• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please us viua the Contact us link in the footer.

What is the Unionist opinion of John Hume?


Just Jack

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 10, 2010
Messages
3,792
Although I’m not a Stoop, I’ve always had great admiration for John Hume. I was of the impression he was one of the very few (perhaps the only) politician in the six counties who could command respect and admiration from all communities. Indeed, many would credit him as the main architect of the relative peace that is now enjoyed in the north.

Nonetheless, this impression is seemingly not held within certain sections of unionism.

Although I’m not going to quote individuals, I have seen some claiming they have more respect for Adams and McGuinness than they do for Hume. Alas, this view was also echoed by Gregory Campbell, thus it must have some credence within political unionism outwith the realms of p.ie.

But why or how exactly is Hume viewed in this way?

What is the general unionist opinion of Hume?
 


between the bridges

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Messages
45,658
Baron Trimble's sidekick for the Noble peace Prize...
 

Global Justice

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
13,520
Although I’m not going to quote individuals, I have seen some claiming they have more respect for Adams and McGuinness than they do for Hume. Alas, this view was also echoed by Gregory Campbell, thus it must have some credence within political unionism outwith the realms of p.ie.
In a segment of the Derry Journal that goes back to yesteryear around Christmas 2011, it went back to the 1980's with articles and quotes from Gregory Campbell and his abhorrent attitude towards John Hume. He said he respected Gerry Adams more :lol:

It's bitterness. An actual peacemaker and human rights fighter who exposed the vile filth and repression of their corrupt and sectarian statelet



CAIN: the bogside artists - the john hume mural

And it's no surprise that he same folk have an irrational hate towards Nelson Mandela and Mother Teresa too
 

devonish

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
Messages
3,745
Nasty nasty little bigot , what a unhappy mix of total failure you are .
You may not agree with the opinion offerred but it's rather pathetic to just churn out an insult. Are you not interested as to why Cruimh has this view?
 

InsideImDancing

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2011
Messages
21,961
What's a "knights man"?
It's some sort of Catholic organisation. Some Unionists seem to have a serious problem with anything to do with the Catholic church.
 

belfast1981

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 23, 2012
Messages
3,670
The guy did a fantastic job of trying to achieve peace on this island. I give him full credit for his work. Without him, who knows what today would be like.
 

devonish

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
Messages
3,745
It's some sort of Catholic organisation. Some Unionists seem to have a serious problem with anything to do with the Catholic church.
Hey, I have some catholic friends who have a serious problem with the catholic church.
 

InsideImDancing

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2011
Messages
21,961
Hey, I have some catholic friends who have a serious problem with the catholic church.
So do I as it happens, but the religious sectarianism is very rarely a two-way street.
 

Cruimh

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2010
Messages
85,676
What's a "knights man"?
The Order of the Knights of Saint Columbanus - About the Knights of St. Columbanus

What I had learned from a friendly Catholic lawyer was that John Hume had been at a weekend meeting in Donegal design¬ed to form a Catholic political party. I found this very surprising because Hume was heavily involved in the talks the civil rights grouping were having with a view to a broad-based party. What surprised me most was that none of our group were invited to come to the meeting or were even informed of it, which, we heard later, had been attended by middle-class Catholics, mainly from Derry. I could smell that the Knights of Colum-banus were probably involved.
We were angry with Hume, for it was not the first time we had felt he was pursuing his own agenda. In the June election he had supported the nomination of Eddie McAteer, the leader of the Nationalist Party, against the nomination of Claude Wilton for the Derry seat at Westminster. We believed that McAteer had no chance but that Wilton had. He was a popular figure in Derry, completely non-sectarian and generously liberal in outlook, and respected by all sides. He was likely to get the Catholic vote and many Protestant votes, just the sort of cross-community support we were aiming to attract as the political bedrock of our new party.
The more I thought about it the more I saw Hume's action that weekend as not only divisive but probably primarily aimed at stopping us from organising just such a cross-community party. There was likely to have been a bit of self-interest on Hume's part as well. In such a Catholic party he would have been the undisputed leader, whereas Gerry Fitt, as the most experienced and senior politician among us, with a seat at Westminster, was the obvious leader of our intended party. I was of course com¬pletely hostile to the church dabbling in party-making and politics anyway. After all, it was their misguided meddling which had enabled the Provos to get started, and I was highly critical of how elements of the church and priesthood, over the years, had played a conservative, anti-socialist role, supporting the status quo and opposing any attempt at a radical rethink or restructuring of society. Poorly thought-out and irrelevant sermons delivered from Sunday pulpits signally failed to address the issues of equality or morality that mattered to ordinary peo¬ple. There was no reference to the issues of deprivation, the lack of jobs, poor housing, extortionate mortgage rates, excessive rents or the wave of violence, robbery, social security fiddling and corruption that the Provos ultimately unleashed.
pages 140-141


Straight Left An Autobiography by Paddy Devlin
© 1993, The Blackstaff Press

People to respect in the SDLP - Paddy Devlin, Gerry Fitt and Austin Currie.
 

between the bridges

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Messages
45,658
Originally Posted by InsideImDancing
It's some sort of Catholic organisation. Some Unionists seem to have a serious problem with anything to do with the Catholic church.
So do I as it happens, but the religious sectarianism is very rarely a two-way street.
True i can't think of any protestant organisation CNR have a problem with...
 

bona na croin

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2009
Messages
1,779

New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top