UK high street stores in Ireland after Brexit ..



forest

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H&M is Swedish!
And Massimo Dutti is Spanish also, I was wrong. I dunno where I got the Portuguese thing from? It started off in Barcelona, which would explain why when I was in Barcelona in November, every street corner had one.
Every feckin second shop unit was Zara, though, a brand I have no use for.
The quality is crap.
A curse on thee and your family

I love Zara half my wardrobe is Zara
 

Bea C

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A curse on thee and your family

I love Zara half my wardrobe is Zara
I think the quality has fallen out of the ar$e of most things, though, no brand more so than Benetton.
All my jumpers and cardigans - wool in the winter, cotton in the summer - were Benetton. This winter I've bought what, er, two jumpers, two cardigans. On a Sunday I could be wearing a Benetton jumper from 2013 and it's still perfectly respectable. Anything I've bought last year I'd say I've parted with. You could read the newspaper through them. Though having said that, I bought a cotton jumper in the Oxford Street shop a a few weeks back, the stuff was coming in, and the quality is up on last year.
M&S is another one which has slid badly. I used to find them handy for shoes: most adult brands start at a four, I'm a three. But they're plastic now, by-and-large.
 
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M&S is another one which has slid badly. I used to find them handy for shoes: most adult brands start at a four, I'm a three. But they're plastic now, by-and-large.
Long as the shoews look after those lovely ankles who cares what size you wear ;)
 

Sync

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Interesting to note the continued problems of stores that have overly committed to high street storefronts.

Forever 21 are gone, Ashley's empire is stretched suuuuuper thin and feels like it's about to topple.

Mamas and Papas, Mothercare both on the brink and today Gap flagged more concerns with their empire which includes Banana Republic and Hill City and of course Old Navy.

Gap outlined a plan to rescue itself in February, and Wall Street was firmly behind it: The company would spin off its popular Old Navy brand in 2020 and focus on its own struggling flagship, as well as its Banana Republic, Athleta and Hill City lines.
But the future of that strategy is now up in the air.
Gap chief executive Art Peck, an architect of the plan who said in February that he wanted to "write the next chapter for specialty retail," abruptly stepped down Thursday and will give up his board seat. Gap tapped Robert Fisher, a son of the Gap's founders, to step in as interim CEO.
Perhaps more troubling, Gap said that sales at Old Navy stores open at least a year slipped 4% during its most recent quarter compared with the same period a year earlier. Gap also trimmed its guidance for the remainder of the year.
Such a red flag.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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There is decimation on the way I suspect in January in retail/high street shares and operations. Debenhams has been showing signs of stress discernible on the shop floor in the reduced number of lines they are carrying, and a slightly panicky look about their marketing.

Marks & Spencer are a weird company in a way. A sort of cultural institution as much as a for-profit business. They are regarded as a bellwether for the high street in the UK even though they aren't average in their markets, being a bit more expensive than most for what they sell. The other thing about M&S is that in some ways it is a property company more than a retail store.

What I mean by that is that they own many of their high street stores and they only revalue the property assets the company holds every twenty years. City analysts know this (at least I hope they do) and price it into their shares. The markets would anyway.

But Debenhams is in real trouble I think.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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I suspect that there is a long-tail problem here too as the big shopping centres must be feeling the pressure in lowering lease square foot charges in the big centres just to avoid having boarded up or whitewashed empty units on the mall.

Jane Norman I think went into administration in 2011 I think and that was a blow both for their employees and for the big shopping centre owners who suddenly had a lot of retail units in shopping centres come on the market around the same time.

So it won't be just the High Streets that feel the pinch but the shopping centres are failing to compete also against online shopping. I suspect High Street clothing and shopping centre retail clothing outlets are only surviving on a footfall which is increasingly of the older generation and where young people come in they are eyeballing a product and then going off and ordering it online for delivery.

With the shopping centres possibly going to struggle that means the big property companies like Liberty Group who own six or seven of the biggest shopping centres from Newcastle and Manchester down to Kent are also going to get a slow kick in the teeth. The only thing that can happen is rents soften dramatically in such centres and while we can restore High Streets to some extent by restoring cafe culture to them and perhaps making an arguably better social asset out of them than they are now, I think there will be fewer shopping centres in the near future as well. That would be a lot of square footage falling onto a new floor in the property market considerably lower than it is today.

What to do with those when the time comes. Sports and leisure centres instead, perhaps. Loads of free parking. I'd love to see Brent Cross Shopping Centre levelled and a load of green football pitches put there instead. Or a new park. Shopping Centres are terrible things, aesthetically and fairly commonly so. I find them quite depressing to look at.

It is by far the best thing in Zombie movies as shopping centres are handy locations for film crews too and relatively cheap to get as locations especially for filming at night. Great seeing a shopping centre get zombified and broken to bits by massive shoot-ups and so forth. But that's a whole different debate.
 
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Lumpy Talbot

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I blame that a55hole Santa. He kicked off the whole retail christmas frenzy in a way, the fat terrorist. Him and his stealth-sleigh.
 

Sync

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Debs is doomed. I’ve been saying it for years. A broken version of an outdated model. There’s no fix for it.

It links back to Ashley who’s trying to take it over and seems to be replicating the same death throes we saw Thomas cook engage in.

We’re big! But the markets shifted. And we’re in Trouble. But so are our competitors! So let’s buy our competitors! It’s such a Transparently poor strategy.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Yes, it would be an uncertain long term strategy, becoming a cartel in a dwindling market and probably borrowing to do it. That can only end in downward pressure on business valuation eventually. The only way it could be successful is to discover a new reason for being, a new Unique Selling Point which has largely evaporated or is in the process of doing so.

I don't see any way back for Debenhams, agreed. Their model is too exposed to completely changed consumer dynamics.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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I suppose one useful change would be to gather up all the various Chicken Palaces, Chicken Mansions, Chicken Shacks, Chicken Gazebos, Chicken Front Porch's around the country and put them all together in emptied Debenhams stores and rebrand it as 'Chicken Universe' or something. Old people could go there for warmth and to save on the heating bills.

Old people would smell of fried chicken all the time. Mind you, it would probably be more welcome than a faint whiff of wee.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Something a bit depressing about the consumer venn diagram that intersects the area between types of property and fried chicken. Chicken Garage, Chicken Hut, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Alabama Fried Chicken.... fried chicken is the modern equivalent of the ubiquitous curly, dry cheese sandwich British Rail was infamous for in the 1970s.
 


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