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What does NO vote in deprived areas say to you?


Disillusioned democrat

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Mar 16, 2010
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I had naively assumed that the referendum was a slam dunk - who's NOT for better child protection, eh?

It seems the good people of Jobstown are, and many other similarly deprived areas. The question is why?

My cynical intuitive assumption was that it proves the theory that kids are big sources of incomes and allowances in these areas and that one unheralded feature of a YES vote is more state power to remove kids from unsuitable parents - this depriving them of benefits and allowances, but maybe I'm being unfair.

Does any have any thoughts on why many deprived areas are voting NO?
 


thebig C

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I think there could be an element of what you say in the minds of some of those voters. However, I think its more likely that it is purely an anti-government vote.

Added to which, from what I hear, some opposition parties who were publically in favour of the Referendum were privately against it.

C
 

hmmm

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Oct 4, 2006
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Because people living in so called "deprived" areas have become used to having their lifestyle and locality funded by the taxpayer, and are angry at recent cutbacks and the horror of being asked to work for a living. It's purely an anti-society vote.
 

floatingvoter2011

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Feb 8, 2011
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I had naively assumed that the referendum was a slam dunk - who's NOT for better child protection, eh?

It seems the good people of Jobstown are, and many other similarly deprived areas. The question is why?

My cynical intuitive assumption was that it proves the theory that kids are big sources of incomes and allowances in these areas and that one unheralded feature of a YES vote is more state power to remove kids from unsuitable parents - this depriving them of benefits and allowances, but maybe I'm being unfair.

Does any have any thoughts on why many deprived areas are voting NO?
Because they are more likely to have to deal with state child services, social workers etc and know just how incompetent they are.
 

ruserious

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I can't imagine the types who go around all day in their bedclothes to educate themselves on what the referendum is about.
Simple minds think that the government will take away children from them. Children being their source of income from state benefits.
Oh, this referendum has pushed me to the right. I feel it in my bones.
 

Marcos the black

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Some areas (and posters) just vote no to everything, regardless of the issue...
 

Tough Paddy

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We saw exactly the same phenomenon during the fiscal treaty referendum where disadvantaged areas overwhelmingly voted 'No'.
 

dustin

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These areas will suffer most but no one will be exempt of the possibility of losing there children
 
Last edited:

Upper Chamber

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The politics.ie poll showed a majority voting no. Does that mean that most p.ie subscribers are working class?
 

thebig C

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We saw exactly the same phenomenon during the fiscal treaty referendum where disadvantaged areas overwhelmingly voted 'No'.
My problem with that waS that it facilitated the myth that "the areas that voted No are suffering most". Well, Social Welfare, Rent Supplement, Childrens allowence etc etc....have either not been cut of only cut by a miniscule ammount. In contrast, those who voted Yes have had were from areas paying the highest income tax rates, household charge, Income Levy etc!.....So those paying the highest price voted Yes.
 

Analyzer

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It indicates that the primary influencing factor concerning the credibility of authority in this country is income level. This means closeness and distance from the money in this country.

And after that, there might be a secondary factor, of distance from Kildare Street/the political parties/the media. This means closeness from the power in this country.

This is surprising considering that authority has displayed serious accountability problems in this country, on a repeated basis.

In other words, we might have many people who are either sceptical or gullible for the same reason.
 

Analyzer

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'orebel

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Because people living in so called "deprived" areas have become used to having their lifestyle and locality funded by the taxpayer, and are angry at recent cutbacks and the horror of being asked to work for a living. It's purely an anti-society vote.
You seem like a very nice person.
 

Plebian

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Feb 20, 2011
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9,339
I had naively assumed that the referendum was a slam dunk - who's NOT for better child protection, eh?

It seems the good people of Jobstown are, and many other similarly deprived areas. The question is why?

My cynical intuitive assumption was that it proves the theory that kids are big sources of incomes and allowances in these areas and that one unheralded feature of a YES vote is more state power to remove kids from unsuitable parents - this depriving them of benefits and allowances, but maybe I'm being unfair.

Does any have any thoughts on why many deprived areas are voting NO?
Jesus H C, a source of income? €28 a week per child on welfare and another rapidly declining €30 or so a week in child benefit that is not dependent on being on welfare. Do you really think that a person with €188.50 to last the week on their own would deliberately make the decision to take care of two people for another €28 to €58 a week.

The people in this area are far more likely to come into contact with the state and are much more likely to be one of the hard cases if there are flaws in the implementation of this.
 

Twin Towers

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Oct 14, 2005
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5,882
I can't imagine the types who go around all day in their bedclothes to educate themselves on what the referendum is about.
Simple minds think that the government will take away children from them. Children being their source of income from state benefits.
Oh, this referendum has pushed me to the right. I feel it in my bones.
The "bedclothes" people don't vote anyway.

There is a strong thinking anti establishment vote in working class areas that is represented by nobody and they certainly do go out and vote No to show their frustration.

The remarkable thing is that no party has emerged to fill this vacuum.
 

Clanrickard

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Apr 25, 2008
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32,952
Does any have any thoughts on why many deprived areas are voting NO?
Because they have their own opinions that are the not the same as yours and you arrogantly assume you are right and they are wrong.
 

ruserious

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Jan 3, 2011
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29,619
The "bedclothes" people don't vote anyway.

There is a strong thinking anti establishment vote in working class areas that is represented by nobody and they certainly do go out and vote No to show their frustration.

The remarkable thing is that no party has emerged to fill this vacuum.
The nighty wearing looney party?
 

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