What parallels are there between the housing crises in Ireland and the UK?

Patslatt1

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Since Ireland has a multiple of the land area per head compared to the UK and the UK's Green Belt strictly prevents urban sprawl, housing prices should be way lower in Dublin than in UK cities of a similar size but they are not (see http://metro.co.uk/2018/02/02/what-is-the-average-house-price-in-cities-across-the-uk-7281172/ FX of £ is 1.13 euro). Maybe Dublin's planning system has similar features to the UK that artificially drives up prices?

An article by Matt Ridley in The Times March 5th "Housing crisis has been building for decades" https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/housing-crisis-has-been-building-fordecades-c5w2h2gcr (paywall) discusses Britain's unnecessarily restrictive planning. Key points:
[]Average rents in Britain are almost 50% higher than average rents in Germany,France and crowded Holland
[]Britain's housing costs are absurdly high by international standards:eight times average earnings in England, fifteen in London
[]Instead of the typical European systems that give planning permission once the plan meets strict predefined regulations on such factors as fire safety and building height relative to street width,the UK system allows planners to have planning discretion
[]As a result of the latter, planning permission now depended on the whims of planners, the actions of rivals and the representation of objectors. Today,local plans...are vast unwieldy documents...subject to endless legal challenge and revision....Barriers to entry erected by planning play into the hands of large companies...requires you to spend big sums on consultants, lawyers and PR experts as you wear down the councils' planning teams and their ever growing list of questions over several years
[]Rent control, Help to Buy, affordable housing and bearing down on developers' land banks mostly address the symptoms

In Ireland, local planning offices vary their practices and a standardised system has yet to be set up. Extremely high rents in Dublin for a city of its size reflect poor planning and severe restrictions on densities of apartments. The government's principal approach so far has been to attack symptoms by slavishly copying the UK government measures in the last key point above.
 
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Alan Alda

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Its a global conspiracy.Its not an Eire thing or a UK thing or a UK/Eire thing.
 

fat finger

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Blame the vague term 'financial services'. The arrival of 'financial services' ALWAYS means housing costs in the target city will balloon. We saw it in Britain with Big Bang thirty years ago, the setting up in London of American and Japanese banks to exploit 'new opportunities in financial services' - and property prices there surged ten times within the following ten years. So it was not surprising that the same trick would be played on Ireland, and the roll out of the IFSC in Dublin, which surprise surprise (not) increased property prices there ten times within ten years. It's all down to better 'financial services', innit
 

blokesbloke

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In the UK it is the fault of something called Brexit.

In Ireland it is the fault of the Irish government and their cheerleaders in the corrupt media, which is unacceptable in a Democratic Republic (copyright shiel).
 

wombat

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The similarity is that the housing demand is particularly bad in the Dublin and London areas but there are places in both countries where houses are a lot cheaper such as Longford or Sheffield.
 

statsman

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Let's just blame the Public Service workers and close the thread.
 

PBP voter

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it's pretty simple.

The credit crunch stopped or significantly reduced house building in the OECD.
 

PBP voter

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Not surprising that it's so high in Auz or NZ.

They have no social fabric to their society at all.
 

Dame_Enda

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Well in the UK legal services are not as closed to competition as in Ireland. They have legal partnerships, whereas in Ireland the govt has introduced barriers to entry to partnerships such as denial of access to the Law Library in the same legislation that allowed for partnerships.

In the London property market there is much dodgy Russian oligarch money too.
 

Dame_Enda

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Not surprising that it's so high in Auz or NZ.

They have no social fabric to their society at all.
Thats probably why the new NZ govt is banning non citizens from buying land.
 

PBP voter

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Thats probably why the new NZ govt is banning non citizens from buying land.
It hasnt work.

Their PM is a clown.
Homelessness crisis getting worse, not better - report | Newshub

It's going to get worse and worse.

She studied at Morrinsville College[15] and then attended the University of Waikato, graduating in 2001 with a Bachelor of Communication Studies (BCS) in politics and public relations.[16]
They need somebody with a degree in Civil Eng or Architecture or Surveying(Land or Building or Quantity) who has worked in the Industry. Or a Tradesman who has worked he way up to Contracts Manager in a construction company.

Not a bluffer who went to "third level" to learn how to read the news for a TV or Radio company.

Ardern was brought into politics by her aunt, a longstanding member of the Labour Party, who recruited a teenage Ardern to help her with campaigning for New Plymouth MP Harry Duynhoven during his re-election campaign at the 1999 general election.[17]
Just another bluffer who was brought into the fold by a family member.

I see our housing guy knows the industry well.

Murphy attended St Michael's College. He went onto study at University College Dublin (BA, English & Philosophy), and King's College London (MA, International Relations).[2]
:roll:
 

Patslatt1

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Blame the vague term 'financial services'. The arrival of 'financial services' ALWAYS means housing costs in the target city will balloon. We saw it in Britain with Big Bang thirty years ago, the setting up in London of American and Japanese banks to exploit 'new opportunities in financial services' - and property prices there surged ten times within the following ten years. So it was not surprising that the same trick would be played on Ireland, and the roll out of the IFSC in Dublin, which surprise surprise (not) increased property prices there ten times within ten years. It's all down to better 'financial services', innit
Financial services are not dominating the eonomy in Dublin, unlike London.
 

Patslatt1

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Well in the UK legal services are not as closed to competition as in Ireland. They have legal partnerships, whereas in Ireland the govt has introduced barriers to entry to partnerships such as denial of access to the Law Library in the same legislation that allowed for partnerships.

In the London property market there is much dodgy Russian oligarch money too.
I saw some international figures on litigation legal costs as a percent of litigation sums won. The UK stood out for very high charges of about 45% compared to other countries' 25% including Ireland.
 

Patslatt1

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It hasnt work.

Their PM is a clown.
Homelessness crisis getting worse, not better - report | Newshub

It's going to get worse and worse.



They need somebody with a degree in Civil Eng or Architecture or Surveying(Land or Building or Quantity) who has worked in the Industry. Or a Tradesman who has worked he way up to Contracts Manager in a construction company.

Not a bluffer who went to "third level" to learn how to read the news for a TV or Radio company.



Just another bluffer who was brought into the fold by a family member.

I see our housing guy knows the industry well.



:roll:
Before he became prime minister of the UK,Harold MacMillion was appointed by PM Winston Churchill in the late 1950s to create an ambitious housing building programme. He succeeded spectacularly as housing boomed throughout the 60s. As for his education, it was posh Eton college and Oxford. He probably had some business experience in the family publishing business.
 
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Spirit Of Newgrange

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White flight. Some places nobody with 2 quid to rub together will buy property and live in.

West Dublin , East London.
 

razorblade

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If there's a housing crisis then just where exactly are all these immigrants that Damon Ryan wants to bring in going to go has he thought things through at all.
 

Patslatt1

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If there's a housing crisis then just where exactly are all these immigrants that Damon Ryan wants to bring in going to go has he thought things through at all.
Border counties which built too many houses thanks to tax writeoffs in the Celtic Tiger?
 

boldfenianman

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White flight. Some places nobody with 2 quid to rub together will buy property and live in.

West Dublin , East London.
You are mistaken. I know London better than I know Dublin. Prices in parts of East London are ridiculous. Not all. A good bit though.
 


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