UK regional wealth disparities - winners and losers.

O

Oscurito

The UK's Office of National Statistics (the equivalent of our CSO) published yesterday its annual figures on wealth per person in the various UK regions. You can find the data here; click on the green "xls (9.0MB)" button. The data that the graph below is based on are in the tab called "Table 3". Table 3 has so much more detail though with statistics for sub-regions and local areas.

The statistics are based on Gross Value Added (Income) which:
comprises compensation of employees , plus gross operating surplus, plus mixed income, plus taxes on production, less subsidies on production.

The figures for the last 16 years as depicted below show England with wealth per capita above the UK average while Scotland is slightly below. Wales and Northern Ireland continue to significantly underperform. Wales might pass out Northern Ireland in the next few years if only because its rate of decline seems to be slower.

Northern Ireland does, of course, have some significant disadvantages what with the legacy of the Troubles and its being geographically isolated from the other three regions. Perhaps the reason why it has outperformed Wales until now is due to its being adjacent to the Republic of Ireland where GDP per capita as expressed in USDs is well above that of the UK.

 


Cai

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The UK's Office of National Statistics (the equivalent of our CSO) published yesterday its annual figures on wealth per person in the various UK regions. You can find the data here; click on the green "xls (9.0MB)" button. The data that the graph below is based on are in the tab called "Table 3". Table 3 has so much more detail though with statistics for sub-regions and local areas.

The statistics are based on Gross Value Added (Income) which:
comprises compensation of employees , plus gross operating surplus, plus mixed income, plus taxes on production, less subsidies on production.

The figures for the last 16 years as depicted below show England with wealth per capita above the UK average while Scotland is slightly below. Wales and Northern Ireland continue to significantly underperform. Wales might pass out Northern Ireland in the next few years if only because its rate of decline seems to be slower.

Northern Ireland does, of course, have some significant disadvantages what with the legacy of the Troubles and its being geographically isolated from the other three regions. Perhaps the reason why it has outperformed Wales until now is due to its being adjacent to the Republic of Ireland where GDP per capita as expressed in USDs is well above that of the UK.

Large parts of Wales are post industrial & we're run by morons.
 
O

Oscurito

Large parts of Wales are post industrial & we're run by morons.
Does Wales get much in terms of public sector employment? I know Northern Ireland would be an economic wasteland were it not for the public sector.
 

Roll_On

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Wales is also stuffed with civil servants. Strangely enough civil servants in the UK don't really do strikes or make wage demands, despite being on really crappy pay and conditions compared to their Irish counterparts.
 

Analyzer

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NI is indeed pumped with other people's money, via regional transfers.

And then within NI you also have people living off other people's money, via protection rackets, extortion, robbery, etc....
 
O

Oscurito

NI is indeed pumped with other people's money, via regional transfers.

And then within NI you also have people living off other people's money, via protection rackets, extortion, robbery, etc....
I doubt that that type of economic activity is included in official statistics. :|
 
O

Oscurito

Wales is also stuffed with civil servants. Strangely enough civil servants in the UK don't really do strikes or make wage demands, despite being on really crappy pay and conditions compared to their Irish counterparts.
Public sector employment in NI is 31% of the workforce. It's not clear whether Wales or Scotland are the next highest. They seem to both be around 24-25%. In the UK as a whole, it's 20%.

The public sector in the Republic of Ireland accounts for 18.4 per cent of total employment.
 

farnaby

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Wales is also stuffed with civil servants. Strangely enough civil servants in the UK don't really do strikes or make wage demands, despite being on really crappy pay and conditions compared to their Irish counterparts.
A strong pound has enabled low income earners to buy the (generally-imported) essentials, which stifles the grumbling. Food prices are generally lower in the UK. A weak pound post-Brexit may change that.
 

Super Caley

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The UK's Office of National Statistics (the equivalent of our CSO) published yesterday its annual figures on wealth per person in the various UK regions. You can find the data here; click on the green "xls (9.0MB)" button. The data that the graph below is based on are in the tab called "Table 3". Table 3 has so much more detail though with statistics for sub-regions and local areas.

The statistics are based on Gross Value Added (Income) which:
comprises compensation of employees , plus gross operating surplus, plus mixed income, plus taxes on production, less subsidies on production.

The figures for the last 16 years as depicted below show England with wealth per capita above the UK average while Scotland is slightly below. Wales and Northern Ireland continue to significantly underperform. Wales might pass out Northern Ireland in the next few years if only because its rate of decline seems to be slower.

Northern Ireland does, of course, have some significant disadvantages what with the legacy of the Troubles and its being geographically isolated from the other three regions. Perhaps the reason why it has outperformed Wales until now is due to its being adjacent to the Republic of Ireland where GDP per capita as expressed in USDs is well above that of the UK.

Are the figures for England not skewed by London? Take out the city etc and all that dubious foreign money, and England doesn't look so good.

And those figures which put Ireland's GDP ahead of the likes of Switzerland and Jersey smack of leprachaun economics.
 

Roll_On

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Public sector employment in NI is 31% of the workforce. It's not clear whether Wales or Scotland are the next highest. They seem to both be around 24-25%. In the UK as a whole, it's 20%.

The public sector in the Republic of Ireland accounts for 18.4 per cent of total employment.
Surprised NI is only 31% I would've expected that figure to far exceed 50%. Is that counting all the NHS, PSNI and council staff? what about heavily subsidized companies like translink?

Unlike Wales, NI also receives an indirect subvention from the Republic of Ireland through funding for road scehemes, and basically the ROI state owned ESB pays for the upkeep of the NI electricity grid.

It really is money pit.
 
O

Oscurito

Are the figures for England not skewed by London? Take out the city etc and all that dubious foreign money, and England doesn't look so good.

And those figures which put Ireland's GDP ahead of the likes of Switzerland and Jersey smack of leprachaun economics.
Oh, I know. But even if you allow for a correction of 25% (by far the highest correction factor I've seen being recommended), the RoI is still well ahead of the UK.

I'll look into the England figures and get back to you.
 

Roll_On

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Are the figures for England not skewed by London? Take out the city etc and all that dubious foreign money, and England doesn't look so good.
Don't understand why people say things like this, e.g. take Dublin out of it and GDP is very small, but why do that? you're just taking out parts at random to make the figure lower for no good reason.
 
O

Oscurito

Surprised NI is only 31% I would've expected that figure to far exceed 50%. Is that counting all the NHS, PSNI and council staff? what about heavily subsidized companies like translink?

Unlike Wales, NI also receives an indirect subvention from the Republic of Ireland through funding for road scehemes, and basically the ROI state owned ESB pays for the upkeep of the NI electricity grid.

It really is money pit.
I have the impression that it's contribution to the economy exceeds 50% but I can't find any links to back that up.

You can kind of see why Wales voted for Brexit and NI didn't.
 
O

Oscurito

Are the figures for England not skewed by London? Take out the city etc and all that dubious foreign money, and England doesn't look so good.

And those figures which put Ireland's GDP ahead of the likes of Switzerland and Jersey smack of leprachaun economics.
These are the figures for the so-called NUTS1 regions. Most of England is below the UK average and most of England is poorer than Scotland.

London 172.1
South East 109.8
East of England 94.6
Scotland 93.4
South West 90.8
North West 86.3
East Midlands 82.6
West Midlands 82.1
Yorkshire and The Humber 80.3
North East 74.7
Northern Ireland 73.3
Wales 71.0
 

Trainwreck

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The UK's Office of National Statistics (the equivalent of our CSO) published yesterday its annual figures on wealth per person in the various UK regions. You can find the data here; click on the green "xls (9.0MB)" button. The data that the graph below is based on are in the tab called "Table 3". Table 3 has so much more detail though with statistics for sub-regions and local areas.

The statistics are based on Gross Value Added (Income) which:
comprises compensation of employees , plus gross operating surplus, plus mixed income, plus taxes on production, less subsidies on production.

The figures for the last 16 years as depicted below show England with wealth per capita above the UK average while Scotland is slightly below. Wales and Northern Ireland continue to significantly underperform. Wales might pass out Northern Ireland in the next few years if only because its rate of decline seems to be slower.

Northern Ireland does, of course, have some significant disadvantages what with the legacy of the Troubles and its being geographically isolated from the other three regions. Perhaps the reason why it has outperformed Wales until now is due to its being adjacent to the Republic of Ireland where GDP per capita as expressed in USDs is well above that of the UK.

Are the data adjusted for price levels in different regions?


No.


= incomplete and misleading.
 

Cai

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Does Wales get much in terms of public sector employment? I know Northern Ireland would be an economic wasteland were it not for the public sector.

Yes. Most of Wales is dependent on the public sector - although not quite to the same extent as Northern Ireland.

Had you not become independent in the 20s, you'd probably be in the same state.
 


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