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what about the UK Nationals who live full-time in the Republic ?


Spirit Of Newgrange

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During the 700 year occupation of this Island, UK nationals were the masters. Then they were often regarded as our superiors in all senses : military, legal, property, cultural, education, linguistic etc. Then there was independence, then the troubles in the North, then the Good Friday agreement and so on.

Many young british living in ireland were not even alive during so much of Ireland's troubled history. Are they now just another ethnic minority who came here ? just like all the others ? or do they have a special place in our consciousness ?

So, a question : what is the role and status of UK nationals who live in the Republic these days ?

Please keep the discussion polite and respectful at all times
Category:Ethnic groups in Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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it is interesting that the Irish go there, and the British come here ? Is this a totally symbiotic relationship ? Not for footballers certainly, but maybe for other professions.
 

ruserious

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Well Irish citizen's are not regarded as foreigners in the UK. I presume the same is here.
 

GDPR

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I don't think the Brit nationals living in the 26 counties will have much sympathy for the Unionists in the north. Unlike the Unionists, the Brits have moved on (all of them)

Are there any stats on this?
 

cabledude

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I work with English, Welsh, Polish and American.

I refer to all of the above except the English and Welsh as foreigners. Culturally speaking the English/Welsh are almost identical to us. We live beside each other. We rely on each others economies - they are our biggest trading partner. We follow their soccer teams. We follow their rugby teams. They love our golfers. Most of the people I know never approved of 'The Troubles' and in fact completely disagreed with the killing of innocent by-standers. I would look on the English as our friends, our colleagues, our brothers. Fair enough we've had a chequered history but, its history. Leave the history to the historians. Most people are too busy with getting on with their lives to worry about what happened last century.
 
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GDPR

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I work with English, Welsh, Polish and American.

I refer to all of the above except the English and Welsh as foreigners. Culturally speaking the English/Welsh as being almost identical to us. We live beside each other. We rely on each others economies - they are our biggest trading partner. We follow their soccer teams. We follow their rugby teams. They love our golfers. Most of the people I know never approved of 'The Troubles' and in fact completely disagreed with the killing of innocent by-standers. I would look on the English as our friends our colleagues our brothers. Fair enough we've has a chequered history but, its history. Leave the history to the historians. Most people are too busy with getting on with their lives to worry about what happened last century.
Except the Unionists who at least annually march to commemorate battles fought 100s of years ago.
 

caulfield

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Well Irish citizen's are not regarded as foreigners in the UK. I presume the same is here.
Despite all the history the links between the two countries must be the strongest in Europe.
 

cabledude

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Except the Unionists who at least annually march to commemorate battles fought 100s of years ago.
Let em off I say. As I already said, History should be left to the historians.
 

caulfield

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Except the Unionists who at least annually march to commemorate battles fought 100s of years ago.
What has the thread got to do with unionists?
If you want to wind unionists up then head for the NI forum. It's worse on a Saturday than usual!
 

The Owl

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I don't think the OP travels much. I lived in England and Wales for years. Also Singapore, Germany, Saudi Arabia etc. In every country I met loads of Irish. I remember once come to think of it, we were travelling across the desert From Taif to Jeddah and we pulled up behind a parked juggernaut from Ireland. Fella was from Cork, granted, but never mind, still had a great laugh with him.

The point is, who cares anymore about all this shíte. The world is very small now. Get used to it. It's changed forever.
 

flavirostris

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I was down in West Cork recently and I met almost as many people with English accents as Irish. That part of Munster seems to really popular with UK ex-pats
 

Shqiptar

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I think many/most Irish people don't regard them as real "foreigners". Part of it is because there's an assumption that they probably have some Irish connections and part of it is because - as others have said - we have a lot in common.

(Doesn't stop the occasional blazing row on the internet, heh heh.)
 

oggy

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What I like about UK nationals living in Ireland is that they remind me of the fact that right now there are more republicans living in UK than all the republicans in total who ever lived in Ireland
 

Thac0man

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So, a question : what is the role and status of UK nationals who live in the Republic these days ?
My instinctive response is; who cares? I mean there is nothing special about the 'role' of Irish immigrants in Britain. But in truth there is an inclination by some sectors of Irish society to tie us more closely to UK institutions. These though seem to be focused in the Union movement, where perhaps there is a belief that greater co-operation with UK unions will open career doors.
 
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...
So, a question : what is the role and status of UK nationals who live in the Republic these days ? ...
They don't have a role. Nobody has a "role".

They don't have a status. Nobody has a "status".

This response from Oriel House is concise and perfect:

Having a nice cup of minding their own business in my experience.
 
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