What does the DUP actually want? What is their ideal situation?

Emily Davison

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Messages
30,469
Fair play to Jim , he speaks his mind and does not care what anyone else thinks. At least he is honest which is more than can be said for a lot of politicians.

Makes a good point about the decline of Blind Date when it got all woke and PC.
I fail to see what you are admiring in that clip. The man's an idiot, and he willingly went on a show where the sole aim was to show the British what a clown he is.

And admiring hate fuelled views does you no credit. The man is a homophobe along with being stupid. Blind date was of a certain era. Now we have love island and all sorts. Gay characters on shows are now mainstream in case you've failed to notice. So your belief that it's the woke generation got to Blind Date is way off the mark. How do you explain the top talk show in Britian headed by an Irish gay man !
 


Emily Davison

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Messages
30,469
To be fair Wells seems to be one of the last DUPers to be that outspoken. They all still vote against gay rights but are a bit more circumspect about speaking their mind so freely because they know they'd be ridiculed for it. Back 30/40 years ago Ian Paisley Senior and other Free Ps campaigned furiously to prevent the decriminalisation of homosexuality with the slogan "Save Ulster From Sodomy".
Ironically, because of Paisley's fierce opposition to civil rights for another minority Ulster ended up getting buggered anyway. :)
I'm well aware of that from Paisley, we had plenty enough of that in the South. But that was then, you wouldn't get away with that now. Though Bishop Doran does his best gawd bless him from time to time. And the Iona crowd with their spectacular own goal with Pantibliss.
 

Rural

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2007
Messages
27,545
Who said it should be nine counties? Ulster as a distinct entity goes back thousands of years and it's size has varied immensley. I think it was The English who defined it as the nine counties you speak off in the seventeenth century - so you pay your money and take your choice.

Is it poor schooling that leads to constant repetition of nonsense by so many on this forum? I live in England and seem to know more Irish history than some on this forum.
Ulster was a Province of Ireland long before the English invaded and settled it.

The origins of these provinces (loosely federated kingdoms with somewhat flexible boundaries), of which there were five before the Norman invasion, can be traced to the over-riding influence exerted in their respective territories by the great Irish dynastic families of Uí Néill/O'Neill (Ulster), Uí Máeilsheáchlainn/O'Melaghlin (Mide), Uí Briain/O'Brien (Munster), Uí Conchobhair/O'Conor (Connacht) and Mac Murchadha-Caomhánach/MacMurrough-Kavanagh (Leinster). A "king of over-kings", a rí ruirech was often a provincial (rí cóicid) or semi-provincial king to whom several ruiri were subordinate.

My schooling was fine and I can spell immensely, which seems to be lacking in your education.
 

milipod

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
7,670
Ulster was a Province of Ireland long before the English invaded and settled it.

The origins of these provinces (loosely federated kingdoms with somewhat flexible boundaries), of which there were five before the Norman invasion, can be traced to the over-riding influence exerted in their respective territories by the great Irish dynastic families of Uí Néill/O'Neill (Ulster), Uí Máeilsheáchlainn/O'Melaghlin (Mide), Uí Briain/O'Brien (Munster), Uí Conchobhair/O'Conor (Connacht) and Mac Murchadha-Caomhánach/MacMurrough-Kavanagh (Leinster). A "king of over-kings", a rí ruirech was often a provincial (rí cóicid) or semi-provincial king to whom several ruiri were subordinate.

My schooling was fine and I can spell immensely, which seems to be lacking in your education.
He is here on a fishing trip avoid the bait.
 

Mickeymac

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2010
Messages
39,098
Ulster was a Province of Ireland long before the English invaded and settled it.

The origins of these provinces (loosely federated kingdoms with somewhat flexible boundaries), of which there were five before the Norman invasion, can be traced to the over-riding influence exerted in their respective territories by the great Irish dynastic families of Uí Néill/O'Neill (Ulster), Uí Máeilsheáchlainn/O'Melaghlin (Mide), Uí Briain/O'Brien (Munster), Uí Conchobhair/O'Conor (Connacht) and Mac Murchadha-Caomhánach/MacMurrough-Kavanagh (Leinster). A "king of over-kings", a rí ruirech was often a provincial (rí cóicid) or semi-provincial king to whom several ruiri were subordinate.

My schooling was fine and I can spell immensely, which seems to be lacking in your education.

Unionist politicians openly have admitted on Ulster Radio they were unhappy with education standards in their schools.

Critics on the other hand have called it underachievement and said teachers were not to blame, common sense tells me, how can painting kerbstones, building bonfires and spraying profanities on walls enhance a young persons education?
 

EnglishObserver

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
2,765
Ulster was a Province of Ireland long before the English invaded and settled it.

The origins of these provinces (loosely federated kingdoms with somewhat flexible boundaries), of which there were five before the Norman invasion, can be traced to the over-riding influence exerted in their respective territories by the great Irish dynastic families of Uí Néill/O'Neill (Ulster), Uí Máeilsheáchlainn/O'Melaghlin (Mide), Uí Briain/O'Brien (Munster), Uí Conchobhair/O'Conor (Connacht) and Mac Murchadha-Caomhánach/MacMurrough-Kavanagh (Leinster). A "king of over-kings", a rí ruirech was often a provincial (rí cóicid) or semi-provincial king to whom several ruiri were subordinate.

My schooling was fine and I can spell immensely, which seems to be lacking in your education.
Ouch

Must boot up the old spell checker...
 

EnglishObserver

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
2,765
Unionist politicians openly have admitted on Ulster Radio they were unhappy with education standards in their schools.

Critics on the other hand have called it underachievement and said teachers were not to blame, common sense tells me, how can painting kerbstones, building bonfires and spraying profanities on walls enhance a young persons education?
Why have The English always called the Irish THICK Paddies?
 

Mickeymac

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2010
Messages
39,098
Why have The English always called the Irish THICK Paddies?

Disgraceful the way they referred to Blair Mayne like that. 😂

Did he not play a part in the founding of the infamous SAS, responsible for many murders of innocent people in the sick counties?
 

Rural

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 28, 2007
Messages
27,545
Why have The English always called the Irish THICK Paddies?
There's a blatant lie and a gross exaggeration.

The English do not refer to us as "Thick Paddies", a very small, ignorant group of English may do so (the same group have derogatory names for people of many races), just to make themselves feel a bit superior (there are ignoramuses like that worldwide). Some newspaper reporters do it to sell certain types of newspapers.

I know many English people and there is always a mutual respect and we share the same sense of humour.
 

Mickeymac

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2010
Messages
39,098
There's a blatant lie and a gross exaggeration.

The English do not refer to us as "Thick Paddies", a very small, ignorant group of English may do so (the same group have derogatory names for people of many races), just to make themselves feel a bit superior (there are ignoramuses like that worldwide). Some newspaper reporters do it to sell certain types of newspapers.

I know many English people and there is always a mutual respect and we share the same sense of humour.


I know quite a lot of English folk, thankfully I never got to even speak to the bottom of the barrel type that frequents here, OK some of them are wannabe English but nevertheless they are no credit to the real English folk, who generally are all fair and decent people.
 

death or glory

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 1, 2012
Messages
19,154
I fail to see what you are admiring in that clip. The man's an idiot, and he willingly went on a show where the sole aim was to show the British what a clown he is.

And admiring hate fuelled views does you no credit. The man is a homophobe along with being stupid. Blind date was of a certain era. Now we have love island and all sorts. Gay characters on shows are now mainstream in case you've failed to notice. So your belief that it's the woke generation got to Blind Date is way off the mark. How do you explain the top talk show in Britian headed by an Irish gay man !
Again your naivety or ignorance is on show calling Jim stupid.
One thing he certainly is not is stupid.
He is a barrister by trade and from all the flaws on Stormont highlighted by the RHI scandal, Jim was highlighting a lot of the failures long before.
You may not like him and disagree with his views on homosexuality, but that does not make him stupid.
Whereas thinking Sion Mills is Stranmillis college and not knowing who a well known political commentator and newspaper editor is?
 

Talk Back

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 14, 2017
Messages
6,462
Why have The English always called the Irish THICK Paddies?
You can blame Henry Il, King of England for that - or to be precise, his propaganda minister Giraldus Cambrensis.

The historical facts do not fit in with you anglophiles and your "Giraldus Cambrensis" racist book of lies, view of Ireland.

The actual facts are that when the Roman Empire fell, we Irish saved the western world by opening centres of learning throughout Europe - meanwhile, your people in Britain were walking around on their knuckles.
 


New Threads

Most Replies

Top