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Venezuelan presidential election


Sync

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2009
Messages
28,845
It's taking place in just 1 week's time!

Maduro (Chavez's deputy) has impressed by whole heartedly throwing himself into the electoral process instead of arguing that Chavez's term should have transferred to him. He's standing 10 points clear of the opposition and has obviously learned a lot from Hugo, promising a curse on anyone who doesn't vote for him, alleging a conspiracy of multiple countries to kill him and equating his main opponent (Capriles) with the Spanish invaders from centuries ago.

Capriles is pretty much stuffed. Unlike previous years, it's not a 2 horse race and the other candidates (there's 5 of them) are taking up around 15 valuable points that he needs. There's no transfers, it's first past the post so unless there are multiple dropouts this week with those candidates throwing their support behind Capriles, next Sunday looks like a forgone conclusion.

BBC News - Venezuelan candidate Maduro puts curse on rival voters
?They want me dead!? Venezuelan president claims US murder plot ? RT News
Polar opposites: Venezuela votes on its future ? RT News
 

petaljam

Moderator
Joined
Nov 23, 2012
Messages
30,656
Thanks Sync, I don't know enough about the details of the situation to comment, but will be keeping an eye on this thread.
I'm interested that Chavez' VP didn't try to get power transferred over to him - I think most supposedly democratic politicians in the world would have had a go at that trick.
 

Rocky

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Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
8,550
Thanks Sync, I don't know enough about the details of the situation to comment, but will be keeping an eye on this thread.
I'm interested that Chavez' VP didn't try to get power transferred over to him - I think most supposedly democratic politicians in the world would have had a go at that trick.
I think he knew there was no need.
 

Sync

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Joined
Aug 27, 2009
Messages
28,845
Yeah Chavez had just won a comprehensive victory. That combined with the sympathy factor meant Maduro would always have been a hot favourite. But the fact is he still took the risk, the election will (going on history) by and large be fairly held and he deserves credit for that.
 

Kevin Doyle

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Joined
Jan 9, 2007
Messages
11,067
Yeah Chavez had just won a comprehensive victory. That combined with the sympathy factor meant Maduro would always have been a hot favourite. But the fact is he still took the risk, the election will (going on history) by and large be fairly held and he deserves credit for that.
I'll reserve judgement until the think tanks in Washington tell me what to think after they have prepped the media accordingly.......or something
 

Ulster-Lad

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
10,092
Thanks Sync, I don't know enough about the details of the situation to comment, but will be keeping an eye on this thread.
I'm interested that Chavez' VP didn't try to get power transferred over to him - I think most supposedly democratic politicians in the world would have had a go at that trick.
Maybe he would have had a go at that if he and Chavez had been sworn in? They were not. So there was No 'Power'.
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
224,093
Thanks Sync, I don't know enough about the details of the situation to comment, but will be keeping an eye on this thread.
I'm interested that Chavez' VP didn't try to get power transferred over to him - I think most supposedly democratic politicians in the world would have had a go at that trick.
Well, there is (or was) dispute over whether Venezuela is adhering to its constitution with the run up to these elections. The dispute is over which procedure to follow, both procedures do require that presidential elections be held which is what we are currently seeing. The dispute revolves around whether or not Chavez was inaugurated. If he wasn't then Maduro should not have been become acting president, but the head of the national assembly should have been made acting president. If he was inaugurated then Maduro should have been made acting president. The catch is that in the former situation Maduro would still have been vice president and ineligible to run for office as long as he held that office.

The relevant articles of the Venezuelan constitution, insofar as I am aware, seem to be: article 229, 231 and 233.

Either procedure ends in presidential elections though.

http://www.venezuelaemb.or.kr/english/ConstitutionoftheBolivarianingles.pdf
 

Trainwreck

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
26,809
Yeah Chavez had just won a comprehensive victory. That combined with the sympathy factor meant Maduro would always have been a hot favourite. But the fact is he still took the risk, the election will (going on history) by and large be fairly held and he deserves credit for that.
Deserves credit for not riding roughshod over the Constitution?

How did the moral West come to such a sorry pass where we praise such things?
 

Tea Party Patriot

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
11,557
It's taking place in just 1 week's time!

Maduro (Chavez's deputy) has impressed by whole heartedly throwing himself into the electoral process instead of arguing that Chavez's term should have transferred to him. He's standing 10 points clear of the opposition and has obviously learned a lot from Hugo, promising a curse on anyone who doesn't vote for him, alleging a conspiracy of multiple countries to kill him and equating his main opponent (Capriles) with the Spanish invaders from centuries ago.

Capriles is pretty much stuffed. Unlike previous years, it's not a 2 horse race and the other candidates (there's 5 of them) are taking up around 15 valuable points that he needs. There's no transfers, it's first past the post so unless there are multiple dropouts this week with those candidates throwing their support behind Capriles, next Sunday looks like a forgone conclusion.

BBC News - Venezuelan candidate Maduro puts curse on rival voters
?They want me dead!? Venezuelan president claims US murder plot ? RT News
Polar opposites: Venezuela votes on its future ? RT News
What matter, given the level of control of media by the government, and the fact the country was a virtual dictatorship under Chavez you can't really place too much faith in any of that data. The Chavez regime will have the election rigged in any case.

I really don't know how you are swallowing the regimes propaganda so easily.
 

Danny10

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Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
761
What matter, given the level of control of media by the government
Vast majority of the media supports the opposition.

and the fact the country was a virtual dictatorship under Chavez
Regular free and fair national elections with higher levels of participation than the USA or Ireland.

you can't really place too much faith in any of that data.
The United Nations and every nation in the world accepts their electoral data to be fair and accurate.

The Chavez regime will have the election rigged in any case.
Baseless errant nonsense.

I really don't know how you are swallowing the regimes propaganda so easily.
I don't know where you get your information from.
 

redsaint

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 18, 2011
Messages
2,374
What matter, given the level of control of media by the government, and the fact the country was a virtual dictatorship under Chavez you can't really place too much faith in any of that data. The Chavez regime will have the election rigged in any case.

I really don't know how you are swallowing the regimes propaganda so easily.
You must get your information from the tabloid media,but then again what do we expect.
 

Rocky

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
8,550
Yeah Chavez had just won a comprehensive victory. That combined with the sympathy factor meant Maduro would always have been a hot favourite. But the fact is he still took the risk, the election will (going on history) by and large be fairly held and he deserves credit for that.
I don't think he deserves credit for not breaking the constitution. Although by taking over when Chavez died he did break the constitution as through the constitution it should have got to the speaker of the parliament.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
11,557
Vast majority of the media supports the opposition.


Regular free and fair national elections with higher levels of participation than the USA or Ireland.


The United Nations and every nation in the world accepts their electoral data to be fair and accurate.


Baseless errant nonsense.


I don't know where you get your information from.
I must say I had quite the chuckle when I see the poster with the hammer and sickle avatar telling us how "free" the media and elections are under the dictatorship of the Chavez regime :lol:
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
224,093
Vast majority of the media supports the opposition.
Could you source that, Danny? I'm partly doubtful, but also interested in the state of the Venezuelan media in 2013. And to be fair though, Danny, even if the vast majority of the media supports the opposition, the media are also obligated to broadcast the president's "cadena" addresses. Something which Maduro has made quite some use of according to some.


Venezuela interim leader vows to tackle crime - Los Angeles Times
https://www.whatsnextvenezuela.com/tag/cadena/
 

Danny10

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Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
761
I must say I had quite the chuckle when I see the poster with the hammer and sickle avatar telling us how "free" the media and elections are under the dictatorship of the Chavez regime :lol:
Of course you chuckle at things you don't understand. Ignorance does that to a person.
Marxism is about the creation of democracy in the social sphere of societal relations, rather than simply having political democracy, as is currently the case. I'm talking about Marxism (not Pol Pot, or anyone else that used the word "marxism" and implemented a policy which had nothing to do with marxism).

If you think the Chavez government is a political dictatorship, then you literally don't understand what the term means.
 

Danny10

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Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
761
Could you source that, Danny? I'm partly doubtful, but also interested in the state of the Venezuelan media in 2013. And to be fair though, Danny, even if the vast majority of the media supports the opposition, the media are also obligated to broadcast the president's "cadena" addresses. Something which Maduro has made quite some use of according to some.


Venezuela interim leader vows to tackle crime - Los Angeles Times
https://www.whatsnextvenezuela.com/tag/cadena/
Sure: Venezuela's press power - Le Monde diplomatique - English edition
Le Monde on the private media's support for the abolition of democracy in 2002, and its hysterical support for the opposition.
It also shows the extent of a stranglehold the private media had on all information in the country at that time. According to the BBC, only 5% of TV stations were publicly owned as of October last year while 70% were private stations, the remainder are "community owned".
BBC News - In depth: Media in Venezuela

Yeah, the media have to give coverage to the President. Perhaps that should be looked at.
But the millions being paid illegally by the US government to the pro-opposition private media and "opposition activist" groups ought to balance things up a little. Documents reveal multimillion-dollar funding to journalists and media in Venezuela | venezuelanalysis.com
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
224,093
Sure: Venezuela's press power - Le Monde diplomatique - English edition
Le Monde on the private media's support for the abolition of democracy in 2002, and its hysterical support for the opposition.
It also shows the extent of a stranglehold the private media had on all information in the country at that time. According to the BBC, only 5% of TV stations were publicly owned as of October last year while 70% were private stations, the remainder are "community owned".
BBC News - In depth: Media in Venezuela

Yeah, the media have to give coverage to the President. Perhaps that should be looked at.
But the millions being paid illegally by the US government to the pro-opposition private media and "opposition activist" groups ought to balance things up a little. Documents reveal multimillion-dollar funding to journalists and media in Venezuela | venezuelanalysis.com
Thank you for this. I didn't quite like the first source, but that might just be me. The BBC article especially was enlightening,and it's sad to see that reporters without borders rank Venezuela so badly when it comes to freedom of the press.
 

Sync

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2009
Messages
28,845
The vote's tomorrow. Maduro has clearly learned from his old master, manipulating his party's grip on the television media to breach electoral rules and spouting conspiritorial craziness about international plots against him.

BBC News - Venezuela opposition says government broke election law

It's gotten closer in the polls this week what with double digit inflation and an inability to provide power and......food making some people think that maybe Chavez wasn't actually all that great. I still bet on him winning by 8.

Nicolas Maduro's Lead In Venezuela Election Poll Narrows Amid Crime, Food Shortages
 

Calig

Active member
Joined
May 20, 2011
Messages
145
Maduro wins Venezuelan presidency

The man former Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez handpicked to be his successor has won the country's presidential vote, officials said late Sunday.

With 99% of votes counted, Nicolas Maduro won 50.6% of votes, National Electoral Council President Tibisay Lucena said, calling the results "irreversible." Opposition candidate Henrique Capriles won 49.07% of votes, she said.
CNN.com
 
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