Who will be Ireland's Nick Clegg by this time next year?

borntorum

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2008
Messages
12,633
Andrew Rawnsley in today's Observer writes about how Nick Clegg has swiftly turned from Britain's hippest politician just before their GE into the hate figure of the current government, due principally to the Lib Dem's u-turn on university fees.

In most governments with a highly contentious programme, there is a hate figure who arouses great anger in sections of the population. Before the election, many of us expected this position to be filled by George Osborne who seemed a natural for the role. He thought so himself. As it has turned out, the cunning chancellor has kept himself at one remove from the frontline by rationing his appearances to setpiece speeches, announcements and infrequent interviews. It is instead the Lib Dem leader, the erstwhile "nice Nick", who has become the lightning rod for discontent during the government's first significant trial of will.
It makes one wonder who will be the figure of hate in our next government? Whomever is finance minister? Or the minister whose actions in government seem most different to his pre-election rhetoric (Gilmore?)? The current administration is roundly despised, but I suppose that Cowen, as a failed Taoiseach and the previous Min for Finance, is the most loathed.

Nick Clegg's unexpectedly swift journey from idol to hate figure | Andrew Rawnsley | Comment is free | The Observer
 


disgruntledcitizen

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 19, 2009
Messages
405
Gilmore seems the most likely candidate for that role given the populist rhetoric and amazing ability to save 400M from the PS costs in a year without any details as to how.
 

Red_93

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
4,572
if Burton is MoF it will be her. Gilmore is too clever.
 

oggy

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
8,900
For some reason message board users refuse to mention the two most dreaded words in economics, inflation and deflation. The economy inflated massively from 2000 to 2008, not only in prices but in inflated expectations the boom boom would go on forever. Only a liar would deny hovering on top of the list of catchcries was "RIP-OFF Ireland ! " Property prices rose to extortion levels. My favourite to use was " FFS a cup of lousy coffee in Spain is €1.50 but here its no less than €3.5o ! " Personal experience was three builders pricing themselves out of extension we wanted built because they were too busy. The whole inflation problem was guaranteed to explode in our faces and didnt it do just that.
We have a shocking banks problems, national debt problem, budget deficit problem and we will sort them out in time. We will not have a hope of winning our battles ahead if we do not bring our inflation under control. Our biggest inflation problem of all is in public expenditure. The need for deflation and the need to explain what deflation means has been touched on by the government when they talk about "competiveness" but thats not good enough.
The coalition 1982/1987 entered government with one task only, to crush the 20% + crazy inflation rate. Tax rates of 35% and 65%, VAT rate of 35%, VAT on utilities was introduced, VAT at point of entry for imports and a lot more I cannot recall right now. It was all horrendous stuff and its main effect was to scare the sh1t out of the business community. Massive job losses followed and the national debt was doubled to pay mainly for the increased social welfare costs. All through their period that coalition never once used the word deflation to describe their policies
By this time next year those who are seen as the great saviours of the nation FG/Lab will have so many Nick Clegg's in their ranks a team of clinical psychologists will be on standby to help the government cope with the vile abuse from the people and the likes of me vindictive to the core of our beings
 

borntorum

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2008
Messages
12,633
By this time next year those who are seen as the great saviours of the nation FG/Lab will have so many Nick Clegg's in their ranks a team of clinical psychologists will be on standby to help the government cope with the vile abuse from the people and the likes of me vindictive to the core of our beings
:lol: Jesus, I'd say the recent levels of nastiness in Irish politics aren't going to dissipate anytime soon. FFers at this stage must be looking forward to opposition (assuming they hold on to their seats) so they can attack FG, and particularly Labour, they way the opposition have attacked them. It's not going to be pretty.
 

Panopticon

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2009
Messages
5,575
You mean who will fill the role occupied in the UK by the nice media man, "our Obama", the leader of the idealist left-wing party, elected on a populist manifesto, eager to form a coalition with a bigger conservative partner, forced by the incompetence of the previous government to implement budget cuts that harm their base and violate their pre-election promises to solve everything with no pain for anyone, sees his poll numbers collapse when hope clashes with reality - and loses?

No, I can't think who that could possibly be.
 

Marcos the black

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
18,458
For some reason message board users refuse to mention the two most dreaded words in economics, inflation and deflation. The economy inflated massively from 2000 to 2008, not only in prices but in inflated expectations the boom boom would go on forever. Only a liar would deny hovering on top of the list of catchcries was "RIP-OFF Ireland ! " Property prices rose to extortion levels. My favourite to use was " FFS a cup of lousy coffee in Spain is €1.50 but here its no less than €3.5o ! " Personal experience was three builders pricing themselves out of extension we wanted built because they were too busy. The whole inflation problem was guaranteed to explode in our faces and didnt it do just that.
We have a shocking banks problems, national debt problem, budget deficit problem and we will sort them out in time. We will not have a hope of winning our battles ahead if we do not bring our inflation under control. Our biggest inflation problem of all is in public expenditure. The need for deflation and the need to explain what deflation means has been touched on by the government when they talk about "competiveness" but thats not good enough.
The coalition 1982/1987 entered government with one task only, to crush the 20% + crazy inflation rate. Tax rates of 35% and 65%, VAT rate of 35%, VAT on utilities was introduced, VAT at point of entry for imports and a lot more I cannot recall right now. It was all horrendous stuff and its main effect was to scare the sh1t out of the business community. Massive job losses followed and the national debt was doubled to pay mainly for the increased social welfare costs. All through their period that coalition never once used the word deflation to describe their policies
By this time next year those who are seen as the great saviours of the nation FG/Lab will have so many Nick Clegg's in their ranks a team of clinical psychologists will be on standby to help the government cope with the vile abuse from the people and the likes of me vindictive to the core of our beings

Just put this on another thread... but seeing as how you're here too.....
While watching TV with my kids today I came across a cartoon called "Oggy and the Cockroaches" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oggy_and_the_Cockroaches) and I thought: Isn't that appropriate. :lol::lol:
 

borntorum

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2008
Messages
12,633
You mean who will fill the role occupied in the UK by the nice media man, "our Obama", the leader of the idealist left-wing party, elected on a populist manifesto, eager to form a coalition with a bigger conservative partner, forced by the incompetence of the previous government to implement budget cuts that harm their base and violate their pre-election promises to solve everything with no pain for anyone, sees his poll numbers collapse when hope clashes with reality - and loses?

No, I can't think who that could possibly be.
Well, yeah, I suppose it's pretty clear who the analogous politician here is. But the media environment is much different. I think that the next government will be given a lot of leeway by much of the media for quite a long time. Whatever you think about this government, it's obvious that 90% of the media have been out to get them for three years at the least - for their own sense of worth they're not going to turn on the other crowd, and in particular Dublin media favourite Gilmore, anytime soon.

On the other hand, the Lib Dems have no natural media base and are loathed by both Tories and Labour. The Guardian supported them in a fit of pique before the last election but have turned on them now with a vengeance. Clegg was put up on a pedestal, and as always with the British media, there's nothing they like doing more than knocking people down having built them up. The Lib Dems and Clegg are being savaged by left and right. Futhermore, most of the attacks on them are due to the u-turn on college fees. Gilmore has been too savvy and cynical to create any such obvious hostages to fortune. So while people will be pissed off with him and the next government, I don't necessarily envisage any particular issue around which anger will coalesce.

Given that, I think it's possible that people are more likely to pick on Enda, if, as most suspects, he turns out to be a less-than-inspiring Taoiseach. And the Dublin media dislike him almost as much as they hate Cowen, so he won't get any sort of honeymoon
 

oggy

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
8,900
Just put this on another thread... but seeing as how you're here too.....
While watching TV with my kids today I came across a cartoon called "Oggy and the Cockroaches" (Oggy and the Cockroaches - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) and I thought: Isn't that appropriate. :lol::lol:
Ah but I bet that was a nice Oggy and not like this Oggy who upsets the cosy little cartoon world of the ABFF. Now that I think of it I dont know where I got this name from
 

Panopticon

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2009
Messages
5,575
Well, yeah, I suppose it's pretty clear who the analogous politician here is. But the media environment is much different. I think that the next government will be given a lot of leeway by much of the media for quite a long time. Whatever you think about this government, it's obvious that 90% of the media have been out to get them for three years at the least - for their own sense of worth they're not going to turn on the other crowd, and in particular Dublin media favourite Gilmore, anytime soon.

On the other hand, the Lib Dems have no natural media base and are loathed by both Tories and Labour. The Guardian supported them in a fit of pique before the last election but have turned on them now with a vengeance. Clegg was put up on a pedestal, and as always with the British media, there's nothing they like doing more than knocking people down having built them up. The Lib Dems and Clegg are being savaged by left and right. Futhermore, most of the attacks on them are due to the u-turn on college fees. Gilmore has been too savvy and cynical to create any such obvious hostages to fortune. So while people will be pissed off with him and the next government, I don't necessarily envisage any particular issue around which anger will coalesce.

Given that, I think it's possible that people are more likely to pick on Enda, if, as most suspects, he turns out to be a less-than-inspiring Taoiseach. And the Dublin media dislike him almost as much as they hate Cowen, so he won't get any sort of honeymoon
Yeah. Let me argue against my own post:
- our government has been far more incompetent than the ex-government of the UK, so it won't recover support as rapidly (even though UK Labour has been truly incompetent, the country hasn't actually lost its sovereignty etc);
- we are used to coalitions in this country, and Labour is a party of power in this country, so people won't be idiots about how parties have to compromise in coalition, unlike many of the English who had never enjoyed a real coalition government in their lifetimes.

On the other hand, I don't agree that the government is the victim of some media conspiracy. RTÉ has only been onside with the opposition since the night they realised the Department of Finance was lying to them about the bailout. Overnight, they immediately became more sympathetic to opposition than government. The newspapers have their own biases but the Sindo could be described as similar in its support schedule to RTÉ, except more strongly pro-government before the IMF intervention.
 

borntorum

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2008
Messages
12,633
Since, given the time of the year that's in it, we're resurrecting some old threads for the sh1ts and giggles...

I think we probably know the answer to the question in the thread title now.

One of my own comments screams out though:

Futhermore, most of the attacks on them are due to the u-turn on college fees. Gilmore has been too savvy and cynical to create any such obvious hostages to fortune.
I can only assume, for my own sake, that this was written before Lab had their sh1t fit a week before the election and started promising the sun moon and stars. "Frankfurt's way or Labour's way"...that will be Gilmore's epitaph
 


Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top