Who's the chief pall-bearer here?

Malcolm Redfellow

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Here's a small problem:

[video=youtube;qU16rhRHP7M]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qU16rhRHP7M[/video]

Aha! You've already spotted it! So help me here ...

The story so far:

It began with a twitter exchange between @djmgaffneyw4 and myself.

@djmgaffneyw4 kicked off:

I could do without English politicians venting their irrelevant opinions on Irish unification but what 'Corbyn spokesman' said was utterly uncontroversial, as full quote shows. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/jeremy-corbyn-ireland-reunification-north-border-belfast-visit-labour-good-friday-agreement-a8366211.html …

"Pressed on Mr Corbyn’s opinions on reunification, his official spokesman said: “Over the years he has made his position clear that the majority of those people across the whole island of Ireland wanted to see that outcome, a united Ireland.

“But in the context of the Good Friday Agreement that can only come about through that constitutional process that is laid down in the agreement and Jeremy fully supports that.”​
My somewhat tedious interruption was to agree: Corbyn was being honourably reticent in his argument. Then, as so often, I suffered a small brain-stutter. And that led me elsewhere ...

After all, the Labour Manifesto of 1918 was definitive:
Freedom for Ireland

The principles which Labour acclaims as Allied war aims it will apply to our own subject peoples. Freedom for Ireland and India it claims as democratic rights, and it will extend to all subject peoples the right of self-determination within the British Commonwealth of Free Nations. Labour's appeal to the people is not a sectional appeal, unless an appeal which excludes only militarists, profiteers, and place-hunters be regarded as sectional. It includes all who are determined that the fruits of victory shall not be wasted in the interests of riches or reaction. Especially does Labour appeal to two sections of the community - to the soldiers and sailors who have fought the nation's battles abroad, and to the men and women workers at home.
As far as I know, the Party has never greatly resiled from that position. Which is why, among other reasons, initiating Labour Party operations in the Six Counties is still largely frowned upon. (And I could add a bit more there, and probably will if the thread develops.)

I then recalled that in October 1920 Clem Attlee, as Mayor of Stepney, had donned his full municipal robe and regalia to walk behind the coffin of Terence MacSwiney. That's when I went looking for the newsreel clip (as at the top of this post) on Youtube.

@djmgaffneyw4 was wondering, as I did, who was the bespectacled lead pall-bearer? It looks very much like Dev ...

Your starter for ten:

Who is he?

Because I was reckoning on Dev being in the US at that time.
 


former wesleyan

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It'll be in the newspaper archives surely ?
 

Boy M5

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It's not Dev. Too stocky and not tall enough.
Maybe it's his brother the priest. But I suspect he was in Amerikay with his brother.
The bishop was Archbishop Peter Amigo of Southwark. A pretty brave man. He ensured Terence McSwiney had a proper funeral and set up secondary schools in his archdiocese - at a time Catholics were seen by some as disloyal or suspect - a bit like Muslims in UK today.
His Cathedral was built on the site of the Gordon Riots.
 

Boy M5

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I suspect someone from London GAA-IRB-Gaelic League circles.
But he was back in Cork.
So probably not.
Did you see the priest and the adult altar server pushing each other in front of the coffin in Southwark?

Atlee was Major Atlee - so like Peter Amigo was an act of bravery and respect.
 

Herr Rommel

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Here's a small problem:

[video=youtube;qU16rhRHP7M]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qU16rhRHP7M[/video]

Aha! You've already spotted it! So help me here ...

The story so far:

It began with a twitter exchange between @djmgaffneyw4 and myself.

@djmgaffneyw4 kicked off:


My somewhat tedious interruption was to agree: Corbyn was being honourably reticent in his argument. Then, as so often, I suffered a small brain-stutter. And that led me elsewhere ...

After all, the Labour Manifesto of 1918 was definitive:

As far as I know, the Party has never greatly resiled from that position. Which is why, among other reasons, initiating Labour Party operations in the Six Counties is still largely frowned upon. (And I could add a bit more there, and probably will if the thread develops.)

I then recalled that in October 1920 Clem Attlee, as Mayor of Stepney, had donned his full municipal robe and regalia to walk behind the coffin of Terence MacSwiney. That's when I went looking for the newsreel clip (as at the top of this post) on Youtube.

@djmgaffneyw4 was wondering, as I did, who was the bespectacled lead pall-bearer? It looks very much like Dev ...

Your starter for ten:

Who is he?

Because I was reckoning on Dev being in the US at that time.
I just sent you a pm with some information on this and will check out if I can get anything else from other family members.
 

Malcolm Redfellow

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But he was back in Cork.
So probably not.
Did you see the priest and the adult altar server pushing each other in front of the coffin in Southwark?

Atlee was Major Atlee - so like Peter Amigo was an act of bravery and respect.
But the look of it, Bishop Amigo (a Gibraltarian, thus explaining the surname) had considerable support in the streets of London.

I've seen an account of Prime Minister Attlee making an 'unofficial' visit to the Border, while on holiday in August 1948. The story goes he was reckless of any danger — but that would have been mainly because of wife Violet's driving.

Clem was a strong, determined man. At Gallipoli, Captain Attlee's company was the rear-guard for the evacuation, and he was last-but-one to embark off the beach at Suvla Bay. He then served (and was badly wounded) in the Mesopotamian campaign, and for the last few months of the War on the Western Front (again injured).

One thought about his sympathy for MacSwiney: Attlee's brother, Tom, was a sincere member of the Christian Social Union, and spent January 1917 to the end of the War in Wormwood Scrubs as a conscientious objector.
 
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What the Fug

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I've seen an account of Prime Minister Attlee making an 'unofficial' visit to the Border, while on holiday in August 1948. The story goes he was reckless of any danger — but that would have been mainly because of wife Violet's driving.

.
My understanding is he was on a driving holiday of Southern Ireland(Sligo by all accounts), John Cole first big story was interviewing him when he crossed back to the north
 


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