Warning of Future Catastrophic Flooding in Irish Coastal Cities, including Dublin ....

RasherHash

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"1C average temperature" is actually a lot. It means that places at the extremes will get intensely warmer temperatures, maybe 3 or 4C warmer on average, maybe much more during heat waves.

The global UN target was to keep planetary average to "2C rise over pre-industrial temperature average". The planet has already blown though 1C rise, on average and will blow through at least another 1C, probably 2C, this century.

View attachment 21755
Only if you believe in fairy tales 🙄
 


RasherHash

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This Aussie scientist challenges the climate nutters religion...

 

RasherHash

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If climate change is really to blame for the #bushfireaustralia, then there is really no data to support that.

a.) The fires were set by arson, which is horrific.

b.) Drought was a function of the Indian Ocean Dipole. Rainfall has seen no trend.

c.) 100° days are declining. Chris Martz Weather on Twitter
 

RasherHash

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Sh1t forest management in Aus...

WOW!!! Before and currently in Kangaroo island, Australia, image on right is at the moment, after the #AustraliaFires a devastating image! Source Informações Meteorológicas #Australiabushfire #KangarooIsland WEATHER/ METEO WORLD on Twitter
 

RasherHash

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Many left-wing activists say that #ClimateTax needs to be put on normal hardworking people to avoid massive fires like in #Australia & #Brazil

I just want to remind people that it's a good idea to not let in migrants who protest by setting fires during dry season
#StopMigration BasedPoland on Twitter
 

recedite

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There is a chart in the post above.
Yes, but the charts seem to be for temp anomalies, not avg. temperatures. Admittedly the basic temp data should lead to the same conclusion, but I'd prefer to see exactly how they derived their anomalies.
"Big" and "small" are all relative, 2C seems small but a change of -4C in global average temperature would put the planet back into an Ice Age. An average change of -0.5C put Europe into a Little Ice Age in the 16th to 19th centuries.
The term "Little Ice Age" might be a bit melodramatic, as it was a fairly good time for most European countries, though not for Iceland.
This article suggests it was "as much as" 2C colder.
Places that are already close to the edge of what is habitable will be affected by changes of that magnitude. -2C would affect Iceland badly. +2C would affect the Sahel region badly (probably already is). Large parts of Australia's interior have never really been habitable.
 

RasherHash

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@jmtham651
In what came to be infamously known as the Black Thursday Bushfires, a series of devastating fires consumed a quarter of what is now Victoria – about 5 million hectares – in 1851, the height of which happened on Thursday, 6 February.
 

RasherHash

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Since the Royal Commission into the Black Saturday fires, only a third of the area earmarked for hazard reduction burns has been cleared and former CSIRO bushfire expert Phil Cheney says there have been “excuses… and Pseudo-science to justify this”.

 

RasherHash

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McTell

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Flooding, omg dublin is in for it tonight

Remember venice, that was flooded out 2 months ago? Now the canals are drying up. In January...



Low tides have left canals in Venice almost dry, just two months after severe flooding left much of the Italian city under water.

Boats have been seen almost beached as water levels dip drastically.

The canals look more like mud trenches and getting around has become a problem for many in the city.

In November, Venice experienced its highest water levels in more than 50 years in what some said was a direct result of climate change.
 

Hewson

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RTE's coverage of storm Lorenzo some months back was the butt of jokes for weeks afterwards with text messages doing the rounds showing a plastic garden chair on its back, captioned 'We Will Rebuild!'

The day before the storm hit, RTE's News at One interviewed Met Eireann's Evelyn Cusack. She went on to give a 'maybe it will and maybe it won't' kind of synopsis of where Lorenzo would go and what it might do. She suggested that listeners check Met's website for information.

And she's the head honcho there.

Luckily, George Lee, the agriculture correspondent, followed up with the kind of detailed analysis and advice Cusack seemed either too lazy or too indifferent to provide.

Storm Brendan has proved every bit as farcical for RTE as Lorenzo. On the RTE website today Ciaran Mullooly posted a tweet to show the world just how vicious Brendan was at lunch time in the midlands: I watched a clip of a puddle on the road being lashed by rain and waited for the film to move on to the watery carnage afflicting homeowners or motorists and downed trees or power lines. Even a shot of a car stuck in the flood.

Instead the clip of the puddle continued to the very end, droplets of rain causing actual splashes of water to rise an inch into the air.

Every winter since God was a child we get storms, some heavy, some about as memorable as an elephant breaking wind. Today was a wind-breaking storm.

And, Ciaran, next time leave your garden to get the real action downwind.
 

RasherHash

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RTE's coverage of storm Lorenzo some months back was the butt of jokes for weeks afterwards with text messages doing the rounds showing a plastic garden chair on its back, captioned 'We Will Rebuild!'

The day before the storm hit, RTE's News at One interviewed Met Eireann's Evelyn Cusack. She went on to give a 'maybe it will and maybe it won't' kind of synopsis of where Lorenzo would go and what it might do. She suggested that listeners check Met's website for information.

And she's the head honcho there.

Luckily, George Lee, the agriculture correspondent, followed up with the kind of detailed analysis and advice Cusack seemed either too lazy or too indifferent to provide.

Storm Brendan has proved every bit as farcical for RTE as Lorenzo. On the RTE website today Ciaran Mullooly posted a tweet to show the world just how vicious Brendan was at lunch time in the midlands: I watched a clip of a puddle on the road being lashed by rain and waited for the film to move on to the watery carnage afflicting homeowners or motorists and downed trees or power lines. Even a shot of a car stuck in the flood.

Instead the clip of the puddle continued to the very end, droplets of rain causing actual splashes of water to rise an inch into the air.

Every winter since God was a child we get storms, some heavy, some about as memorable as an elephant breaking wind. Today was a wind-breaking storm.

And, Ciaran, next time leave your garden to get the real action downwind.
The real issue is why are all these people rowing in with this climate nonsense?

The only reasonable answer is they are told by government, their pay master, to ramp up the hysteria.

He who pays the piper, calls the tune.
 

RasherHash

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Hottest day ever in Australia was in January 1909. A temperature of 51.6 Celsius was recorded at Bourke.
 

owedtojoy

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Yes, but the charts seem to be for temp anomalies, not avg. temperatures. Admittedly the basic temp data should lead to the same conclusion, but I'd prefer to see exactly how they derived their anomalies.
Anomalies are differences from the average. You can do the rest by using Google.

The term "Little Ice Age" might be a bit melodramatic, as it was a fairly good time for most European countries, though not for Iceland.
This article suggests it was "as much as" 2C colder.
The article actually says "there are indications that average winter temperatures in Europe and North America were as much as 2°C lower than at present. " That is not inconsistent with what I wrote.

Temperatures reconstructions show summer & winter, globally.

1280px-2000_Year_Temperature_Comparison.png



Places that are already close to the edge of what is habitable will be affected by changes of that magnitude. -2C would affect Iceland badly. +2C would affect the Sahel region badly (probably already is). Large parts of Australia's interior have never really been habitable.
Heat + relative humidity matters. Our normal body temperature is 37C, and if human temperature rises above that due to ambient conditions then our body works harder to cool, through sweat. If humidity inhibits sweating, it can cause heatstroke and death. Thousands of elderly people died of heatstroke in France during the heat wave of 2003.


Temperatures in the upper 20Cs & relative humidity of 60%+ cause prolonged discomfort, and can make outdoor work almost impossible. Some parts of the world, especially close to the tropics, may become places of regular heat waves accompanied by high humidit. Life will be quite hellish - the Red Sea area, South Asia, Australia, Central Africa, Central South America.

And with "business as usual", there is no stopping at 2C global average. Why not 3C? 4C? With the heat waves, the sea level rise and the superstorms, there will be a lot of adapting to be done.
 

owedtojoy

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RTE's coverage of storm Lorenzo some months back was the butt of jokes for weeks afterwards with text messages doing the rounds showing a plastic garden chair on its back, captioned 'We Will Rebuild!'

The day before the storm hit, RTE's News at One interviewed Met Eireann's Evelyn Cusack. She went on to give a 'maybe it will and maybe it won't' kind of synopsis of where Lorenzo would go and what it might do. She suggested that listeners check Met's website for information.

And she's the head honcho there.

Luckily, George Lee, the agriculture correspondent, followed up with the kind of detailed analysis and advice Cusack seemed either too lazy or too indifferent to provide.

Storm Brendan has proved every bit as farcical for RTE as Lorenzo. On the RTE website today Ciaran Mullooly posted a tweet to show the world just how vicious Brendan was at lunch time in the midlands: I watched a clip of a puddle on the road being lashed by rain and waited for the film to move on to the watery carnage afflicting homeowners or motorists and downed trees or power lines. Even a shot of a car stuck in the flood.

Instead the clip of the puddle continued to the very end, droplets of rain causing actual splashes of water to rise an inch into the air.

Every winter since God was a child we get storms, some heavy, some about as memorable as an elephant breaking wind. Today was a wind-breaking storm.

And, Ciaran, next time leave your garden to get the real action downwind.
I drove from Galway to Meath on Monday during Storm Brendan, and we were not comfortable. Ok, it was safe enough, but I am still wondering if we were not taking undue risks.

My own preference is for RTE & Met Eireann to err on the side of caution. If a family had been washed off a coast road into the sea, with no Orange warning, the Twitter trolls will be looking for a head.

Also, what strikes me is that down the years, January was always a month of sharp frosts and cold snaps some lasting a week or more. Who remembers 2010 and the Big Freeze? Yet, this year, there was only a couple of mornings when I had to scrape frost off the car.

Now in January we are into Early Spring Storms. Walking the dog, I can see narcissus (probably daffodils) sprouting from the earth, and the weeds never stopped growing between the bricks in my driveway.
 

RasherHash

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Anomalies are differences from the average. You can do the rest by using Google.



The article actually says "there are indications that average winter temperatures in Europe and North America were as much as 2°C lower than at present. " That is not inconsistent with what I wrote.

Temperatures reconstructions show summer & winter, globally.

View attachment 21943




Heat + relative humidity matters. Our normal body temperature is 37C, and if human temperature rises above that due to ambient conditions then our body works harder to cool, through sweat. If humidity inhibits sweating, it can cause heatstroke and death. Thousands of elderly people died of heatstroke in France during the heat wave of 2003.


Temperatures in the upper 20Cs & relative humidity of 60%+ cause prolonged discomfort, and can make outdoor work almost impossible. Some parts of the world, especially close to the tropics, may become places of regular heat waves accompanied by high humidit. Life will be quite hellish - the Red Sea area, South Asia, Australia, Central Africa, Central South America.

And with "business as usual", there is no stopping at 2C global average. Why not 3C? 4C? With the heat waves, the sea level rise and the superstorms, there will be a lot of adapting to be done.
'Reconstructed' to show warming, a child could reconstruct a graph to show whatever bias they prefer.

It's nonsense.
 


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