire Allworthy

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Would it be possible for Ireland to benefit in some way from this? Could a joint UK/Ireland tourist scheme perhaps promote both countries in Europe and beyond to boost the economic prospects of both countries?
I doubt it would work as there is little in common from a tourist point of view, unless it was package holidays. A week of Arts and culture in London or the medieval cathedrals followed by a week in the wilds of the west coast. Might work but you would need to get a company to promote it.


Mind you I saw an unlikely combination for a holiday advertised in Argentina. It was the highlands of Scotland, Belfast, London, Paris and Madrid!
 

Chrisco

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What is this "most people"? Have you got polls or some other means to back that assertion up?

Given the history of Irish immigration to Argentina, I'd bet most know that Ireland and the U.K. are different places. Given people like Bernardo O'Higgins, I'd say Chileans would be in a similar position.

Or is that just your personal impression talking?
I didn't say they didn't know they are different places, I said they don't know in what way we are different.

And on a point of information, for the periods you are talking about, Ireland and the UK weren't different places.

The vast majority of tourists who come to Ireland have no need of visas.
Kind of proves my point...
 

Arracht

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I'm guessing Ireland wasn't included in the 50 nation list as it's not mentioned in the Independent article.

I would've thought that we would've done quite well in the categories mentioned.

rich in historic building and monuments
rich in natural beauty
rich cultural heritage
interesting and exciting place for contemporary culture such as music, films, art and literature

Possibly not for:
excelling at sports
 

Scipio

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I didn't say they didn't know they are different places, I said they don't know in what way we are different.
The fact that we're a different country might be a subtle indicator. Also the fact that we have a different first official language, a differing literature, differing music and dance (much of which is popular in Latin America and Asia), a history of conflict against England etc. etc. etc.

But then again, "most people" from Latin America and Asia wouldn't know that, would they.

And on a point of information, for the periods you are talking about, Ireland and the UK weren't different places.
Actually, yes they were. Bernardo O'Higgins was born in 1778 of Irish parentage. Ireland didn't join the United Kingdom until 1801.

Irish emigration to Argentina has been noted as early as the mid 1700s.

If you're going to (try to) be pedantic, get your facts in order.

Kind of proves my point...
No, it doesn't.

Why on earth would Ireland negotiate a joint tourist visa scheme with the U.K. when the vast majority of tourists don't need visas to come here in the first place? :confused:
 
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The 2010 Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands Index was compiled from the views of around 20,000 adults from around 20 countries.

UK 'is fourth most admired country' - And Finally, Frontpage - Independent.ie

Would it be possible for Ireland to benefit in some way from this? Could a joint UK/Ireland tourist scheme perhaps promote both countries in Europe and beyond to boost the economic prospects of both countries?
Looks like not all the news is good for your part of the world:

Great Britain is 'worst place to live in Europe' - Yahoo! News UK
 
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What is this "most people"? Have you got polls or some other means to back that assertion up?

Given the history of Irish immigration to Argentina, I'd bet most know that Ireland and the U.K. are different places. Given people like Bernardo O'Higgins, I'd say Chileans would be in a similar position.

Or is that just your personal impression talking?



The vast majority of tourists who come to Ireland have no need of visas. Of those who do, I don't expect a deluge of Cuban or Iraqi tourists to our shores any time soon.
Whatever about South America, I'm not sure how many of our fellow Europeans understand that Ireland and the UK are different places. I was Greece in June, and lost count of the number of times I had to explain to people that the south is completely independent. I had to pretty much state flate out, more than once: "I am Irish, not British" and had to flash my passport before one particularly sceptical taxi driver believed me...
 

Chrisco

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The fact that we're a different country might be a subtle indicator. Also the fact that we have a different first official language, a differing literature, differing music and dance (much of which is popular in Latin America and Asia), a history of conflict against England etc. etc. etc.
You seem to struggle with the idea that people in far flung countries don't know the things about your country that you do...

Macedonia is a different country from Bulgaria - can you tell me the difference between them? Or Kosovo and Albania? Or Malaysia and Indonesia? Or Nicaragua and Guatemala? Or Botswana and Lesotho...?

No, I didn't think so.

Everything you say above could also be said about the Scots and the Welsh. So how does that make us different from the British? (which was the original point, not the English)

But then again, "most people" from Latin America and Asia wouldn't know that, would they.
No, they wouldn't. Most people in China or India haven't even heard of Ireland.

I am married to a Colombian and lived for a while both there and in China: I know what I am talking about when it comes to having to sell Ireland.

Actually, yes they were. Bernardo O'Higgins was born in 1778 of Irish parentage. Ireland didn't join the United Kingdom until 1801.

Irish emigration to Argentina has been noted as early as the mid 1700s.

If you're going to (try to) be pedantic, get your facts in order.
Lol. Yes Petunia, whatever you say.

Why on earth would Ireland negotiate a joint tourist visa scheme with the U.K. when the vast majority of tourists don't need visas to come here in the first place? :confused:
Did it ever occur to you that they don't come because they need a visa? :roll:

Now, having said all that, no single event has raised more awareness of Ireland in China, for example, than the featuring of Riverdance at the Chinese New Year's TV gala a few years ago, which was a massive success. A lot of middle-class Chinese at least know something, anything, about Ireland, which would not necessarily have been the case 5 or 10 years ago. These same people have the money and opportunity to travel to Europe, for which they get a Schengen visa, and sometimes a visa for the UK. How many do you think go to the hassle of trying to get an Irish visa to spend just a couple of days of their trip in Ireland?

Hardly any.
 

Green eyed monster

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You seem to struggle with the idea that people in far flung countries don't know the things about your country that you do...

Macedonia is a different country from Bulgaria - can you tell me the difference between them? Or Kosovo and Albania? Or Malaysia and Indonesia? Or Nicaragua and Guatemala? Or Botswana and Lesotho...?
The kind of people who travel the world are the kind of people who would know.

The ones who don't, don't particularly matter as much from the point of view of tourism revenue.

How i learned for example of the existence of Nepal when i was a child, or the difference between Chile and Argentina, Greece and Bulgaria, Zaire and Zimbabwe... is by looking at a map of the countries of the world, there is one in most classrooms.

Scotland was not differentiated to England on it, nor was the Basque country but it was clear that the Rep of Ireland was a different colour to Britain and it was clear what different colours meant, the map of the world is one of the earliest tools of learning children are exposed to and which is imprinted on their minds.
 

Chrisco

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The kind of people who travel the world are the kind of people who would know.
Spoken with all the authority of someone who sounds like they haven't travelled much.

Would know what?

How i learned for example of the existence of Nepal when i was a child, or the difference between Chile and Argentina, Greece and Bulgaria, Zaire and Zimbabwe... is by looking at a map of the countries of the world, there is one in most classrooms.

Scotland was not differentiated to England on it, nor was the Basque country but it was clear that the Rep of Ireland was a different colour to Britain and it was clear what different colours meant, the map of the world is one of the earliest tools of learning children are exposed to and which is imprinted on their minds.
Christ alive, nowhere has it been said that they don't know Ireland exists. What they don't know is in what way it is different from Britain and whether it is worth the hassle of getting a separate visa to visit (particularly when they can visit the northern part of our island without one, if they are so minded...)
 
G

Gimpanzee

I'm guessing Ireland wasn't included in the 50 nation list as it's not mentioned in the Independent article.

I would've thought that we would've done quite well in the categories mentioned.

rich in historic building and monuments
rich in natural beauty
rich cultural heritage
interesting and exciting place for contemporary culture such as music, films, art and literature

Possibly not for:
excelling at sports
What is it with recognising reality and Irish people? Feckin hell, we're a backwater in terms of culture and history - particularly buildings. This is a pretty island, but you can apply your correct reading of our sporting prowess to our culture too. Don't get hung up on it. Given where we are located, 53 deg north and out in the North Atlantic, it is no reflection on anyone who lived here. Aside from keeping things green it was not a very favourable location for human development relative a lot of the other countries.
 


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