UK doctors call for a ban on tackling in underage Rugby.

redneck

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Over 70 doctors have written a letter to the UK government calling for ban on tackling in schools and underage rugby. They want to see a "tag rugby" or touch rugby style of game for under age youths. This is because of the high amount of injuries and concussions. I have a nephew who just got a broken collar bone in an underage match recently.


http://www.thejournal.ie/rugby-ban-on-tackling-letter-2636702-Mar2016/

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-and-law/courts/rugby-forced-to-take-deeper-look-at-concussion-1.1736739
 


Ó Ghabhainn

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Over 70 doctors have written a letter to the UK government calling for ban on tackling in schools and underage rugby. They want to see a "tag rugby" or touch rugby style of game for under age youths. This is because of the high amount of injuries and concussions. I have a nephew who just got a broken collar bone in an underage match recently.


Doctors call for a ban on tackling in youth rugby · TheJournal.ie

Rugby forced to take deeper look at concussion
I know a guy who was paralysed in a ruck in schools rugby but says that banning tackles removes from the game. Players know what they sign up to in that view.

What do we class as underage?
 

redneck

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All games have value. I like Rugby but prefer GAA and Soccer. All have a value. But unfortunately the GAA gets singled out for critisism. Sorry if I appear anti Rugby - I think it is a good pastime and well enough run also.
But tackling and medical affairs on the pitch need improvement, so does GAA and Soccer.
 

redneck

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I know a guy who was paralysed in a ruck in schools rugby but says that banning tackles removes from the game. Players know what they sign up to in that view.

What do we class as underage?
Anything up to Schools level. That would be about 17 years old and less.
 

PBP voter

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All games have value. I like Rugby but prefer GAA and Soccer. All have a value. But unfortunately the GAA gets singled out for critisism. Sorry if I appear anti Rugby - I think it is a good pastime and well enough run also.
But tackling and medical affairs on the pitch need improvement, so does GAA and Soccer.
It's a tricky one for rugby. No tackling up to the age of 18. Will all the skills be lost? Will it make players even more injury prone when they hit 18?

Good article from 2000. White kids were abandoning rugby in NZ. I think it was mainly due to the physical aspect of the game increasing.


CLUBS and schools have experienced a dramatic change in recent years, to the extent that of the 450 registered players in the Auckland Premier Division, only 45 are white. The headmaster of the city's most famous rugby-playing school, which has produced a record 32 All Blacks, says pupils are switching to other sports at their parents' insistence.
In the last year the area has lost 16 rugby teams and gained 30 football sides. There is also the fear that the `big hit' style of the Pacific Islanders is dumbing down the game. A quarter of Auckland's 1.2 million population are Samoan, Tongan, Cook Islanders or from any of the other South Pacific atolls with more arriving every day. Some feel they are hijacking the original New Zealand rugby culture. Others fear racism could become an issue. The game is shifting rapidly.

White players shying away from All Black future - Telegraph
 

Ó Ghabhainn

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Anything up to Schools level. That would be about 17 years old and less.
Not having played rugby, I believe players, ex-players, etc should have their voices heard rather than have the views of Health & Safety imposed on them. Risk involves living and it's up to those who are living it to decide if the risk is worthwhile. Hope your nephew recovers well, btw.

If we're talking about quality of life, see the aforementioned living. As to life after, god forbid, injury, again was it worth it? And technology has improved to such an extent that life can remain good. As I said, it's up to players and those with the relevant experience (perhaps extending beyond rugby), not just professionals in my view. Risk comes from having lived.
 

Paddy Sarkozy

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I'd like to see Ireland change tack on its sports policy.
It's clear in rugby we can never NEVER beat New Zealand. We don't need to examine this fact any further. We should just accept it and move on.
We need to set out a sport strategy say for 20 years and work that groove.
Combative sports, including soccer, hurling, rugby and gaelic football should be downgraded, they are not supported by sufficient numbers of boys and girls in any class.
We have to settle on a sport that gives good fitness return and exercises the intelligence of each child while not exposing them to the threat of life changing injury.
The sport should also be team-based to teach youngsters the value of co-operating with colleagues (another reason not to support golf).
Volleyball would fit all the above, but no doubt there are others.
Once this has been agreed in the Dail, we can go ahead and fund the sport across the country and watch the gold medals roll in as early as the next Olympics.
 

Diawlbach

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Ah, not this bollocks again.

They're not medical doctors. They're overwhelmingly sociologists. Pollock has form for iffy data use on this, and has been publicly hauled up by people like Ken Quarrie for it.
 

shoneen

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I'd like to see Ireland change tack on its sports policy.
It's clear in rugby we can never NEVER beat New Zealand. We don't need to examine this fact any further. We should just accept it and move on.
We need to set out a sport strategy say for 20 years and work that groove.
Combative sports, including soccer, hurling, rugby and gaelic football should be downgraded, they are not supported by sufficient numbers of boys and girls in any class.
We have to settle on a sport that gives good fitness return and exercises the intelligence of each child while not exposing them to the threat of life changing injury.
The sport should also be team-based to teach youngsters the value of co-operating with colleagues (another reason not to support golf).
Volleyball would fit all the above, but no doubt there are others.
Once this has been agreed in the Dail, we can go ahead and fund the sport across the country and watch the gold medals roll in as early as the next Olympics.
You make some interesting points, but I'm not sure about volleyball. I've seen a number of documentaries (from Sweden, I think) where they play mixed teams. As the game moves on there seems to be more and more clothing lost until it all ends in a sort of naked scrum with a lot of funny things happening. Even when it's only women playing, there same sort of thing seems to happen. It's certainly not the kind of game I'd like our young people exposed to! :?
 
D

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We may as well ban rugby then, or ban men from playing it, and watch wimmen's rugby.

Learning to execute a tackle (or sustain one) are core skills that must be honed and refined as early as possible.

Ireland's poor scrummaging performances - excluding Rossy/Best/Healy - is partly down to limitations (no pushing @ 15 and under) at school's level.
 

Seanie Lemass

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I'd like to see Ireland change tack on its sports policy.
It's clear in rugby we can never NEVER beat New Zealand. We don't need to examine this fact any further. We should just accept it and move on.
We need to set out a sport strategy say for 20 years and work that groove.
Combative sports, including soccer, hurling, rugby and gaelic football should be downgraded, they are not supported by sufficient numbers of boys and girls in any class.
We have to settle on a sport that gives good fitness return and exercises the intelligence of each child while not exposing them to the threat of life changing injury.
The sport should also be team-based to teach youngsters the value of co-operating with colleagues (another reason not to support golf).
Volleyball would fit all the above, but no doubt there are others.
Once this has been agreed in the Dail, we can go ahead and fund the sport across the country and watch the gold medals roll in as early as the next Olympics.


Why don't we all just stay in our houses and watch TV? Or might you be afraid that the TV might fall on top of the childer?

If people want to play rugby or drive motorbikes or climb mountains, that's their fkn business. Not some cabal of "social scientists".
 

bustedshaun

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The professional game has turned high mass high impact. Young uns are mirroring this at school. I have a nephew with endless ongoing problems/fitting psychosis from head trauma school ruby aged 12. When I played at county youth level back in't day there was more actual tackling than head on train wrecks.
 
D

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Why don't we all just stay in our houses and watch TV? Or might you be afraid that the TV might fall on top of the childer?

If people want to play rugby or drive motorbikes or climb mountains, that's their fkn business. Not some cabal of "social scientists".
Mostly wimmen and wimpy manginas I'd imagine.
 

Diawlbach

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We may as well ban rugby then, or ban men from playing it, and watch wimmen's rugby.

Learning to execute a tackle (or sustain one) are core skills that must be honed and refined as early as possible.

Ireland's poor scrummaging performances - excluding Rossy/Best/Healy - is partly down to limitations (no pushing @ 15 and under) at school's level.
Healy's a big-hit loose head. He got tuned brutally for much of his early career, including Adam Jones melding him in the 2011 quarter. Got better, but the engage changed and he's broken. Best, yes. Ross is static, never an attacking TH. What I would agree is, props do need to learn their trade propping rather than in an Academy. Get 'em playing.
 

Diawlbach

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The professional game has turned high mass high impact. Young uns are mirroring this at school. I have a nephew with endless ongoing problems/fitting psychosis from head trauma school ruby aged 12. When I played at county youth level back in't day there was more actual tackling than head on train wrecks.
No; bad pro rugby has. Watch the ABs running at spaces, not faces, you see why pure bulk is a dead end.
 

petaljam

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All games have value. I like Rugby but prefer GAA and Soccer. All have a value. But unfortunately the GAA gets singled out for critisism. Sorry if I appear anti Rugby - I think it is a good pastime and well enough run also.
But tackling and medical affairs on the pitch need improvement, so does GAA and Soccer.
One of my sons played several years of rugby, he does martial arts too but he had more injuries from rugby than he ever did in his Viet Vo Dao fights. I think it's got more dangerous than it was in the past. It's the contact aspect that worried me - in martial arts fighting it's more choreographed, so even when it's a real fight they can still counter. In rugby they're expected to pile in and like it.
 

toughbutfair

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I think at school age it should be weight class , like boxing , or maybe a more complex combination of weight and age
 

petaljam

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The professional game has turned high mass high impact. Young uns are mirroring this at school. I have a nephew with endless ongoing problems/fitting psychosis from head trauma school ruby aged 12. When I played at county youth level back in't day there was more actual tackling than head on train wrecks.
Yes, this. That's what I saw too, a macho thing of everyone piling in head first. I don't mean there's no tactic involved, but there's a premium on being prepared to be injured that I don't think other collective sports have. Another one that's a bit like that, though not collective of course, is boys' gymnastics. Again IME as a parent.
 
D

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Healy's a big-hit loose head. He got tuned brutally for much of his early career, including Adam Jones melding him in the 2011 quarter. Got better, but the engage changed and he's broken. Best, yes. Ross is static, never an attacking TH. What I would agree is, props do need to learn their trade propping rather than in an Academy. Get 'em playing.
I seem to recall one Graham Rowntree giving Adam a rinsing in '05. That said, Adam was inexperienced and up against a wiley old English LH. :)

Jones did a job on Healy in 2011. Jones was a superb TH though, and at the height of his powers then. That said, I think Adam benefitted enormously from the hit. Once the hit was de-powered, I think jones lost the dominance he once had.....Healy handled him fairly easily in 2013 and 2014 (although the scrums were a mess in the 2014 tie).

I think Healy improved with the new engage laws. Ireland had the best FR during the 2014 6N tournament. As for Ross: yes, he's not a destructive TH, but the important thing from an Irish perspective was that he give us parity. That's something that we were badly missing for a very long time.

We're playing your lads in the opener in 6N 2017 I think. How's Samson Lee getting on? Looked savage when he first appeared. Seems to struggle a bit at international level?
 


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