United Ireland is granted mainstream legitimacy

McSlaggart

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The call for a united Ireland, then, is no longer the sole domain of Sinn Féin. It is still a distant reality – unionists still outnumber nationalists in the north. But, when that case is made by Varadkar and Coveney, moderates who don’t come from a republican tradition are more likely to listen. The prospect of a united Ireland is granted mainstream legitimacy.

As Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil reclaim the republican mantle from the fringes of Irish politics, parties across the UK concerned for the survival of the Union should be wary. The concern is no longer a banner reading “England get out of Ireland”. It’s that nationalism is finding a credible face.


It is time Unionists forget about Boris and worry more about local jobs and the Farming industry.

The DUP should ask Boris "Where's The Beef?"
 


Lumpy Talbot

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No
It is a remarkable thing politically that the Conservative and Unionist Party should be the ones who place a suspect device under the Union itself.

At no point does it appear that much thought has been given to a regulatory impact assessment to shake out the implications of Brexit in this respect. If an RIA had been attempted it is likely the strain on the Union would have surfaced around Northern Ireland, Scotland, and even Wales.

The Whistful Thinking mob have taken over the Tory party and I see very little indication of strategy behind it other than a weariness of thinking and a desire to let that ever-present backseat driver in Conservatism take the wheel. Only problem is that Nostalgia can't drive.
 

former wesleyan

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A United Ireland simply means going from a partitioned state to a single bi-national state. Historically, how many of those have worked out in the long term ?
 

Sync

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The UK, the US, Italy, Vietnam, Greece, Germany, Romania, Canada. I mean....lots?
 

belcoo666

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A United Ireland simply means going from a partitioned state to a single bi-national state. Historically, how many of those have worked out in the long term ?
A United Ireland simply means going from an ARTIFICIALLY partitioned state to a single re unified state
If you and your fellow loyalists dont like it go back to where you came from
 

former wesleyan

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The UK, the US, Italy, Vietnam, Greece, Germany, Romania, Canada. I mean....lots?
How is the US a bi-national state ? Or Vietnam where everyone is Vietnamese ? Or Germany where everyone is German ? Even Canada has a potential split in the Free Quebeq movement. Why did Cyprus not hang together ? Czechoslovakia ? Yugoslavia ?
 

redneck

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Personally I would rather see An Gaeilge used more than a "United Ireland". When an Acht na Gaeilge and other issues are addressed in N.I than you will have a better state. What Republicans fail to realise is when FFg talk about a united Ireland, they are not talking about Dublin rule, they are talking about rejoining the UK. For example to have Prince Charles as head of state.
Not President Michael Dee Higgins. Slán
 

Pyewacket

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A United Ireland simply means going from a partitioned state to a single bi-national state. Historically, how many of those have worked out in the long term ?
How would a UI be a bi national state? Where did you get that little notion from?
 

firefly123

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A United Ireland simply means going from a partitioned state to a single bi-national state. Historically, how many of those have worked out in the long term ?
interesting post. Can you elaborate a bit?
Are you suggesting the unionist community simply couldn't live in a unified ireland? Would you suggest mass exodus to the 'mainland' or some form of repartition in the event of unification?
 

firefly123

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Personally I would rather see An Gaeilge used more than a "United Ireland". When an Acht na Gaeilge and other issues are addressed in N.I than you will have a better state. What Republicans fail to realise is when FFg talk about a united Ireland, they are not talking about Dublin rule, they are talking about rejoining the UK. For example to have Prince Charles as head of state.
Not President Michael Dee Higgins. Slán
That's utter garbage.


That is all.
 

redneck

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I like the idea of a United Ireland. But going back in our history, this country was never united.
From 1200's onwards to the 1500's there was the Pale, in North Leinster.
From 1600's onwards to today there was the Plantation of Ulster.
 

redneck

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The best solution to me is a kind of Federal Ireland, with small parliments in the 4 provinces. And probably a defence pact with England/UK.
 

SgtBilko

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The best solution to me is a kind of Federal Ireland, with small parliments in the 4 provinces. And probably a defence pact with England/UK.
You're close to perfection but not quite. Rather than 4 small provincial 'parliaments', how about two slightly larger ones? We could have one in the south, say Dublin, governing the bulk of those who do not identify as British and one in North, say in Belfast, governing those who do. Anyone in the North, who'd rather be governed by the Southern state always have the option of heading south. Simple.
 
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Herr Rommel

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Once the lads up North know that they will have little say in how things are run after reunification there should be no problem. The English have wanted shot of the North for years and they would be happy to see the northern problem removed.

Not trolling and I wasn't trolling in my first post which was deleted. No prizes for guessing which mod did that.
 

SgtBilko

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The English have wanted shot of the North for years and they would be happy to see the northern problem removed
🙄How many years have we been hearing that myth? This is the same 'English' that sent tens of thousands of troops to keep the place British. There has been ample opportunity for them to 'get rid' over the past 99 years. They haven't even came close to doing so and indeed, the current Prime Minister stated only this week that he 'would not entertain the idea of a border poll'.

You are kidding yourself.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
It was also the position of past Prime Ministers that there would be no referendum on EU membership.

But there was one in the end.
 

firefly123

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🙄How many years have we been hearing that myth? This is the same 'English' that sent tens of thousands of troops to keep the place British. There has been ample opportunity for them to 'get rid' over the past 99 years. They haven't even came close to doing so and indeed, the current Prime Minister stated only this week that he 'would not entertain the idea of a border poll'.

You are kidding yourself.
You ever heard of mission creep?
 

Barroso

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You're close to perfection but not quite. Rather than 4 small provincial 'parliaments', how about two slightly larger ones? We could have one in the south, say Dublin, governing the bulk of those who do not identify as British and one in North, say in Belfast, governing those who do. Anyone in the North, who'd rather be governed by the Southern state always have the option of heading south. Simple.
Now there's a smart thought.
I wonder why nobody ever thought of it before?
 

Paddyc

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You're close to perfection but not quite. Rather than 4 small provincial 'parliaments', how about two slightly larger ones? We could have one in the south, say Dublin, governing the bulk of those who do not identify as British and one in North, say in Belfast, governing those who do. Anyone in the North, who'd rather be governed by the Southern state always have the option of heading south. Simple.
Would the one in Belfast only cover those counties / constituencies / local electoral areas with a majority of people who identify as British ?

1564838016729.png
 

SgtBilko

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Would the one in Belfast only cover those counties / constituencies / local electoral areas with a majority of people who identify as British ?

1564838016729.png
No. I go for the six counties in the North East. Everyone born in those six counties are British Citizens by birth, so that's a good starting point. Anyone not wishing to be considered British are free to head south, were they can be as Irish as they want. 👍
 


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