What value is CCTV after this case?

McTell

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No
https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/courts/girl-settles-case-for-50000-after-private-eye-took-her-photo-36892240.html


A lady claims under a policy - that's what we buy them for.

The insurer checks if she is as ill as she claims to be - that's what we pay PIs for.

But, in the process, the lady's child is photographed without anyone giving consent, and it ends up costing another 50,000. So, where do we draw the line on this? The judge was dealing with the case in front of him, not the issue of CCTV and everyone.

CCTV has been a good thing overall, but now we could get a situation where (say) I am taken to court for speeding, there is photo evidence, and my defence is that I never gave consent for me or my car to be photographed.


To me it seems OK that to keep insurance costs down, PIs have to do their work, even if their snaps include all sorts of other people - who can be blacked out if it comes to court.

50,000 for having my pic taken, yes, I'd get out of bed for that, and I'm no Kate Moss.
 


statsman

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https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/courts/girl-settles-case-for-50000-after-private-eye-took-her-photo-36892240.html


A lady claims under a policy - that's what we buy them for.

The insurer checks if she is as ill as she claims to be - that's what we pay PIs for.

But, in the process, the lady's child is photographed without anyone giving consent, and it ends up costing another 50,000. So, where do we draw the line on this? The judge was dealing with the case in front of him, not the issue of CCTV and everyone.

CCTV has been a good thing overall, but now we could get a situation where (say) I am taken to court for speeding, there is photo evidence, and my defence is that I never gave consent for me or my car to be photographed.


To me it seems OK that to keep insurance costs down, PIs have to do their work, even if their snaps include all sorts of other people - who can be blacked out if it comes to court.

50,000 for having my pic taken, yes, I'd get out of bed for that, and I'm no Kate Moss.
This has nothing to do with CCTV, does it?
 

mr_anderson

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Does it make a difference if the child was photographed in a public or private place ?
 

McTell

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No
This has nothing to do with CCTV, does it?

Hmm, CCTV is photography without consent. Case was about photography without consent. Why does one allow you to be paid compo, and the other not?
 

former wesleyan

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Hmm, CCTV is photography without consent. Case was about photography without consent. Why does one allow you to be paid compo, and the other not?
Not if there is clear signage it's not.
 

McTell

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No
The parents also got a payment of 60,000.

That was a separate matter. The daughter's trauma in this case.

Just like I would suffer trauma big time if I was photographed by someone who had a reasonable excuse for photographing me and mine.


Irish Life was now offering Emma a settlement of €50,000 and costs. Emma, after finding out about the activities of the private detective, had developed psychological trauma.

He said the law in relation to privacy was "a tricky area" and it could also be extremely difficult to recover damages under the Data Protection Act.
 

statsman

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Saw that.
But can you take a photo of anyone in a public place ?
You have a right not to have your personal data, including your photograph, collected without your consent. With photos, there are exceptions made for artistic and journalistic purposes, but certainly having someone follow you into a hotel, where you have reasonable expectations of privacy, and take photos and video images of you is well beyond the pale.
 

statsman

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That was a separate matter. The daughter's trauma in this case.

Just like I would suffer trauma big time if I was photographed by someone who had a reasonable excuse for photographing me and mine.


Irish Life was now offering Emma a settlement of €50,000 and costs. Emma, after finding out about the activities of the private detective, had developed psychological trauma.

He said the law in relation to privacy was "a tricky area" and it could also be extremely difficult to recover damages under the Data Protection Act.
But they didn't have a reasonable excuse, least of all for the child.
 

Bill

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You have a right not to have your personal data, including your photograph, collected without your consent. With photos, there are exceptions made for artistic and journalistic purposes, but certainly having someone follow you into a hotel, where you have reasonable expectations of privacy, and take photos and video images of you is well beyond the pale.
meh, just beat them until they are bleeding out their ears
 

McTell

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No

McTell

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No
But they didn't have a reasonable excuse, least of all for the child.

Then how is the PI to do his job? The common areas of a hotel /shop / pub are public when they are open to the public. Why shouldn't the PI snap how a claimant is interacting with his./her family?

The whole point of a PI doing this is to keep our insurance costs down, some of the highest in europe.
 

mr_anderson

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You have a right not to have your personal data, including your photograph, collected without your consent. With photos, there are exceptions made for artistic and journalistic purposes, but certainly having someone follow you into a hotel, where you have reasonable expectations of privacy, and take photos and video images of you is well beyond the pale.
I get the hotel bit. I'd consider that private property.
But on a street, can anyone take a photo of you ?
 

CookieMonster

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https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/courts/girl-settles-case-for-50000-after-private-eye-took-her-photo-36892240.html


A lady claims under a policy - that's what we buy them for.

The insurer checks if she is as ill as she claims to be - that's what we pay PIs for.

But, in the process, the lady's child is photographed without anyone giving consent, and it ends up costing another 50,000. So, where do we draw the line on this? The judge was dealing with the case in front of him, not the issue of CCTV and everyone.

CCTV has been a good thing overall, but now we could get a situation where (say) I am taken to court for speeding, there is photo evidence, and my defence is that I never gave consent for me or my car to be photographed.


To me it seems OK that to keep insurance costs down, PIs have to do their work, even if their snaps include all sorts of other people - who can be blacked out if it comes to court.

50,000 for having my pic taken, yes, I'd get out of bed for that, and I'm no Kate Moss.
The case doesn't relate to CCTV. It relates to a private investigator taking photographs if a child.
 

*EPIC SUCCESS*

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Then how is the PI to do his job? The common areas of a hotel /shop / pub are public when they are open to the public. Why shouldn't the PI snap how a claimant is interacting with his./her family?

The whole point of a PI doing this is to keep our insurance costs down, some of the highest in europe.
Everybody knows that the high price of insurance is only partially down to fake claims. What is needed is criminal convictions of those who have been found to have knowingly made fake claims.
 

McTell

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No
The case doesn't relate to CCTV. It relates to a private investigator taking photographs if a child.

What is the differ? Someone out there is snapping you without your consent. Sauce for the goose and all that.
 

former wesleyan

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Irish Life was now offering Emma a settlement of €50,000 and costs. Emma, after finding out about the activities of the private detective, had developed psychological trauma.


Yeah. Right.

Trans :

My solicitor asked me if I'd any psychological trauma symptoms. I said no. He asked me again. I said no. He then held up a piece of paper with 50,000 written on it. I said yes.
 


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