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Unionism must have a veto on Irish reunification - Seamus Mallon

Marcella

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A lot of what Seamus Mallon says in this article makes perfect sense. Of course a broad base of support for reunification should be built and unionist fears need to be addressed.

However his basic contention that a simple majority in favour of reunification can not warrant such an outcome is completely at odds with the terms of the Good Friday agreement.

In effect, Mallon, wants to hand unionists a veto on Irish reunification.

This isn’t the first time such comments have been forthcoming. Enda Kenny, Bertie Ahern and Leo Varadkar have all made similar comments in the past.

Such an assertion is morally and legally in direct contravention of the GFA. A key component of which was to offer Irish nationalists a clear and unambiguous path to a United Ireland.

To have a former leader of nationalism and an architect of the GFA to completely undermine a key tenet of the agreement is hard to understand and justify.

As we approach the demographic tipping point in the north the attempts to change the goal posts need to be vigorously and democratically resisted.

The principle of consent must be safe guarded from an Irish political class that seems hell bent on appeasing unionism at the expense of democracy in Ireland.
 
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APettigrew92

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However his basic contention that a simple majority in favour of reunification can not warrant such an outcome is completely at odds with the terms of the Good Friday agreement.

In effect, Mallon, wants to hand unionists a veto on Irish reunification.

This isn’t the first time such comments have been forthcoming. Enda Kenny, Bertie Ahern and Leo Varadkar have all made similar comments in the past.
The establishment have and had no presence north of the border. They drew their line at the partition markers almost a century ago and decided that they'd fight the good fight for Irish unity in the bogs of West Mayo rather than somewhere that may have been contentious.

If the North is amalgamated into the South tomorrow, then Sinn Fein become the out and out largest party. This would be a nightmare for all the gombeen parties which have built a legacy on being both republican and partitionist at the same time.

The only compromise that both unionists and partitionist nationalists will countenance is the establishment of a federalized Ulster in some sort of constitutional union with the south. The Unionists and FG/FF have that much in common, neither want to cede their positions of relative comfort to SF without a fight.

That article bleeds insecurity and fear, though. You'd have to wonder what possessed anyone to write something that's embarrassing to parties on both side of the border.

NI came about precisely because of numbers. For it to now persist in spite of numbers is just laughable. By that same logic, the nationalists north of the border never should've been incorporated as a minority into a state.
 

McTell

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No
OP


//

In effect, Mallon, wants to hand unionists a veto on Irish reunification.

//

The whole notion of defining people by their grandparents' religions and views in 1916-23 is so hopelessly backward and irrelevant.

It means that the nordies will eventually come in to unity with their heads in the wrong place, on the back foot, and will then be shafted financially in the time-honoured way.
 

GabhaDubh

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This quote is the winner.

“Irish unity by numbers won’t work. We made that mistake 100 years ago, when Northern Ireland was set up on the basis of a head count.

“We” had no say. The division of our Country was rammed down our throats.
 

raetsel

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Such an assertion is morally and legally in direct contravention of the GFA. A key component of which was to offer Irish nationalists a clear and unambiguous path to a United Ireland.

To have a former leader of nationalism and an architect of the GFA to completely undermine a key tenet of the agreement is hard to understand and justify.
The idea that unionism should have a veto is just not on. However nationalists do need to recognise the reality that in the event of a border referendum which favoured re-unification, the result of that could lead to widespread civil unrest and a total breakdown of law and order, on a much more devastating scale than anything seen during the Troubles.
That can be averted through careful planning and by finding ways of easing the shockwaves. A long transition period where change was brought about very slowly might be a good way to go.Ireland can learn from the Brexit fiasco. In other words before a border poll is held, the knowledge that little will change immediately might ease a lot of unionist apprehension.
 

former wesleyan

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What are " unionist fears " ? Don't want any hand , act nor part in a UI has little to do with fears afaik.
 

Mickeymac

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This quote is the winner.

“Irish unity by numbers won’t work. We made that mistake 100 years ago, when Northern Ireland was set up on the basis of a head count.

“We” had no say. The division of our Country was rammed down our throats.

Nail on head sir, now all it needs is for that mistake to be rectified.
 

Marcella

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They can like it or go back home once the time comes.
They can accept it or do an Arlene Foster and head back across the water.

Their brexit friends I’m sure will welcome the new immigrants...
 

Marcella

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What are " unionist fears " ? Don't want any hand , act nor part in a UI has little to do with fears afaik.
You’re probably right for the most part. Which is why Mallon’s suggestion unionists have to be brought on board is in effect a permanent veto on Irish reunification.
 

raetsel

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What are " unionist fears " ? Don't want any hand , act nor part in a UI has little to do with fears afaik.
Unionism accepted that Irish unity was a future possibility when they signed up to the GFA in 1998. Just repeating the word "no" isn't going to hold back what looks almost inevitable.
It is time that responsible unionist leaders openly accepted the Irish unity may well happen, and started talking about it to their own people. The problem at the moment is that the current leader of the biggest unionist party, when asked to consider the possibility, first of all dodged the question by saying that she didn't believe it would ever happen, and when pressed further, said that if it ever did happen she couldn't accept it and would move to Britain.
Unionist politicians seem to believe that to even acknowledge the possibility of a united Ireland is a sign of weakness. It is a totally irresponsible position.
 

AhNowStop

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A lot of what Seamus Mallon says in this article makes perfect sense. Of course a broad base of support for reunification should be built and unionist fears need to be addressed.

However his basic contention that a simple majority in favour of reunification can not warrant such an outcome is completely at odds with the terms of the Good Friday agreement.

In effect, Mallon, wants to hand unionists a veto on Irish reunification.

This isn’t the first time such comments have been forthcoming. Enda Kenny, Bertie Ahern and Leo Varadkar have all made similar comments in the past.

Such an assertion is morally and legally in direct contravention of the GFA. A key component of which was to offer Irish nationalists a clear and unambiguous path to a United Ireland.

To have a former leader of nationalism and an architect of the GFA to completely undermine a key tenet of the agreement is hard to understand and justify.

As we approach the demographic tipping point in the north the attempts to change the goal posts need to be vigorously and democratically resisted.

The principle of consent must be safe guarded from an Irish political class that seems hell bent on appeasing unionism at the expense of democracy in Ireland.
Poor aul Seamus wants to push his book ... thankfully he's an irrelevance
 

AhNowStop

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That is the problem right there it was the people of N Ireland not nationalists, a United Ireland for Nationalists only?
Do you believe in democracy ? .. or do you believe that unionist votes trump nationalist votes ?
 

AhNowStop

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If democracy doesn't matter, and unionists can just get their way, no matter what, then what's the point in peace?
This is EXACTLY what the issue is .. either democracy "works" or it doesnt .. if it doesnt an alternative will undoubtedly replace it.
 
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AhNowStop

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This quote is the winner.

“Irish unity by numbers won’t work. We made that mistake 100 years ago, when Northern Ireland was set up on the basis of a head count.

“We” had no say. The division of our Country was rammed down our throats.
Exactly .. non democratic means were used to manufacture the NI statelet and now some of these loons want non democratic means to maintain the unionist hegemony ,.,.....

they're having a fookin laugh :rolleyes:


edit - not that it matters what these loons say .. its all there in the GFA.
 


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