What language errors annoy you the most?

GDPR

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Speaking of idiot footballers and their sometimes not so idiot managers, speaking of "Top, top players". Do they ever listen to themselves?
 


Mushroom

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corporal punishment

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What are you inferring. :p
 

Black Swan

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In my experience, the interchangeable use of 'then' and 'than' usually suggests an uneducated and wilfully ignorant American of the conservative persuasion; or some shill on an Eastern European troll farm, attempting to imitate one.
 

soubresauts

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but it's achieved colloquialisms status
Oh, there's another one -- "it's" as an abbreviation of "it has". "It's" should be used only as an abbreviation of "it is".

Similarly, we must eliminate "he's" and "she's" (for "he has" and "she has"). Example: "He's a Monster at home." (He keeps his Ducati Monster at home.)

And you must have noticed the cringeworthy possessive "you're" instead of "your".

Also, a strange mangling of the Conditional Tense which seems to be spreading from America "If he would of told me, I would have been there.."
Yes, I've noticed that awful solecism. I'm afraid it may be creeping into Ireland now, having crossed the Atlantic. As a counter to that, I like to quote the old codger: "If I had known I was going to live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself."

I'm working on eliminating "can't" from the language. "Cannot" is the way to go. With people speaking quickly, "can't" sounds much too close to its opposite "can".
 

Ellen Ripley

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Most of the grammar and pronunciation errors that have been posted I too find mildly annoying; also the ubiquitous:

"Orders now been taken for Christmas Parties, birthdays, etc." as if they're not taking any more.

I'm quite fond of some of the colourful and expresive Hiberno-isms posters have listed.

Children from Mayo on school tours to Dublin always paid a visit to the Ezoo.
 

Wascurito

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People who refer to December 26th as Stephenses Day bewilder me.
 

KEYHOLE KATE

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What about the inability to distinguish between floor and ground? I was speaking to someone in Cumbria U.K. who said there was no "snow on the floor" I wondered if he was living in a roofless house. And it wasn't Groundhog Day!
 

milipod

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[video=youtube;WZ-1DYwaxrE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZ-1DYwaxrE[/video]
 

redhead

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Your/you're, it's elementary grammar. No one educated past primary school should get it wrong.
 

The Sentinel

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We're all aware that language is changing, and that what's a mistake today is the standard language of the future, but are there any changes in the language that you feel take away from its richness or its logic, or that just annoy you for some reason? Here are a few that grate with me, off the top of my head:

The misuse of the term "refute", usually to mean "deny".
The use of "I'm good" to say that you're well. "I'm good" is about what sort of a person you are.
People saying "The thing is, is Johnnie's xyz", rather than "The thing is that Johnnie's xyz". It makes mincemeat of English grammatical structure.
The English habit of saying "I'm sat here" or "I'm stood here" when they mean "I'm sitting here" or "I'm standing here". For me "I'm stood here" suggests that somebody put you there, rather than you being there of your own free will. It loses that nuance with overuse.

One that doesn't personally grate on me for some reason, though it really should, is the use of the singular verb when asking "How's things?" as opposed to "How are things?" Nobody outside of the Goodness Gracious Me comedy show would reply "Things is good", after all, would they?

There are loads of others, but I just can't think of them at the moment.

What do other posters love to hate? And what do they find themselves willing to live with. Are there any changes in modern English that actually enrich the language?

And are there any grammatically "incorrect" forms that are dying out, that you'd like to keep. I'm thinking, for example of the Hiberno-English "I do be ...," which is both beautifully logical and brilliantly expressive, in my opinion.


Crap subject and a crap and uneducated OP by you.
 

The Sentinel

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Most of the grammar and pronunciation errors that have been posted I too find mildly annoying; also the ubiquitous:

"Orders now been taken for Christmas Parties, birthdays, etc." as if they're not taking any more.

I'm quite fond of some of the colourful and expresive Hiberno-isms posters have listed.

Children from Mayo on school tours to Dublin always paid a visit to the Ezoo.
That is a strange one because the Dubs I knock around with often refer to the zoo as the azoo.
 

Cai

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Failing to 'run' the verb. Writing 'bu i mi ddweud' instead of 'dywedais'.

Why use 4 words when you can say the same thing with just the one?
 

Dame_Enda

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Expressions like "Amaziballs".
 

Gurdiev77

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I don't mind when people say it, but when they write it down, like they don't know it's not a word at all, that's just being stupid and that does annoy me.
the funny thing is it's become a word. I'm not even sure what it derives from .
Is 'look' as in 'look here '?
 


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