Where now for Labour?

Clanrickard

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The recent opinion polls show Labour bouncing around the bottom at around 4%. Howlin has made little impact since he took over. I heard Dick Spring being interview a few weeks ago and he said Labour has been there before and will come back. I had thought so too but I am beggining to think this decline might be terminal. The left is a very crowded place at the moment with Labour, the Soc Dems, SF and the Alphabets not to mention independents who are inevitably populist. Certain parties that have been big, bigger than Labour, have disappeared. I am thinking of the Progressive Conservatives in Canada, the Federalist Party in the US and the Liberals in the UK.It is hard to see the usp of the Labour Party and it looks old and outdated.

The party has a fairly young fresh looking cadre at local level...https://www.labour.ie/people/localareareps/ and councillors https://www.labour.ie/people/localareareps/ but the question is can they turn these into seat getters in the medium term. The Labour Party comes across to me as a middle class party obsessed with social issues and with no real distinguishing economic policies. What can they do to make themselves stand out from the herd?
 


Betson

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Big difference between now and Dick Springs era is the strength of SF , they now occupy the space of the official left in Irish politics and are not going anywhere. Hard to see how Labour will get back again until SF get into power and become as unpopular as labour are now.
 

Telstar 62

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It's all a numbers game.

If they fall right after the next election - the Labour lads and lassies
could be back in power.:D

And the FG/FF/SF heads will be glad to have them!!:lol:

It would drive the Hard Left demented, of course.:p
 

ger12

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Wascurito

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They need to drop that non-entity of a leader and elect someone with some oomph like Alan Kelly.

It's no coincidence that the party that's leading in the polls (FG) is the one with the youngest leader.

Labour could steal a march on SF (still stuck in defend-Jarry mode) and elect a leader who would appeal to younger voters - not to mention his record of standing by his principles.
 

jmcc

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The first thing that Labour has to do is to depose the homunculus Howlin and have a leadership election. They also need to find some populist issue for which they can stand. Popular issues = votes. Voters don't care about SJW issues and fewer still vote for them.
 

Clanrickard

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They need to drop that non-entity of a leader and elect someone with some oomph like Alan Kelly.

It's no coincidence that the party that's leading in the polls (FG) is the one with the youngest leader.

Labour could steal a march on SF (still stuck in defend-Jarry mode) and elect a leader who would appeal to younger voters - not to mention his record of standing by his principles.
Do you think Kelly could do it? I think he'd be better than Howlin but I still see the need fro Labour to stand for something different.
 

jmcc

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Do you think Kelly could do it? I think he'd be better than Howlin but I still see the need fro Labour to stand for something different.
Kelly makes for good headlines and media coverage. Howlin is an irrelevant little git. The problem with Kelly is that he is still associated with that Irish Water scam. The rest of the Labour TDs seem to have one more election cycle at best. And there are the Local Elections coming up which may see Labour decimated at a grassroots level.
 

Sync

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They desperately needed to pivot after the last election and say "The last Labour generation's finished it's duty, we're on to the future" and utilise that young talent under the caretaking of the youngest TD they had.

Which unfortunately is Kelly, but still: Better than someone irrevocably associated with the only Labour policy of the last 12 years of "Get as many pensions for our TDs as possible".

Labour don't have social priorities, they don't have economic priorities. They've been barren for some time. They needed to do something extreme and, as Spring's attitude exemplifies, they don't get it that everything they were has been taken over by SF.
 

Dame_Enda

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Parties that enter coalition as junior partners tend to be wiped out. They are expected to act as watchdog, but as FG could have done a deal with Independents Labour really couldn't. Sort-of like the PDs in 2002-7.
 

Northsideman

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Labour for some crazy reason are still patting themselves on the back about the great job they did saving us all from ruination. They still can't understand why the average pleb isn't down on their knees paying homage to them. They were our savours and we are a utterly ungrateful bunch of ba$tards.

They still don't get it and therein lies their present plight.
 

Wascurito

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Do you think Kelly could do it? I think he'd be better than Howlin but I still see the need fro Labour to stand for something different.
Alan Kelly got a massive amount of abuse on social media for his support for water charges but he stuck to his guns. Whatever you might think of his stance on the overall issue (I support him), any politician who stands by his principles like that is worthy of admiration IMHO.

However, fundamentally, it's about his age. Check out the results of the French and Austrian elections. Young leaders have traction.
 

Mercurial

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Alan Kelly got a massive amount of abuse on social media for his support for water charges but he stuck to his guns. Whatever you might think of his stance on the overall issue (I support him), any politician who stands by his principles like that is worthy of admiration IMHO.

However, fundamentally, it's about his age. Check out the results of the French and Austrian elections. Young leaders have traction.
There's nothing admirable about standing by your principles if they are sh*t principles.
 


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