What Is The Most Significant Event Ever In Irish History?

ruserious

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Vogue Williams' new fashion line.
 


former wesleyan

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The Great Hunger .
Wasn’t there plenty of food being exported when the People of the country were dying from lack of food
.
Not really. Cattle and sheep mainly, but they're no good in a famine situation as their replacement period is far too long.
 

stakerwallace

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Roy Keane's hissy fit
 

Supra

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Not really. Cattle and sheep mainly, but they're no good in a famine situation as their replacement period is far too long.
Grain, fruit and fish also. Perfectly good in a famine situation.
Fish was not being exported it just wasn't accessible.
 

General Urko

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What is the point of listing off a series of historical events or asking people to select what they think is the most significant event in Irish history?

All the events you list are significant and each one could have a thread of its own.

The other problem with an OP like that is it invites ridicule.

Asking questions as to what is the most significant is like asking which wave that falls on a beach is the most significant.
No it's not!
Yes there are all hugely significant and mostly preety shyte for any people to have had to put up with, but it is not an 'I had to live in a shoebox' misery thread!
It's asking for an evaluation of what shaped us the most!
 

Drogheda445

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The arrival of the Normans in 1169 seems obvious but IMO given how important religion and identity has been in modern Irish history I would actually suggest the English Reformation.

While not technically part of Irish history, it might as well have been given the far reaching effects it would have. By adding the religious dimension to English/British rule; it led to religious persecution, Cromwell's campaign, the Ascendancy and the impoverishment that came with it (and eventually conditions that led to the Famine), the Penal Laws, and of course through the Plantations to the Partition of Ireland and the Troubles. It ensured that British rule in Ireland would become particularly brutal at various points and poisoned relations across Ireland with sectarian strife, making attempts at independence far more bitter and bloodied.
 

Bea C

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Mary McAuliffe was on Radio Kerry this morning about the insight that Victoria drama thing is having on the British interpretation of the Famine.
 

Supra

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Mary McAuliffe was on Radio Kerry this morning about the insight that Victoria drama thing is having on the British interpretation of the Famine.
I'd hazard a guess that the irish are talking about the that more than the British.
 

yosef shompeter

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My two cents:
I find the topic for discussion quite good... I think the people of this country don't get a good broad view of history in secondary school -- if my experience is anything to go by.

Some british writer ---awful eejit -- -wrote some learned tome about the "Great Men Who Made History. Clive of India and Marlborough and Wellington etc.
but the really big changes are in scientific discovery and their application... call that innovation in modern parlance. So you have the internal combustion engine -- I think Otto was the name of the inventor... and then Henry Ford, who mass-produced it.
Likewise electric light... Faraday? excuse my ignorance... and the people saw through with the electrification.... built Ardnacrusha power station.
So I suppose I have to throw in Sir Francis Drake whose innovation was the introduction of the humble spud. Before that people used to grow wheat. That explains all the millstones that turn up in archaeological digs...
 

sgtharper

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Mary McAuliffe was on Radio Kerry this morning about the insight that Victoria drama thing is having on the British interpretation of the Famine.
What? One article in the Irish section of The Times and a few comments below it? She's kidding herself.
 

Degeneration X

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My two cents:
I find the topic for discussion quite good... I think the people of this country don't get a good broad view of history in secondary school -- if my experience is anything to go by.

Some british writer ---awful eejit -- -wrote some learned tome about the "Great Men Who Made History. Clive of India and Marlborough and Wellington etc.
but the really big changes are in scientific discovery and their application... call that innovation in modern parlance. So you have the internal combustion engine -- I think Otto was the name of the inventor... and then Henry Ford, who mass-produced it.
Likewise electric light... Faraday? excuse my ignorance... and the people saw through with the electrification.... built Ardnacrusha power station.
So I suppose I have to throw in Sir Francis Drake whose innovation was the introduction of the humble spud. Before that people used to grow wheat. That explains all the millstones that turn up in archaeological digs...
Good points but shouldn't the indigenous people of the Andes in South America get credit for that one?
 

che schifo

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LISTOWEL MAN

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Twenty years ago today, Sinead O'Connor tore up a picture of the pope on Saturday Night Live
 

Clanrickard

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What? One article in the Irish section of The Times and a few comments below it? She's kidding herself.
Was a bit more than that to be fair. A lot on twitter.
 

RodShaft

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My two cents:
I find the topic for discussion quite good... I think the people of this country don't get a good broad view of history in secondary school -- if my experience is anything to go by.

Some british writer ---awful eejit -- -wrote some learned tome about the "Great Men Who Made History. Clive of India and Marlborough and Wellington etc.
but the really big changes are in scientific discovery and their application... call that innovation in modern parlance. So you have the internal combustion engine -- I think Otto was the name of the inventor... and then Henry Ford, who mass-produced it.
Likewise electric light... Faraday? excuse my ignorance... and the people saw through with the electrification.... built Ardnacrusha power station.
So I suppose I have to throw in Sir Francis Drake whose innovation was the introduction of the humble spud. Before that people used to grow wheat. That explains all the millstones that turn up in archaeological digs...
And when it comes to Irish history.

The real drivers were politics not wars.

The Synod of Cashel, not the battle of Clontarf. The Penal Laws not the battle of Kinsale. The Act of Union not the 1798 rebellion.
 

The Field Marshal

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No it's not!
Yes there are all hugely significant and mostly preety shyte for any people to have had to put up with, but it is not an 'I had to live in a shoebox' misery thread!
It's asking for an evaluation of what shaped us the most!
That's exactly the same as asking which wave that hit the beach was the most significant one.
That is what you are doing with these OPs.

You,ll get a pile of replies with each deluded poster concentrating on what they think is important.
 

Degeneration X

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And when it comes to Irish history.

The real drivers were politics not wars.

The Synod of Cashel, not the battle of Clontarf. The Penal Laws not the battle of Kinsale. The Act of Union not the 1798 rebellion.
War is the pursuit of politics by other means!!
 

RodShaft

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War is the pursuit of politics by other means!!
Possibly.

But I suspect even von Clausewitz would concede that most wars are trifling affairs given the sweep of political history.
 


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