Upcoming Referenda and the slow lingering Death of Bunreacht na hEireann v1.0

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to quote:
“The pro-life message has been, for the last 40-something years, that the fetus … is a life, and it is a human life worthy of all the rights the rest of us have,” she said. “That’s been more of an abstract concept until the last decade or so.” But, she added, “when you’re seeing a baby sucking its thumb at 18 weeks, smiling, clapping,” it becomes “harder to square the idea that that 20-week-old, that unborn baby or fetus, is discardable.”
Foetus, ffs. This is not America.
 


Mitsui2

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to quote:
“The pro-life message has been, for the last 40-something years, that the fetus … is a life, and it is a human life worthy of all the rights the rest of us have,” she said. “That’s been more of an abstract concept until the last decade or so.” But, she added, “when you’re seeing a baby sucking its thumb at 18 weeks, smiling, clapping,” it becomes “harder to square the idea that that 20-week-old, that unborn baby or fetus, is discardable.”
"Clapping"?

A 20-week-old foetus clapping?

Mirabile dictu!
 

lostexpectation

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is getting rid of article 41.2 giving up any possible leverage people have with the state to support carers in the future, gov rushing to remove it now as if its pro-women when its really about saving the state money.
 

Orbit v2

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The advantage of drip-drip amendments is that they are more likely to succeed. Rewriting the whole thing from scratch, or large scale "reform" (whatever that really means) would be doomed with zero chance of passing.
 

Fr. Hank Tree

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We have had the referendum to repeal the 8th Amendment of the Constitution passed by a roughly 2 to 1 majority in the last few weeks. This has been a slow process since its inclusion in Bunreacht in 1983, via rejection of the 12th amendment in 1992, the adoption of the 13th and 14th amendment (also 1992) to remove barriers to travelling for and the obtaining/distribution of information regarding termination of pregnancy.

We may feel somewhat secular, liberal and modern in light of the removal of the eighth amendment, and in truth we are moving in that direction, but the influence of Christianity - and Catholicism in particular - are still writ large throughout the current document. It is thought – though it cannot be certain – that due to the secrecy that De Valera maintained around the drafting process, that this influence came through submissions from a Fr. Edward Cahill SJ, and from the contemporary eminence grise the then Fr. John Charles McQuaid, who is reputed to have deluged the process with submissions.

Let us examine the influence of the church on this most important of documents.
Firstly, we have the preamble:

In the name of the Most Holy Trinity, from Whom is all authority and to Whom, as our final end, all actions both of men and States must be referred,
We, the people of Éire,
Humbly acknowledging all our obligations to our Divine Lord, Jesus Christ, Who sustained our fathers through centuries of trial,
Gratefully remembering their heroic and unremitting struggle to regain the rightful independence of our Nation,
And seeking to promote the common good, with due observance of Prudence, Justice and Charity, so that the dignity and freedom of the individual may be assured, true social order attained, the unity of our country restored, and concord established with other nations,
Do hereby adopt, enact, and give to ourselves this Constitution.


So, before the document has even begun, we have ceded authority to God, and by referencing the trinity, the Christian God.

Article 41 in its original form specifically bars divorce – the stated position of the RCC. This took until 1995 to remove, condemning thousands of people to remain in broken marriages.

The children’s rights amendment, we find was challenged on a spurious basis by the same woman who is now challenging the outcome of the repeal referendum, delaying its imposition for the guts of three years. So we can see that the lunatic fringe of Catholicism is trying its damnedest to hold back the tide of the secularisation of the state.

In October, we will have three referenda at once – a proposed amendment to the clause dealing with the position of women in the home, a proposed amendement to remove the offense of blasphemy (pretty much a done deal as this is largely covered by hate speech law) and will prevent such things as the spurious investigation of Stephen Fry. Finally there will be referendum on directly elected mayors. The first two of these represent a further stepping away from the church of the state.

Still, there is much to do. We need to divest the churches from their postions of power an influence within Education and Health, where untold abuses have taken place, and the stench of corruption remains around the findings of historical enquiries.

This is not to do down the church, which in my opinion has a valuable role to play in society, but in a modern democracy, it has no formal role in the running of the state.

Is it time to bite the bullet, and completely reform Bunreacht na hEireann, rather than this drip, drip, drip of reform?

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Ireland_(original_text)

https://www.taoiseach.gov.ie/DOT/en...ution_of_Ireland_-_Bunreacht_na_hÉireann.html
Highly ideological post. In the same way that Brexiteers think leaving the EU will solve their problems, an increasing number of people here seem to be fixated on this idea of secularisation as a sort of necessary first step to solving all our problems.
 


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