Unionists and indeed loyalists already nursing a sense of betrayal

McSlaggart

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The comments clash with statements from the British Government that there will not be a border down the Irish Sea, something repeated by the Northern Irish Secretary Brandon Lewis both in Parliament and to the Northern Irish media in recent days.
Yet the gap between rhetoric and reality is increasingly stark.
The laying of the foundations at the new facilities which will be required to process the goods will be yet another blow to the Conservative’s flagging unionist bona fides and is another dent to the Prime Minister’s credibility; a penny for the thoughts of those Northern Irish businesspeople who feature in a clip which has reappeared on social media in which the Prime Minister tells them there would be no need to fill in any customs forms.
Whether the Conservatives are particularly fussed about this is a moot point. There was an illustrative moment this week when Simon Hoare, Chair of the Northern Ireland Select Committee, dismissed an attempt by the DUP’s Gregory Campbell to ask Brandon Lewis about the “sea border”, claiming it a “tangential” issue.
12 months ago Campbell and his colleagues were darlings of the ERG et al, now their concerns are an afterthought.
The debate around whether the DUP wasted its leverage at Westminster from 2017 to 2019 is a valid one.
However, it is worth noting that many of those who took on an activist role regarding the economic and social impacts of an Irish land border are now complaining equally hard about the prospect of this arrangement between Northern Ireland and Great Britain.
Brexit is of course the root of this vexatious issue, but there have been plenty of people who have shepherded Northern Ireland along the road to this state of limbo.
That aside, it cannot be doubted that unionists are now twisting in the wind.
Amid the fire and brimstone from some quarters that greeted Kearney’s intervention, there was an admission from the Ulster Unionist leader Steve Aiken that in his view, an “Irish Sea border is now a certainty”. Less “never, never, never”, more resigned acceptance.
However, there appears to be an expectation from sections of unionism that the fight against this must go on.
Indeed, Kearney said that the Government “will urgently put in place detailed plans with the Executive”, a point which was picked up by Jim Allister, the leader of Traditional Unionist Voice and a thorny bete noire in the side of establishment unionism.
The Executive – which includes both the DUP and UUP - will have some role to play in this new normal. If they are seen to be facilitating this then as Allister points out, it will “test the mettle of unionists”.
With the locus of power having definitively shifted away from Belfast, the DUP’s objective will likely be on damage limitation with regards to the obtrusiveness of these arrangements.
There are obvious economic incentives yet from the perspective of self-preservation, failure to do so will only further alienate some unionists and indeed loyalists already nursing a sense of betrayal. Barring a change in fortunes – or indeed an extension – it is likely there will be some explaining to do come January 2021.



Andrew McQuillan works in public affairs and writes extensively on Northern Ireland
 


Sync

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I mean the Tories can validly argue that the DUP betrayed them first, cost them a Prime Minister, delayed a deal and has left them in a weaker negotiating point.
 

blinding

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I suppose the Brits could invade the 26 Counties and get rid of the 6 County Border ! Sure FFG would love that !

They would be practicing their bowing, scraping and curtsying straight away ! ! !
 

McSlaggart

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I mean the Tories can validly argue that the DUP betrayed them first, cost them a Prime Minister, delayed a deal and has left them in a weaker negotiating point.

The conservatives never live up to agreements they have with unionism. 1 In this instance I do not think the DUP members in parliament have the personal skills needed to make friends and influence people. This is a personal view but I have never heard anyone say they enjoyed being in the company of an elected representative of that political party.




1

"
The exchanges between Boris Johnson and the DUP in the House of Commons on Saturday were short and terse, but they struck a loud death knell for the relationship of convenience that had existed between them.

DUP MPs ranted and raved with all the exasperation of a party that believed they hadn’t brought this on themselves.

The word “betrayal” hung in the air, and other words sprung to mind too:


“What a fool I was! I was only a puppet, and so was Ulster, and so was Ireland, in the political game that was to get the Conservative Party into power.”


This was not the cry of Arlene Foster after reading Boris Johnson’s new Brexit deal, but rather from a 1921 speech by Edward Carson,
the grandfather of unionism. His party members were once again propping up Tory votes, only for the coalition government to oversee the partition of Ireland. Over the past century, despite their allegiance to Britain, Northern Ireland’s unionists have often feared another betrayal of British politicians."

 

Uganda

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The conservatives never live up to agreements they have with unionism. 1 In this instance I do not think the DUP members in parliament have the personal skills needed to make friends and influence people. This is a personal view but I have never heard anyone say they enjoyed being in the company of an elected representative of that political party.




1

"
The exchanges between Boris Johnson and the DUP in the House of Commons on Saturday were short and terse, but they struck a loud death knell for the relationship of convenience that had existed between them.

DUP MPs ranted and raved with all the exasperation of a party that believed they hadn’t brought this on themselves.

The word “betrayal” hung in the air, and other words sprung to mind too:


“What a fool I was! I was only a puppet, and so was Ulster, and so was Ireland, in the political game that was to get the Conservative Party into power.”


This was not the cry of Arlene Foster after reading Boris Johnson’s new Brexit deal, but rather from a 1921 speech by Edward Carson,
the grandfather of unionism. His party members were once again propping up Tory votes, only for the coalition government to oversee the partition of Ireland. Over the past century, despite their allegiance to Britain, Northern Ireland’s unionists have often feared another betrayal of British politicians."

between Brexit and the Covid cockup on Johnson’s part can the day be too far off when some unionists will begin to wonder if, bad and all the Republic may be, would they be better off throwing their lot in with us than the tories?
 

McSlaggart

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between Brexit and the Covid cockup on Johnson’s part can the day be too far off when some unionists will begin to wonder if, bad and all the Republic may be, would they be better off throwing their lot in with us than the tories?

The two things that are happening is the large number of young unionists who move to the "mainland" never to return. The second is unionism inability to come to terms with having to make "Northern Ireland" more acceptable to the wider society. How many images of unionist politicians lighting fires with Irish flags on does it take for them to change their ways.


DUP Deputy Mayor apologises for photo standing beside Irish Tricolour burning on bonfire
A DUP Deputy Lord Mayor has apologised for posting photographs on social media, including one of a burning Irish tricolour.

 

bang bang

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The two things that are happening is the large number of young unionists who move to the "mainland" never to return. The second is unionism inability to come to terms with having to make "Northern Ireland" more acceptable to the wider society. How many images of unionist politicians lighting fires with Irish flags on does it take for them to change their ways.


DUP Deputy Mayor apologises for photo standing beside Irish Tricolour burning on bonfire
A DUP Deputy Lord Mayor has apologised for posting photographs on social media, including one of a burning Irish tricolour.

Indeed, they will never learn. I believe it's a moot point now as a UI is firmly on the horizon.
It's what they do in the aftermath of a successful border poll, that will be interesting.
How many for example will head to "Finchley" with Arlene. Will the British government help with relocation of those who don't wish to remain, I also believe there is a section of the Unionist community, the more pragmatic section who will want to help make the new Ireland a place in which they comfortably live and positively contribute to.
 

RasherHash

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46 years ago today 17th May 1974 Dublin & Monaghan were rocked by bombs.
33 civilians & an unborn child were killed in the carnage as a result of a series of explosions when four car bombs were planted by Loyalist paramilitaries in Dublin & Monaghan.
258 people were also injured Paddy McKenna 🇮🇪 on Twitter
 

blinding

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@paddymac1
46 years ago today 17th May 1974 Dublin & Monaghan were rocked by bombs.
33 civilians & an unborn child were killed in the carnage as a result of a series of explosions when four car bombs were planted by Loyalist paramilitaries in Dublin & Monaghan.
258 people were also injured Paddy McKenna 🇮🇪 on Twitter
A Terrible Atrocity covered up by FFG and the Irish Labour Party. Shameful.
 

Levellers

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Well known hurler on the ditch Edward Carson told them in 1921:

"What a fool I was. I was only a puppet, and so was Ulster, and so was Ireland, in the political game that was to get the Conservative Party into power."
 

McTell

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Time for a charm offensive by our brethren in the 6 counties.

The troubles delayed everything, and we can't blame them or ourselves for not signing up for the SF formula of a soviet supported cuban-type republic.

And not forgetting the catholic-assumed-nationalists who will not vote to end the subsidy from london. All you have to do is buy a bag of groceries at tesco in newry, and the same items at tesco in dundalk, and count the difference. Nothing to do with religion, history, flags and all that, more about surviving in what has always been a poor corner of the island.
 

Mickeymac

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Time for a charm offensive by our brethren in the 6 counties.

The troubles delayed everything, and we can't blame them or ourselves for not signing up for the SF formula of a soviet supported cuban-type republic.

And not forgetting the catholic-assumed-nationalists who will not vote to end the subsidy from london. All you have to do is buy a bag of groceries at tesco in newry, and the same items at tesco in dundalk, and count the difference. Nothing to do with religion, history, flags and all that, more about surviving in what has always been a poor corner of the island.

What is this “handout from London” you mentioned above and how much is it?
 

McSlaggart

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Time for a charm offensive by our brethren in the 6 counties.

The troubles delayed everything, and we can't blame them or ourselves for not signing up for the SF formula of a soviet supported cuban-type republic.

And not forgetting the catholic-assumed-nationalists who will not vote to end the subsidy from london. All you have to do is buy a bag of groceries at tesco in newry, and the same items at tesco in dundalk, and count the difference. Nothing to do with religion, history, flags and all that, more about surviving in what has always been a poor corner of the island.
Do you have anything to support your assertion that ulster has always been a poor corner of the Island?
 
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Sync

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Or y'know...I didn't say it.
 

IvoShandor

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yes
I suppose the Brits could invade the 26 Counties and get rid of the 6 County Border ! Sure FFG would love that !

They would be practicing their bowing, scraping and curtsying straight away ! ! !
It's good to see consistency from you, Blinding. You talk the same unadulterated horsesh1t here as you do on every other thread.
 

raetsel

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Time for a charm offensive by our brethren in the 6 counties.

The troubles delayed everything, and we can't blame them or ourselves for not signing up for the SF formula of a soviet supported cuban-type republic.

And not forgetting the catholic-assumed-nationalists who will not vote to end the subsidy from london. All you have to do is buy a bag of groceries at tesco in newry, and the same items at tesco in dundalk, and count the difference. Nothing to do with religion, history, flags and all that, more about surviving in what has always been a poor corner of the island.
But that's not true. As David McWilliams has pointed out in the past greater Belfast was Ireland's economic powerhouse and accounted for 80% of the island's industrial output before partition.
Partition gradually strangled the northern economy and made it poor. It follows that the cure for that is reunification. I'd happily face a decade of economic austerity that could be expected to follow unity in exchange for the prospect of long term gain.
 


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