Where's the best country to emigrate to?

borntorum

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I'm fairly young, and luckily don't have a mortgage or other major financial ties to this country.

I love Ireland, but the idea of paying taxes for the rest of my working life, not towards creating a decent society, but towards paying for the catastrophic mistakes of a group of people of whom I had no point nor gained any benefit, I find soul-crushing.

I'm seriously beginning to consider getting out of here and moving somewhere where the political and economic systems are working at even a basic level. What regions or countries should young people consider making a better life in?
 


fun tzu

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How's your Norwegian?
 

Tea Party Patriot

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I'm fairly young, and luckily don't have a mortgage or other major financial ties to this country.

I love Ireland, but the idea of paying taxes for the rest of my working life, not towards creating a decent society, but towards paying for the catastrophic mistakes of a group of people of whom I had no point nor gained any benefit, I find soul-crushing.

I'm seriously beginning to consider getting out of here and moving somewhere where the political and economic systems are working at even a basic level. What regions or countries should young people consider making a better life in?
Australia and Canada are best right now. However in one you will freeze and in the other you may be in danger of melting :)
 

SideysGhost

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Me, I've always been angling towards Germany and/or Switzerland. France and Holland are good too. Norway, Finland, Sweden and Singapore all have their attractions. If yer an inveterate anglophone, Canada is probably your best bet - UK, US, Oz and NZ all have their problems and turbulent times ahead. If you enjoy the challenge of an emerging nation, then one of the BRICs, Vietnam or Malaysia may all be nice places to be for the next 10 years.

Loads of options really, just depends on your skillset and the kind of lifestyle you are into. Don't let people tell you "Ah sure there's nothing out there" - some of the world is in deep crisis through atrocious economic and financial mismanagement. But plenty of places are doing OK - just not the usual traditional destinations for Irish emigrants.
 

Odyessus

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I'm fairly young, and luckily don't have a mortgage or other major financial ties to this country.

I love Ireland, but the idea of paying taxes for the rest of my working life, not towards creating a decent society, but towards paying for the catastrophic mistakes of a group of people of whom I had no point nor gained any benefit, I find soul-crushing.

I'm seriously beginning to consider getting out of here and moving somewhere where the political and economic systems are working at even a basic level. What regions or countries should young people consider making a better life in?

Good luck finding a country with lower taxes than Ireland.
 

borntorum

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Me, I've always been angling towards Germany and/or Switzerland. France and Holland are good too. Norway, Finland, Sweden and Singapore all have their attractions. If yer an inveterate anglophone, Canada is probably your best bet - UK, US, Oz and NZ all have their problems and turbulent times ahead. If you enjoy the challenge of an emerging nation, then one of the BRICs, Vietnam or Malaysia may all be nice places to be for the next 10 years.
Thanks. I've travelled to a good few countries over the past five or six years, and when I was in China I certainly thought that this was the place to be if you wanted to be at the centre of the world's emerging power. But nowhere beats Europe for culture and lifestyle, and I have a bit of the language (not fluent, but something to start with) so perhaps la belle France might be the ultimate place to look at. I really like Germans and Germany but unfortunately can't speak a word of the vernacular so probably best to avoid.

I feel sad and even a bit guilty wanting to leave, but the social contract is meant to mean that the individual citizen contributed towards the community and the state in return for a provision of decent basic services. I'm more than happy to live in a social democratic state with relatively high taxes, but in this country the State has broken its side of the social contract for at least the next decade and possibly longer, so why should I feel indebted to it?
 

borntorum

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Good luck finding a country with lower taxes than Ireland.
My preference would be a European social democracy, i.e relatively high taxes for good services.

Another valid and reasonable option is the US model, i.e. low taxes and low services.

What is not fair or reasonable is what we are going to be asked to put up with for the medium to long-term future, i.e. high taxes to service the nationalised debt of speculators.
 

SideysGhost

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I feel sad and even a bit guilty wanting to leave, but the social contract is meant to mean that the individual citizen contributed towards the community and the state in return for a provision of decent basic services. I'm more than happy to live in a social democratic state with relatively high taxes, but in this country the State has broken its side of the social contract for at least the next decade and possibly longer, so why should I feel indebted to it?
One of the best, and most distressing, posts ever made on p.ie.

You are entirely correct. This rotten Govt has broken the social contract implicit in any relationship between government and governed. They are traitors, not just to Ireland but to the entire concept of representative constitutional democracy.

None of us owe this shower of drunken crooks a damn thing - and anyone in the public sphere that will still obey their orders is complicit in national treachery.

Time to choose sides, kids.
 

Feelinglost

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I'm fairly young, and luckily don't have a mortgage or other major financial ties to this country.

I love Ireland, but the idea of paying taxes for the rest of my working life, not towards creating a decent society, but towards paying for the catastrophic mistakes of a group of people of whom I had no point nor gained any benefit, I find soul-crushing.

I'm seriously beginning to consider getting out of here and moving somewhere where the political and economic systems are working at even a basic level. What regions or countries should young people consider making a better life in?
I too, love Ireland, and it's people. That is why I am staying for as long as is humanly possible. I won't lie, the thought of leaving this place has been on my mind for many years, none more so than in the last few days. I have seen this "crisis" coming for many years, so unlike many I am in no way shocked by the current state of affairs.

Often when we are faced we fear, our initial instinct is to run. I say don't run, stand your ground, for now is the time to become a true man. Stand with your people, protest in a peaceful manner, and together as a people we can over come these goons. United we can never be defeated. By all means have a plan to exit this Country if things become unbearable, but try to stay as long as you can. Don't let the fear get a grip of you always remember, fear makes the wolf seem bigger.
 

dresden8

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I'm fairly young, and luckily don't have a mortgage or other major financial ties to this country.

I love Ireland, but the idea of paying taxes for the rest of my working life, not towards creating a decent society, but towards paying for the catastrophic mistakes of a group of people of whom I had no point nor gained any benefit, I find soul-crushing.

I'm seriously beginning to consider getting out of here and moving somewhere where the political and economic systems are working at even a basic level. What regions or countries should young people consider making a better life in?
Don't let the door hit your arse on the way out. Byeeeeeeeeeeee.
 

derm0t

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Don't let the door hit your arse on the way out. Byeeeeeeeeeeee.
I left in 1993. One of the joys was not having to deal with reptiles like yourself, Dresden. Your sort seems peculiarly common in the Motherland, for some reason. In-breeding, or maybe the Yeats quote "Too long a sacrifice can make a stone of the heart" would be a more lyrical way of explaining your callous stupidity.

I. Have had. Enough. OF YOU! (Kicks face). Troll falls into flaming lava.

*

Regarding the US, I moved to L.A. in 1993. Culture shock can be extreme, but you can adapt to many things. That said, if you think the U.S. is an improvement, that may be relative. This place seems to be coming apart at the seams. Unlike Ireland, it controls its own currency, and that currency is the world's reserve, so that's been giving them wiggle room. Other than that, all they're doing is trying to keep a shattered train on the tracks...and finding it harder all the time.

Think of the U.S. regionally. The SW, PNW, SE, etc. I'm only here still because I found a nice niche in the Pacific North West (Oregon/Washington). Other than that, I'd have moved somewhere else.

I spend 2006 in Canada, in New Brunswick. If you haven't lived in a snowy climate, you might find it a challenge. Some can, I couldn't. One year was more than enough. It wasn't the cold (you can dress for that), but the grim ritual of having to wear a spacesuit just to go to the shops. The perpetual white and grey for 4 to 6 months ... bloody hell. Granted, that was a small town; it might be better if you were in Toronto.

I'd go back to Canada, but only if British Columbia was available. A very similar climate to Ireland, which I like (which is why I'm in Portland Oregon now).

If you try to get into Canada, there's the federal path, but there's also the provincial. Provincial governments offer immigration as well, and I was told that this was a little bit easier than the federal. Maybe that'll be of help. Vancouver is a beautiful city, and Victoria, just across the water, is a little piece of heaven.

Other than that, not too much more I can say. If you work in animation, or anyone else, you should shoot me an email. Lots of Irish in the animation industry - many from the late 80s/early 90s, ex-Bluth people like myself.

I wish you, and anyone thinking of making the move, the best of luck.
 

kerdasi amaq

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Iceland could be a good location to move to. There's a catch you have to learn Icelandic.
 

mistercrabs

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I left in 1993. One of the joys was not having to deal with reptiles like yourself, Dresden. Your sort seems peculiarly common in the Motherland, for some reason. In-breeding, or maybe the Yeats quote "Too long a sacrifice can make a stone of the heart" would be a more lyrical way of explaining your callous stupidity.

I. Have had. Enough. OF YOU! (Kicks face). Troll falls into flaming lava.
I love the tone of detached, patronising sophistication, like you've seen what the civilised world is like and you're doing everything you can to guide those like you into the light. There's something deeply depressing about how a lot of the most intelligent Irish people have a complete distaste for their own country. Maybe if you and your ilk didn't have such an inferiority complex and stayed here to make the country a better place, we wouldn't be in this mess right now.
 

danger here

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I love the tone of detached, patronising sophistication, like you've seen what the civilised world is like and you're doing everything you can to guide those like you into the light. There's something deeply depressing about how a lot of the most intelligent Irish people have a complete distaste for their own country. Maybe if you and your ilk didn't have such an inferiority complex and stayed here to make the country a better place, we wouldn't be in this mess right now.
What are you talking about? When you live in a real society where people are not afraid to pay taxes because they know that whether they agree or disagree with a political setup,they know the country is put first and that is that.Not like Ireland where village idiots like Ned O'Keefe decide whether enough people in a village in his constituency gave him enough votes to fund a school or an Ireland where you go to your TD to get your passport or medical card fast tracked.
I left Ireland at 25 and believe me I won't be back if I was offered €1 Billion,the country is rotten to the core,political class,electorate,unions,public service,church,right down to the mentality of people like you (no offence meant).Time has moved on but the same auld problems are there and will never change.I want to live in a proper functioning society,and not a cowboy film set with drunken leaders in helicopters.Ireland is like something from a former Soviet republic at the moment.

To OP; many options depending on what you feel comfortable with and what your priorities are.
Denmark,Holland,Germany,France,Switzerland,Poland,Russia,Brazil,Chile,India,China,Japan,Korea,Canada,NZ are good tips.
 
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CanadianCelt

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There's something deeply depressing about how a lot of the most intelligent Irish people have a complete distaste for their own country. Maybe if you and your ilk didn't have such an inferiority complex and stayed here to make the country a better place, we wouldn't be in this mess right now.
You're right. of course you're right and those of us that left Ireland should be ashamed of ourselves. B.S.
You haven't a clue. You sit there slagging off people that want to make something out of their lives. You are happy to live in a corrupt gombeen run country and expect handout after handout. Well, the well has run dry and one reason "the most intelligent Irish people have a complete distaste for their own country" is that they can see what's going on. I have looked over some of your other posts where you state things like "I think the state should provide health care and education", at what cost? Who pays for it?
But then when I read another of your useless quotes I see "I'm from a working class family in a run-down part of Limerick, so go ************************ yourself."
This probably explains a lot.
 

CanadianCelt

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now back to the topic...
Vancouver is a great city. Economy is doing well, but one has to be prepared to spend some time looking for work. Social welfare system is a lot stricter and new immigrants should not expect handouts. Rent is expensive. Weather is very much like Ireland except lots more sunshine in the summer. People are genuinely friendly and helpful and like to see others do well, unlike many people in Ireland who only want to knock successful people.
No one cares what, if any, religion you are. You never hear people complain that "they're coming over here and taking our jobs". Medical care is good....you pay a monthly insurance, or your work pays it for you, and it allows you go to any doctor without having to pay for the visit. Lots of companies also pay prescription fees, dental and optical and other benefits. People that own property pay a property tax that covers utilities, roads, education etc. You don't have to pay a road tax, no tolls, no tv licence or a tax for the privilege of having a credit card. I've been here 14 years and will never return to Ireland unless to visit.
 

Anglo Celt

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now back to the topic...
Vancouver is a great city. Economy is doing well, but one has to be prepared to spend some time looking for work. Social welfare system is a lot stricter and new immigrants should not expect handouts. Rent is expensive. Weather is very much like Ireland except lots more sunshine in the summer. People are genuinely friendly and helpful and like to see others do well, unlike many people in Ireland who only want to knock successful people.
No one cares what, if any, religion you are. You never hear people complain that "they're coming over here and taking our jobs". Medical care is good....you pay a monthly insurance, or your work pays it for you, and it allows you go to any doctor without having to pay for the visit. Lots of companies also pay prescription fees, dental and optical and other benefits. People that own property pay a property tax that covers utilities, roads, education etc. You don't have to pay a road tax, no tolls, no tv licence or a tax for the privilege of having a credit card. I've been here 14 years and will never return to Ireland unless to visit.
:eek:

sounds just perfect! I've been to Ontario once before and loved it. Always thought that it'd be the perfect place to live.
 

ONQ

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If yer an inveterate anglophone, Canada is probably your best bet - UK, US, Oz and NZ all have their problems and turbulent times ahead.
Hi Syd,

What kind of problems is NZ looking forward to? I had considered it only recently and it seemed to be a reasonable alternative. Climate, people, language, mix of cultures, access to the Pacific Rim economies, tolerance, large ex pat populations from both Ireland and England - what's the story?

TIA

ONQ.
 


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