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What is the policy of the Gaelscoileanna on admission of pupils?


Toland

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I've been having a conversation with an old friend of mine this evening. She's been through the secondary school system through Irish and is working parttime (and often voluntarily) in helping adult students to learn Irish.

Her credentials, in short, are irrewhatdoyamacallitable.

She has been relating that some people of her acquaintance (not me) have been trying to get their children into school with a number of different gaelscoilleanna in the Dubbelin area.

She tells me the response is that there are two criteria for entering Gaelscoileanna where there is a shortage of places:

1) If the child already has a sibling in the school.
2) If the child is in a family where Irish is spoken at home.

Now criterion (1) seems fine. I'm a little unsure about criterion (2) (if indeed it applies).

I have a total of three questions on this subject:

A) Are these indeed the criteria used by the gaelscoileanna for admittance into a one of their schools when there is a shortage?
and, if so:

B) Is Criterion 2 compatible with their purpose of promoting use of the Irish language in all sections of Irish society?
C) Is Criterion 2 compatible with the applicable law on discrimination against particular ethnic groups?

The answer to (A) may be no, in which case this thread is likely to have a very short life expectancy, and if it is yes, the (B) might have some very defensible answers.

What are posters' thoughts on Question (C)?
 

'orebel

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Criterion 1 is accurate (or at least applies in the Gaelscoil my kids attend).
Criterion 2 is catchment area.
That is all.
 

Toland

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Criterion 1 is accurate (or at least applies in the Gaelscoil my kids attend).
Criterion 2 is catchment area.
That is all.
Thank you for the information.

So criterion 2, as I have characterised it, is incorrect?

To be honest, I was hoping that was the case.

I'm not at all hostile to the gaelscoil movement. On the contrary.
 

ger12

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Why would you object to children being raised with Irish at home having an increased chance of accessing a Gaelscoil?
 

'orebel

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Thank you for the information.

So criterion 2, as I have characterised it, is incorrect?


To be honest, I was hoping that was the case.

I'm not at all hostile to the gaelscoil movement. On the contrary.
I know for a fact that it doesn't exist at our local school. I can't speak for others but it would seem to be a strange requirement.
 
D

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Why would you object to children being raised with Irish at home having an increased chance of accessing a Gaelscoil?
Because all children should have equal opportunity of access to all State-funded schools. Otherwise the elitism of which these schools are sometimes accused might become a reality.
 

Boy M5

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I think the criteria is wider depending on the school. I know of kids from non Gaelgoir homes in a gaelscoil also another school I know has intake with a large non Irish citizen intake.
 

Telemachus

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To a liberal lad like Toland, non-discrimination is the highest concern. The highest principle that society should be organised around.

So here hes attacking what he sees as non application of that. Pathetic.
 

Black George

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Wouldn't that be a de facto barrier to the entry of children of immigrants?
Be serious. How many immigrants would want their children to learn Irish. Most of them couldn't care less if they don't even learn to speak English. To claim social welfare all you need is to scribble your name.
 

OCicero

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It really depends on the Gaelscoil. Some have a list as long as your arm. The 2) you cited there does not apply in every school. Where is does, it applies in varying degrees of enforcement: everything from ticking a box to say you speak Irish at home (wink wink) to a full-blooded oral exam of parent(s).
 

Toland

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I think the criteria is wider depending on the school. I know of kids from non Gaelgoir homes in a gaelscoil also another school I know has intake with a large non Irish citizen intake.
That is good news.

There appears to be a perception going round that, at least in schools where there is a shortage of places, an Irish-speaking families first rule applies.

I'm genuinely concerned to know whether this is in fact the case and, if it is, make my small contribution to doing something about it and, if it isn't, to help clear the record.
 
D

Deleted member 17573

To a liberal lad like Toland, non-discrimination is the highest concern. The highest principle that society should be organised around.

So here hes attacking what he sees as non application of that. Pathetic.
He's attacking the non-application of non-discrimination? How very confusing, especially since he doesn't appear to be attacking anything. But it has been observed that sometimes those with a guilty conscience can imagine they are being attacked on the issue of which they are guilty.
 

OCicero

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Wouldn't that be a de facto barrier to the entry of children of immigrants?
There is nothing to stop immigrants learning Irish and speaking it at home.
 

Toland

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It really depends on the Gaelscoil. Some have a list as long as your arm. The 2) you cited there does not apply in every school. Where is does, it applies in varying degrees of enforcement: everything from ticking a box to say you speak Irish at home (wink wink) to a full-blooded oral exam of parent(s).
If it exists at all it is a scandal, and possibly actionable.
 

ger12

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'orebel

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Be serious. How many immigrants would want their children to learn Irish. Most of them couldn't care less if they don't even learn to speak English. To claim social welfare all you need is to scribble your name.
The parents of the 2 Polish kids, the parents of the Ghanaian kid and the parents of the Indian kid in my sons class.
 

damoireland

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Wouldn't that be a de facto barrier to the entry of children of immigrants?
As opposed to de facto discrimination against the other 98% of the population who also dont speak Irish in the home.? Why is your concen only related to discrimination against non irish people?
 

Toland

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Is that a serious question?

I've spent some time in the Basque Country. I can assure you that, even though their facilities for learning Basque are orders of magnitude superior to the facilities in Ireland to help adults learn Irish, it is effectively impossible for any couple of immigrants to speak Basque at home.
 
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