What do you think about boarding schools?



petaljam

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Strange that. I got that French alphabet quite easily. Must be my lack of education...
We may not be talking about the same level of mastery. Did you often find yourself having to note down unknown names, addresses, post codes and phone numbers dictated at a rate suitable for native speakers? If you did, and you never found yourself mixing up G and J, or E and I, or writing 80-17 instead of 97 in the middle of a long phone number, well my congratulations, you clearly are a better person than I am. :)
 

Rural

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I didn't say I was 23- I said I was in my mid-20s. I turned 26 this November past. And as for the trophy wife comment if someone wanted a trophy wife surely they would get one less aggressive and opinionated? The fact that you find it strange that people would have older friends really does say something about the damage that Liberalism has done. I see my stalker has thanked your post; when are the mods going to do something about her following me around obsessively?
Have you children?
 

Windowshopper

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I am not a fan of private education to begin with so my prejudices are in the negative.

If I were a parent I'd imagine I'd find it difficult. Regarding the OP I don't think stoicism is all that's it cracked up to be. I have come to find that pushing emotions down can make some less resilient rather than more.

I have friends who were either day-or-full board in boarding schools and I got the impression that bullying can be a problem. A health warning is that this is of course anecdotal. Bullying is a problem in all schools but there is no home escape and expelling students represents an big opportunity cost in terms of fees and donations.

In the UK it of course underlines the class system (though ironically the inflation of fees from foreign millionaires who want their offspring to be Tory gentlemen might push this down as less English people can avail of boarding schools). Boarding schools and the class system is well known in Britain but it is only recently have I come to realize how boarding alumni are disproportionately represented in our elite.
 

GDPR

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We may not be talking about the same level of mastery. Did you often find yourself having to note down unknown names, addresses, post codes and phone numbers dictated at a rate suitable for native speakers? If you did, and you never found yourself mixing up G and J, or E and I, or writing 80-17 instead of 97 in the middle of a long phone number, well my congratulations, you clearly are a better person than I am. :)
I speak French to a reasonable standard and Spanish fluently.

I will tell you now I get brain-freeze over French numbers. Soixante-dix-sept, FFS. Setenta y tres in Spanish!
 

Roberto Jordan

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At primary level I think it's a really bad idea.

Unfortunately if you don't want your children to have to learn Irish you have little choice but to sent them to boarding school unless you live near the border.

Thankfully I lived near the said type of school down here that you can opt out of Irish and I have sent my kids as well as day pupils. They studied Latin instead.
I realize you are probably a troll....but in what planet is not wanting to learn a possible reason for school Choice e let alone sending kids away to board?
 

former wesleyan

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My eldest son said that the best school days he ever had were when they'd all come in from their rugby, shower and then laze around joking and drawing lots to see who would sneak off to buy food. Having a broad range of personalities around for more than just the normal school day is a big plus in my opinion, and nearly ten years later they still meet up for pints and banter. However I admit chance plays a big part in the constitution of the group your child will be part of - or not.
 

Windowshopper

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No unfortunately. It's just from my own experience. On average my friends who have been boarders are more successful in the financial sense than those who weren't boarders.

It is true though that there is the potential for the child to become traumatised by boarding though. I've heard some pretty horrible stories about these places.
Is that a case of the horse before the cart. One's parents would have to fairly wealthy to begin with and such children would exist in a social environment where a job in high paid professions would be seen as normal and achievable.
 
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In France there are state schools which are boarding. In rural areas particularly.
 

cricket

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An anachronism from a previous era, involving the farming out of responsibilities by parents.
 

PBP voter

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I realize you are probably a troll....but in what planet is not wanting to learn a possible reason for school Choice e let alone sending kids away to board?
I dont want my children to have to learn Irish. Nor many other subjects.

What is wrong with that?
 

PBP voter

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My eldest son said that the best school days he ever had were when they'd all come in from their rugby, shower and then laze around joking and drawing lots to see who would sneak off to buy food. Having a broad range of personalities around for more than just the normal school day is a big plus in my opinion, and nearly ten years later they still meet up for pints and banter. However I admit chance plays a big part in the constitution of the group your child will be part of - or not.
Does your username refer to Wesley College or the Wesley Church?
 

gerhard dengler

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Outside of my father the most neurotic people I have had the misfortune to come across have all went to boarding school however correlation is not necessarily causation. Outside of the fact of missing a lot of your child's growing up to me they seem to involve a lot of trust been given to people you don't know. However some people argue that help in Implanting discipline and stoicism into kids. Does anyone here have any positive or negative experiences with them?
I attended a rugby playing secondary school so we had regular trips to play matches against boarding schools such as Clongowes Wood College and Rockwell College and the Cistercian College in Roscrea.
They were very interesting places to visit, I found.

The concept of boarding school is not something which I'm in favour of, saying that.
 

Roberto Jordan

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I dont want my children to have to learn Irish. Nor many other subjects.

What is wrong with that?
Why would learning anything be an issue? Why Irish in particular ? And why would the issue merit making fundamental educational and life choices ?
 

GDPR

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I attended a rugby playing secondary school so we had regular trips to play matches against boarding schools such as Clongowes Wood College and Rockwell College and the Cistercian College in Roscrea.
They were very interesting places to visit, I found.

The concept of boarding school is not something which I'm in favour of, saying that.
I could never send a child of mine to either the Jesuits or the Ursulines.
 


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