Unionist Bonfires - Culture or Bigotry?

Conuil

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As hundreds of Bonfires across the North will be lit tonight on the eve of July 12 'celebrations' of the Battle of the Boyne.

Speaking earlier today, Stormont's environment committee chairman, Patsy McGlone, said the Bonfires caused serious health concerns for residents living close to these 'towers of hate' that are piled high with thousands of toxic tyres in Antrim. Some debris are also the height of two houses and there have been calls for them to be demolished to protect people living nearby.

Mr McGlone said: "It makes a mockery of statutory agencies where these thugs are intimidating the people of their own areas to erect these things close to houses. The issue should be looked at in the context of environmental governance in terms of cutting carbon emissions from events sponsored by local councils."

Even though its illegal to burn tyres but the PSNI must receive complaints from local people before they act. Though, many are unwilling to come forward as the UDA and UVF organise the Bonfires.

"Council officials have been commissioned to draw up eco-friendly guidelines for funding and the conditions for funding were to be that they comply with the environmental targets," he added.

The proposals were supported by every party except the DUP. While other Parties, refuse to recognise the dangers of tyres being added to bonfires and refuse to enter into dialogue to end the practice.

Should District Councils stop funding for those Loyalist and Unionist communities who annually. Emit a massive cloud of carbon into our atmosphere?
 


Conuil

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Conuil said:
As hundreds of Bonfires across the North will be lit tonight on the eve of July 12 'celebrations' of the Battle of the Boyne.

Speaking earlier today, Stormont's environment committee chairman, Patsy McGlone, said the Bonfires caused serious health concerns for residents living close to these 'towers of hate' that are piled high with thousands of toxic tyres in Antrim. Some debris are also the height of two houses and there have been calls for them to be demolished to protect people living nearby.

Mr McGlone said: "It makes a mockery of statutory agencies where these thugs are intimidating the people of their own areas to erect these things close to houses. The issue should be looked at in the context of environmental governance in terms of cutting carbon emissions from events sponsored by local councils."

Even though its illegal to burn tyres but the PSNI must receive complaints from local people before they act. Though, many are unwilling to come forward as the UDA and UVF organise the Bonfires.

"Council officials have been commissioned to draw up eco-friendly guidelines for funding and the conditions for funding were to be that they comply with the environmental targets," he added.

The proposals were supported by every party except the DUP. While other Parties, refuse to recognise the dangers of tyres being added to bonfires and refuse to enter into dialogue to end the practice.

Should District Councils stop funding for those Loyalist and Unionist communities who annually. Emit a massive cloud of carbon into our atmosphere?
In addition to the above;
Legal threat over toxic bonfires

One of the biggest eleventh night bonfires on the Ballycraigy estate in Antrim, Northern Ireland.

The public has been urged to help bring those responsible for burning illegal materials on eleventh night bonfires before the courts.
Anne Blacker, of the DoE, said a difficulty in persuading witnesses to come forward made it hard to bring prosecutions.

On Wednesday, concerns were raised about a large bonfire in Antrim which contains hundreds of rubber tyres.

Ms Blacker said the situation had "caused a lot of frustration".

Residents in the Ballycraigy area of Antrim, where the bonfire has been built, have said that apart from damage to the environment, they fear the toxic fumes given off by the fire could damage their health.

SDLP assembly member for South Antrim Tommy Burns said more should be done to protect the public.

"There are thousands of tyres and thousands of pallets in the Ballycraigy bonfire and in a few hours it will be poisoning people over a huge area," he said.

"This is not about culture, it is about law-breaking."

A spokesman for the Department of Environment said that despite illegal materials being burned on the bonfire, it would not be extinguished unless it became an issue of public safety.

Antrim Ulster Unionist councillor Drew Ritchie, head of the town's bonfire committee, said they would work to ensure next year's fire would be tyre-free.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/6291418.stm
 

Gombeen

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Conuil said:
"Council officials have been commissioned to draw up eco-friendly guidelines for funding and the conditions for funding were to be that they comply with the environmental targets," he added.

?
Asking the loyalists to 'go green'?! They won't like that, in more ways than one. :lol:
 

bobbysands81

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It's simple - they should be banned due to the sectarianism, bigotry, racism and for the environmental reasons surrounding them.
 

Helium Three

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If the local authorities insist on standing idly by while people are poisoned and the vulnerable sicken and die here's a cross border suggestion.

The EPA in the south is gung ho on terrifying people down here about the danger of what they call backyard burning. (OK they are doing it as part of a softening up process to sell the daft idea of burning waste in commercial incinerators but let's take them at face value for a minute).

So here's the thing - as a token of the EPA's regret for allowing so much illegal waste from their jurisdiction to be dumped north-west of the Border why don't they go into the Loyalist areas and sort them out - in hot pursuit you might say.
 

michael1965

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There's a picture of one of these bonfires, with alternating layers of wooden pallets and tyres in one of today's papers. It's a shocking sight and I wouldn't like to be anywhere within miles of it.

I have to say it's a bit odd, that this issue (which poses a real threat to people's health) doesn't seem to get anything like the amount of complaints as compared to the marching business.
 

Cookie68

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RTE showed a couple of the bonfires that were prepared. They did look monstrous and the fumes from all those tyres must be horrific.

While it is a matter to be discussed by the people of Northern Ireland I do find the burning of the flag of the Republic Of Ireland quite offensive and unnecessary. What kind of repugnant mentality is that? :roll: Leave us out of it please.

Fine, celebrate your culture, come and march and bang your lambegs in Dublin if you feel the need but burning the Tricolour should be against the law for obvious reasons, especially in this day and age.
 

belfastlad

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If the one on the shankill road gets out of control (which is a good chance as there is literally enough wood there to fill a street of houses) the whole place will go up in smoke
 

rockofcashel

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I think it is a little bit of both i.e. culture and bigotry. However, I wouldn't stop Loyalist people from having bonfires or celebrating the 12th just for the sake if it.

As much as we may not like it, they do celebrate the 12th and have every right to do so.

However, on a practical level, the tyre tower shown on the news tonight was really a little bit over the top. I mean from a public safety point of view from possible fire hazard, and most definitely from smoke inhalation and environmental hazard, no fire should be allowed to burn that big.

I also think, and no one has commented yet on it, but the tri-colour with the letters "KAT" across it should have been removed by the PSNI, and the First Minister Mr. Paisley should condemn its use and connotations.
 

Cookie68

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rockofcashel said:
I also think, and no one has commented yet on it, but the tri-colour with the letters "KAT" across it should have been removed by the PSNI, and the First Minister Mr. Paisley should condemn its use and connotations.
I was wondering what that stood for. They don't burn fenian pussies do they? ;)
 

Helium Three

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rockofcashel said:
I think it is a little bit of both i.e. culture and bigotry. However, I wouldn't stop Loyalist people from having bonfires or celebrating the 12th just for the sake if it.

As much as we may not like it, they do celebrate the 12th and have every right to do so.

....

I also think, and no one has commented yet on it, but the tri-colour with the letters "KAT" across it should have been removed by the PSNI, and the First Minister Mr. Paisley should condemn its use and connotations.
Guessing here - Kill all Taigs?
 

rockofcashel

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Cookie68 said:
rockofcashel said:
I also think, and no one has commented yet on it, but the tri-colour with the letters "KAT" across it should have been removed by the PSNI, and the First Minister Mr. Paisley should condemn its use and connotations.
I was wondering what that stood for. They don't burn fenian pussies do they? ;)
Do you actually think that's funny?

You might want to have a read back to this.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/events/north ... 131278.stm
 

Cookie68

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rockofcashel said:
Cookie68 said:
rockofcashel said:
I also think, and no one has commented yet on it, but the tri-colour with the letters "KAT" across it should have been removed by the PSNI, and the First Minister Mr. Paisley should condemn its use and connotations.
I was wondering what that stood for. They don't burn fenian pussies do they? ;)
Do you actually think that's funny?

You might want to have a read back to this.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/events/north ... 131278.stm
What does KAT stand for? Sorry if I'm not au fait with the minutae of northern tribalism.

I find the burning of the Tricolour offensive as I have said. As for KAT I'm none the wiser after reading the article about that horrific arson attack.
 

rockofcashel

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Don't play the gobshite with me Cookie.

I'd ask that you go back up and edit your last post and take the winking smilie off of it.

I am sure you know full well that "KAT" stands for Kill All Taigs.
 

Cookie68

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rockofcashel said:
Don't play the gobshite with me Cookie.

I'd ask that you go back up and edit your last post and take the winking smilie off of it.

I am sure you know full well that "KAT" stands for Kill All Taigs.
I might not agree with your politics but we're on the same side on this issue. I find it repulsive and indicative of a sick mentality that is being handed down to younger generations. They are of course entitled to teach their kids about their heritage but this is wrong.


( I did not know what KAT stood for and I don't understand your aggression towards me in this post. )
 

rockofcashel

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well fair enough if you didn't understand it, but I thought you were making a joke of the reference. The weekend of the Twelfth is a notoriously dangerous time for Catholics in the 6 counties, and certainly isn't a laughing matter.
 

Cookie68

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rockofcashel said:
well fair enough if you didn't understand it, but I thought you were making a joke of the reference. The weekend of the Twelfth is a notoriously dangerous time for Catholics in the 6 counties, and certainly isn't a laughing matter.
What I don't understand is why the Tricolour is permitted to be burned in Northern Ireland. I would not like to see the UJ burned here and expect the same of British people. However, some of the residents of some of the estates in question might not be the brightest that NI has produced.
 

st333ve

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Just got home from work, drove past 3 bonfires on the way home, drunken kids all over the roads, the polish i bring home from work where sh1tting themselves driving through these crowds of thugs, and so was i (my car hasnt been going so well lately)
Fires can be seen in the distance and smoke plummets up everywhere while you drive under the orange arches showing pictures of coffins and skull and bones with fire and all.
Its like something out of hell or a horror movie around the north tonight.
A girl was threatened not to go to work tomorrow as all fenians are getting their car blocked or stoned if they go to work.
Im picking her up at 9 and im going to fukin work, i dont care if its in a loyalist area its double time and an extra holiday and i need the money, fuk em!
Seriously, its quite a surreal hateful sight out there tonight, lock the doors and close the shutters.
 

st333ve

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Cookie68 said:
rockofcashel said:
well fair enough if you didn't understand it, but I thought you were making a joke of the reference. The weekend of the Twelfth is a notoriously dangerous time for Catholics in the 6 counties, and certainly isn't a laughing matter.
What I don't understand is why the Tricolour is permitted to be burned in Northern Ireland. I would not like to see the UJ burned here and expect the same of British people. However, some of the residents of some of the estates in question might not be the brightest that NI has produced.
HA ha," NI " has permitted a lot worse, they also burn the EU flag and many other old gaelic flags etc.
 


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