Valentia Observatory: Centennial and One Hundred Years of Climate Change

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
48,829
It is good to be able to post on a successful Irish science story, this one of an Irish Observatory which has made a significant contribution to the monitoring of global weather and climate.

Milestone in Irish weather and climate observations: Recognition of Met Éireann’s Valentia Observatory as a Centennial Station by the World Meteorological Organisation

The World Meteorological Organization has awarded Valentia Observatory a certificate of accreditation as a Centennial Station in acknowledgement of over 100 years of high quality continuous meteorological observations. President of Ireland Michael D. Higgins visited Valentia Observatory, Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry on Saturday, 17th February 2018 to commemorate this. The President unveiled a plaque marking the achievement.

(The Observatory is now actually now sited by the town of Caherciveen, adjacent to Valentia Island, the original site)

Milestone in Irish weather and climate observations: Recognition of Met Éireann

Air Temperature - Climate - Met Éireann - The Irish Meteorological Service Online

Report on today's Six=One News (towards the end): https://www.rte.ie/player/ie/show/rte-news-six-one-30003249/10840707/

The continuous record from Valentia, showing a rise in temperature over the last century.



Overall, that tracks very well with the national average of about a 0.75C rise since 1930.

 


Mushroom

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 27, 2009
Messages
15,474
Fair play to the British for setting it up.:cool:
And to the South Kerry Brigade of the IRA for not blowing it up during the Civil War!
 

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
4,403
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
I know why it's there (because it was where the transAtlantic telegraph came ashore). I know that the Knight of Kerry (the banking Fitzgeralds, local landlords) provided the original accommodation. I know that TCD were somehow involved in equipping it. I know that Admiral Robert Fitzroy's mother was a Londonderry Stewart (and half-sister of the execrable Castlereagh), and his wife was an O'Brien.

Now can someone explain the Italianite 'Valentia' name, please?
 

Mushroom

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 27, 2009
Messages
15,474
Now can someone explain the Italianate 'Valentia' name, please?
Seemingly it's phonetic. Said to come from the Irish béal inse (mouth of the island) or bhaile inse spoken in a soft Kerry dialect.
 

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
48,829
And to the South Kerry Brigade of the IRA for not blowing it up during the Civil War!
They (i.e. Republicans) did burn down the Marconi Wireless Station in Clifden, so I suppose Caherciveen was lucky.
 

Betson

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
17,350
It is good to be able to post on a successful Irish science story, this one of an Irish Observatory which has made a significant contribution to the monitoring of global weather and climate.

Milestone in Irish weather and climate observations: Recognition of Met Éireann’s Valentia Observatory as a Centennial Station by the World Meteorological Organisation

The World Meteorological Organization has awarded Valentia Observatory a certificate of accreditation as a Centennial Station in acknowledgement of over 100 years of high quality continuous meteorological observations. President of Ireland Michael D. Higgins visited Valentia Observatory, Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry on Saturday, 17th February 2018 to commemorate this. The President unveiled a plaque marking the achievement.

(The Observatory is now actually now sited by the town of Caherciveen, adjacent to Valentia Island, the original site)

Milestone in Irish weather and climate observations: Recognition of Met Éireann

Air Temperature - Climate - Met Éireann - The Irish Meteorological Service Online

Report on today's Six=One News (towards the end): https://www.rte.ie/player/ie/show/rte-news-six-one-30003249/10840707/

The continuous record from Valentia, showing a rise in temperature over the last century.



Overall, that tracks very well with the national average of about a 0.75C rise since 1930.

Well done you finally posted a post that did not have anti Trump theme to it.
 

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
48,829
I know why it's there (because it was where the transAtlantic telegraph came ashore). I know that the Knight of Kerry (the banking Fitzgeralds, local landlords) provided the original accommodation. I know that TCD were somehow involved in equipping it. I know that Admiral Robert Fitzroy's mother was a Londonderry Stewart (and half-sister of the execrable Castlereagh), and his wife was an O'Brien.

Now can someone explain the Italianite 'Valentia' name, please?
Admiral Fitzroy was the "Father of Weather Forecasting", and more than just a foil to Charles Darwin, from whom he became estranged over Darwin's biological theories. Valentia was one of the 15 stations Fitzroy used to communicate data by telegraph. Robert Moore in The Weather Experiment considers telegraphy to be the seminal invention for weather forecasting because it allowed data from widely separated points on the earth's surface to be transmitted, collated and interpreted as a single point.



Incidentally, both Ftizroy and his relative Castlereagh committed suicide in the same manner, while the balance of their minds was disturbed.
 

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
48,829

che schifo

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2014
Messages
5,639

Volatire

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
13,663
I know why it's there (because it was where the transAtlantic telegraph came ashore). I know that the Knight of Kerry (the banking Fitzgeralds, local landlords) provided the original accommodation. I know that TCD were somehow involved in equipping it. I know that Admiral Robert Fitzroy's mother was a Londonderry Stewart (and half-sister of the execrable Castlereagh), and his wife was an O'Brien.

Now can someone explain the Italianite 'Valentia' name, please?
Robert Fitzroy is a relatively forgotten figure. An historical wrong.

Not in Argentina, however. First time I visited Buenos Aires, I was puzzled to find a Calle Fitzroy next to Calle Darwin and Calle Humboldt in the fashionable Palermo district. Who was this dude Fitzroy whom I had never heard of? And why did the Argentinians rank him alongside Charles Darwin and Alexander Von Humboldt?

Of course, Robert Fitzroy had a lot to do with Argentina and Tierro del Fuego. He was appointed captain of the Beagle on her first voyage after the original captain commit suicide in the Beagle Channel (it can be a tough area to sail through). Fitzroy was still only 26 when he again captained the Beagle on her second voyage. This time of course, a not very much younger Charles Darwin was on board.

Who knows what influence Fitzroy had on the younger Darwin during the voyage? Possibly a lot, as he was familiar with Lyell and gave Darwin a copy. Darwin tended to minimise the contributions of other people to his ideas.

Fitzroy has a brilliant scientific and practical mind derived from a life at sea. The Beagle kept meticulous records under his captaincy.

After the Beagle voyage, Fitzroy later found religion and opposed Darwinism, even while inventing weather forecasting as we know it. The scientific establishment never forgave him, and the British pretty much wrote him out of history.

As the founder of Irish weather observatories, we should follow the Argentinian example and re-name a street in our capital city after this great man.
 
Last edited:

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
4,403
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
Was it not Spanish?
Good point. My usage there involves short-circuited synapses.

I'm reckoning on Valencia (tra-la-la-la-la) being a large city in Spain, and as Valentia a second-century BC Roman colony. Nearer home, Valentia may have been the pathetic attempt by the Romans to incorporate the Scottish borders into the Empire, and is listed as an early episcopal see.

Valens
was not just the name of the fourth-century Emperor, but also an all-purpose adjective (strong, powerful, healthy), from which comes the female name Valentia.

I'm not sure that makes much sense, even to me.
 

valamhic

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Messages
19,476
The award to Velentia is well deserved. It was used by me to prove Global warming is a hoax and the Irish Energy blog (now on 143,000) hits, used its data to de-bumk much of the case put forward to connect climate hysteria with man's actions.
 

valamhic

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Messages
19,476
Danny Healy Rae; denies climate change but believes in fairies. A real credit to the good people of south Kerry..
He surprised many by announcing the truth about the 1741 extreme weather event which took as many lives as the great famine of 1845. The difference was they could not blame the British. We all went through the Irish education system while being ignorant of this event. Not Danny Heally Rea. We'd be a long time waiting for Simon Covney to tell us
 

RasherHash

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Messages
25,602
:shock:

In 1993 an undergraduate geology student discovered fossilised tetrapod trackways, footprints preserved in Devonian rocks, on the north coast of the island at Dohilla (51°55′51″N 10°20′38″W). About 385 million years ago, a primitive vertebrate passed near a river margin in the sub-equatorial river basin that is now southwestern Ireland and left prints in the damp sand. The prints were preserved by silt and sand overlying them, and were converted to rock over geological time. The Valentia Island trackways are among the oldest signs of vertebrate life on land.

 
Last edited:

Malcolm Redfellow

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2009
Messages
4,403
Website
redfellow.blogspot.com
Twitter
mredfellow
I think the more perceptive souls might like this, from Chapter 1, Scoop of the Century, in Niall O'Dowd's Lincoln and the Irish:
In the misty early morning of Wednesday, April 26, 1865, three men in a small rowing boat set out from Crookhaven, a tiny fishing village in County Cork, Ireland, to intercept the mail steamer Marseilles.

The Marseilles had rendezvoused off the Cork coast and picked up canisters of US mail from the Teutonia, a Hamburg-bound ship via Southampton that had left New York twelve days earlier. The Teutonia had loomed into view off the Irish coast at 8:00 a.m. It was carrying the latest news from America.

The three men, the lookout who had first sighted the ship from a rocky outcrop called Brow Head, and the men on the mail ship itself, were all paid employees of Paul Julius Reuter, a dynamic newspaperman and German immigrant who was determined to have the news first, whatever it took. His name would become a household one soon enough because of the events of that day.

Like all successful men and women of business, Reuter saw an opportunity and took it. In his case, it was building a private telegraph line from Cork City to Crookhaven, the first point of land close enough for a ship from America to be intercepted. The other news services would wait until the ship pulled into Cobh, then called Queenstown, some twenty-five miles further up the coast. Time was money, and Reuter was in a hurry.

At the time, it took about twelve days by steamship to cross the Atlantic. Telegraph lines west from London stopped at County Cork. In America, no working lines yet crossed the Atlantic though there had been many attempts.

Thus, in April 1865 any news from the United States would first come from the mail boat picking up from the transatlantic steamer in the waters off County Cork, the closest landfall, and would then be quickly routed to London and Europe through the Cork City cable office.

If Abraham Lincoln had died just one year later the news would have reached Europe almost immediately, as the first working transatlantic telegraph cable would make land at Valentia Island off Kerry. In 1866. It could handle eight words per minute.
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top