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Why does the Turkish government hate the Kurds?

davidcameron

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The world should condemn Turkey for its incursion into Syria - Independent.ie

Harry Charalambou wrote:

Turkey's President Erdogan has used the West's fear of Isil as an excuse to try to clear border areas of Kurdish occupation, knowing that our self-seeking acceptance of Kissinger Realpolitik to protect ourselves means that no one will object to another Turkish attempt to rid itself of yet another ethnic group.
Is the Turkish government intending to commit genocide against the Kurds in Syria?

Surely, the Kurdish-populated areas in Turkey's border region constitute only a small part of Turkey. So why does Turkey have a problem with the idea of the Kurds having their own state?

Where is this hatred of the Kurds coming from?
 


Spanner Island

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The world should condemn Turkey for its incursion into Syria - Independent.ie

Harry Charalambou wrote:



Is the Turkish government intending to commit genocide against the Kurds in Syria?

Surely, the Kurdish-populated areas in Turkey's border region constitute only a small part of Turkey. So why does Turkey have a problem with the idea of the Kurds having their own state?

Where is this hatred of the Kurds coming from?
Dunno myself... I'm sure the answer is available on Google or Bing...

The Kurds seem to be ok though... from what I know of them... (which is very little)... the most stable part of Iraq throughout the last decade has been the Kurdish area... and they don't seem to be fundamentalist nut jobs either...
 

Dame_Enda

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The Kurds were half promised a state by the Allies in the Treaty of Sevres but it was vague and the idea was abandoned after the Turkish War of Independence ousted the Allied Occupation of Turkey in the 1920s.
 

davidcameron

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The Kurds were half promised a state by the Allies in the Treaty of Sevres but it was vague and the idea was abandoned after the Turkish War of Independence ousted the Allied Occupation of Turkey in the 1920s.
How did Ataturk defeat the forces of Britain, France, Italy and Greece? How did four major powers lose a war against him?
 

wombat

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I don't think they hate them, they just don't think they have a right to separate.
 

gerhard dengler

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How did Ataturk defeat the forces of Britain, France, Italy and Greece? How did four major powers lose a war against him?
War fatigue?

Regarding the OP, I know little or nothing about the history of the Kurds except that they have sought their own independent state.
It would appear that that state would be located in Northern Iraq.

The question though is very interesting : why is every group in that region opposed to the Kurds?
 

wombat

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The question though is very interesting : why is every group in that region opposed to the Kurds?
They all want to maintain their current borders, its not clear that all Kurds want a single independent state or that such a state would be viable.
 

davidcameron

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They all want to maintain their current borders, its not clear that all Kurds want a single independent state or that such a state would be viable.
But Kurdish-inhabited areas constitute only a small part of Turkey on the border with Syria. Why is the Turkish government bothered by that?
 

gerhard dengler

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They all want to maintain their current borders, its not clear that all Kurds want a single independent state or that such a state would be viable.
These are the same borders drawn initially by the cartographers from the Allied Powers after WW1, at the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire.
 

wombat

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These are the same borders drawn initially by the cartographers from the Allied Powers after WW1, at the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire.
A Turkish guy who worked in Iraq told me he never met an Iraqi - he meant that it is a completely artificial collection of people with nothing in common.
 

wombat

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But Kurdish-inhabited areas constitute only a small part of Turkey on the border with Syria. Why is the Turkish government bothered by that?
Nationalism? why do the Spanish govt worry about the Basques?
 

Dame_Enda

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I read that before the AKP lost their majority in the first of two recent General Elections, some senior AKP figures were saying they would be okay with a Kurdish state in Northern Iraq. But when the AKP lost their majority they decided to restart the conflict in order to gain nationalist votes.
 

PlanetBertie

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The Kurds would have control of water that flows into Turkey, they are worried that this precious commodity could be jeopardise, or they could be the usual ************************z who want freedom for themselves and no one else.
 

eoghanacht

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Sykes-Picot has a lot of blood at its door.
 

wombat

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The Kurdish-inhabited part of Turkey is proportionally much smaller in Turkey than the Basque region or Catalonia.
So what? the Turks want to keep it part of Turkey. Not all Turkish Kurds want to separate - a few years ago the Kurdish candidate for president was the best option for Turks opposed to Erdogan. I heard an interview during the week with some Kurds living in Ireland and they were saying it would be very difficult to form a unified Kurdish state from the various Kurdish territories.
Back to Erdogan - he reminds me of a Turkish Charlie Haughey - wave the nationalist or religious flag as circumstances demand.
 

Ardillaun

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For the usual reasons. People get hung up on borders, start to see something sacred in them, something ordained from above, and to regard secession as heresy. Ditto Kashmir, Ukraine, Russia, China etc. Most Anatolians are not ethnic Turks which adds to the insecurity of a former imperial power.
 

Ireniall

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But Kurdish-inhabited areas constitute only a small part of Turkey on the border with Syria. Why is the Turkish government bothered by that?
The potential Kurdish area of Turkey is huge.
 
Last edited:

Hewson

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A Turkish guy who worked in Iraq told me he never met an Iraqi - he meant that it is a completely artificial collection of people with nothing in common.
And so it is, as the current conflict plainly indicates. Iraq's population has three principle components: Sunni Muslims, Shia Muslims and the more secular Kurds to the north. Kurdistan is estimated to hold up to one third of Iraq's oil reserves, totaling some 45 billion barrels. Gas reserves in Kurdistan are sufficient to meet Turkish demand for decades to come and the two sides signed a 50 year agreement in 2015 to supply both oil and gas through a pipeline to Turkey.

The Kurds' dream of their own homeland (they're the largest ethnic group on earth without their own country) would encompass parts of Syria, Iran and Turkey, along with the Kurdistan region itself. That's where the problem arises for the Turks, always fearful of secession in their south-eastern, Kurdish-dominated region. The Marxist PKK has been waging a guerilla war there for thirty years and a peace deal brokered in 2014 collapsed last year. Kurdistan politics is dominated by a few tribal families, the Barzanis being the most powerful. While the rest of Iraq is a basket case when it comes to corruption Kurdistan is somewhat more open, but corruption, particularly within the MNR (Ministry of Natural Resources) headed by Ashti Hawrami (a UK citizen) is rife. The Kurdish government and the PKK see eye to eye on very little and the Turks' assault on PKK bases rarely raises an eyebrow in Erbil.

The mess that is Syria is typified by the Turkish crackdown on the YPG (People's Protection Units), one of America's main allies in the war on Daesh. Turkey is an important US ally, a NATO member and a serious threat to regional stability as long as the Islamofascist, Erdogan, is alive and issuing vendettas against anyone or anything he perceives as a threat to his leadership.

As always, the Turks are not to be trusted. But then, just about nobody in that sorry part of the world is.
 


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