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Whither now for the parties of social democracy in Ireland?

Cato

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Joined
Aug 21, 2005
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20,608
I placed this in Labour but it refers to any party that espouses social democratic values. The author of the article linked to below is a former member of the Labour Party but who wandered away because of their record in government. In the article, he discusses the way forward for social democrats and I have the feeling that it is, in the main, an appeal to his former party and also to those, like himself, who parted company with them.

https://danoneill.org/2016/05/30/inspiration-from-unlikely-quarters-a-challenge-for-social-democrats/

He quotes a report commissioned for UK Labour but which he clearly thinks applies to their Irish sister party:

“It is now largely a party of progressive, social liberals who value abstract, universalist principles such as equality, sustainability and social justice.”

“It is losing connection with the majority of voters who are either pragmatists in their voting habits or who hold socially conservative values of family, work, security, and fairness.”
An interesting discussion follows that on the three different kinds of voters: pioneers, prospectors, and settlers, detailing how each group may be appealed to, or alienated, and working out the implications for achieving progress (from a social democratic point of view).

He has a bit of a cut at the far left:

In Ireland, the far left as opposed to the social democratic left, engage in a type of nihilism that fundamentally alienates vast elements of the electorate, and promotes a poor vision of a society that knows what it is against, but ignores the values that make us stronger.


They argue for greater power for the state, while at the same time articulating a paradoxical ideology in which the state is a bogeyman that can’t be trusted.


They scoff at small c conservatism in a way that often undermines solidarity and cooperation while at the same time claiming that solidarity is key to our liberation.


They ignore the institution of the family (I refer to family in broad terms), making light of the fact that it is the family unit that often matters most to the outcomes of the most underprivileged in our society.
At times he strikes up an almost Burkean tone:

Far from tearing up honoured institutions and the fabric of the state and civil society without regard, the centre-left should be about protecting the gains of working people; about safeguarding the values and institutions our country can be proud of; and celebrating the civic institutions, the localities, stories and relationships that allow us to move forward as a society together, rather than as alienated, angsty individuals.
He also has several quotes from an unlikely source, or at least a source that is unlikely if you've ever met the chap and listened to his general views (I have).

His conclusion:

We need to challenge ourselves to leave our ideological comfort zones. Only through reaching outside our liberal silos can we build the consensus needed to truly change the political and social order to one which can provide people with not only bread, but roses too.


Let’s be clear – Either we do it, or the populists will step into the vacuum.
It's worth a read.
 


storybud1

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 25, 2011
Messages
6,742
I placed this in Labour but it refers to any party that espouses social democratic values. The author of the article linked to below is a former member of the Labour Party but who wandered away because of their record in government. In the article, he discusses the way forward for social democrats and I have the feeling that it is, in the main, an appeal to his former party and also to those, like himself, who parted company with them.

https://danoneill.org/2016/05/30/inspiration-from-unlikely-quarters-a-challenge-for-social-democrats/

He quotes a report commissioned for UK Labour but which he clearly thinks applies to their Irish sister party:



An interesting discussion follows that on the three different kinds of voters: pioneers, prospectors, and settlers, detailing how each group may be appealed to, or alienated, and working out the implications for achieving progress (from a social democratic point of view).

He has a bit of a cut at the far left:



At times he strikes up an almost Burkean tone:



He also has several quotes from an unlikely source, or at least a source that is unlikely if you've ever met the chap and listened to his general views (I have).

His conclusion:



It's worth a read.
He clearly thinks Politics is about serving the people and not a business, they are a bunch of ruthless self serving little pension chasers, few have the vision, capability, courage to tell the truth and offend those that need to be offended.

The far left simply don't work, just like the far right, they are the 20% of nutters that the other 80% pay for. We are a wealthy Country that needs to wise up, stop putting up with the fooking assh0les that cause all the mayhem and just use common sense a lot more. Unless you can make common sense very sexy or a great orator then you will not get the media's attention.
 

farnaby

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2006
Messages
1,967
At times he strikes up an almost Burkean tone:


Far from tearing up honoured institutions and the fabric of the state and civil society without regard, the centre-left should be about protecting the gains of working people; about safeguarding the values and institutions our country can be proud of; and celebrating the civic institutions, the localities, stories and relationships that allow us to move forward as a society together, rather than as alienated, angsty individuals.
Ironically David Cameron's forgotten Big Society initiative had similar aims but was mauled by both right and left, the latter seeing it as an attempt to transfer to social entrepreneurs and community volunteers what were previously untouchable public sector jobs.
 

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