Why Dublin city council should be deprived of powers of planning permissions for housing if it continues to listen to NIMBY councillors

Patslatt1

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Why Dublin city council should be deprived of powers of planning permissions for housing if it continues to listen to NIMBY councillors

When asked by Dublin Gazette if they would support development of the city's underused green spaces,most of Dublin's city councillors evaded the question or spoke about minor tweaks to the housing supply. See https://dublingazette.com/news/well-oppose-plans-build-underused-green-space/

With over 500,000 population, about a ninth of Ireland's total, Dublin probably needs at least 5,000 housing starts a year relative to the overall Irish housing starts needed of about 30,000 a year, given that economic growth is concentrated in Dublin.

Going by the NIMBY attitude of most Dublin councillors who depend heavily on the votes of NIMBY home owners, these houses won't be built. However, Owen Keegen,manager of the council, wants development on underused green spaces and may take the councillors' opinions ,which could be hypocritical, with a grain of salt.

But if Keegan can't or won't use his power to order a rezoning of those sites, the city council should be deprived of powers of planning permissions which should be transferred to the Department of the Environment in the national interest. Local planners could be kept in place for local input,however.

All over Dublin there are massive golf courses which could house hundreds of thousands. Is golf more important in our democracy than providing housing at prices the majority can afford? Buying an average house means a lifetime of mortgage slavery for the average income Dublin couple if they qualify for a mortgage at all.
 


D

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Probably quite a lot of church owned underused green spaces too, Pat.
 

tipofdiceberg

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When asked by Dublin Gazette if they would support development of the city's underused green spaces,most of Dublin's city councillors evaded the question or spoke about minor tweaks to the housing supply. See https://dublingazette.com/news/well-oppose-plans-build-underused-green-space/

With over 500,000 population, about a ninth of Ireland's total, Dublin probably needs at least 5,000 housing starts a year relative to the overall Irish housing starts needed of about 30,000 a year, given that economic growth is concentrated in Dublin.

Going by the NIMBY attitude of most Dublin councillors who depend heavily on the votes of NIMBY home owners, these houses won't be built. However, Owen Keegen,manager of the council, wants development on underused green spaces and may take the councillors' opinions ,which could be hypocritical, with a grain of salt.

But if Keegan can't or won't use his power to order a rezoning of those sites, the city council should be deprived of powers of planning permissions which should be transferred to the Department of the Environment in the national interest. Local planners could be kept in place for local input,however.

All over Dublin there are massive golf courses which could house hundreds of thousands. Is golf more important in our democracy than providing housing at prices the majority can afford? Buying an average house means a lifetime of mortgage slavery for the average income Dublin couple if they qualify for a mortgage at all.
No reply.
Or
The FFG government are the estate agents. They set the agenda.
 

Congalltee

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The OP wants to rezone golf courses.
What if the golfers want a course rather than a dividend.
Will you CPD the land?

Also what’s with this 5000 year estimated supply need for Dublin. Use real numbers.
 

Patslatt1

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The OP wants to rezone golf courses.
What if the golfers want a course rather than a dividend.
Will you CPD the land?

Also what’s with this 5000 year estimated supply need for Dublin. Use real numbers.
Media sources quote about 30,000 housing starts a year as necessary for Ireland. With Dublin City's population a bit above 500,000, this suggests Dublin should at least have one ninth of these starts or 3,333 based on its share of Ireland's population of 4.5 millions. But given that Ireland's economic growth is concentrated in Dublin, a far higher figure than 3,333 is justified.
 

The_SR

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I live in Dublin. I like having green space. Am I a nimby?
 

hammer

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The chap from the Housing Agency had a good article in the SBP.

He is blaming construction sector and homeless agency sector for overstating the crisis.

Supposedly there are 60+ charities involved in the sector employing over 900.

Supposedly also they get substantial funds from the exchequer.

Does anyone have access to the article online ?
 

Congalltee

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Media sources quote about 30,000 housing starts a year as necessary for Ireland. With Dublin City's population a bit above 500,000, this suggests Dublin should at least have one ninth of these starts or 3,333 based on its share of Ireland's population of 4.5 millions. But given that Ireland's economic growth is concentrated in Dublin, a far higher figure than 3,333 is justified.
Please reassure me you don’t work for DCC, DLRC, DS or Fingal or Dept. of Environment.
Dublin City region has a current shortfall of 35,242 properties, 6.3k minimum requirement for 2017 and an average of 7k until 2020.
 

hollandia

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The OP wants to rezone golf courses.
What if the golfers want a course rather than a dividend.
Will you CPD the land?

Also what’s with this 5000 year estimated supply need for Dublin. Use real numbers.
47% (37,581 units) of total supply over the 5 year period is required across the Dublin
Region’s urban settlements, as defined in the table below. The figures show there
is an immediate supply requirement of 5,663 units in 2014, which rises to a per
annum requirement of 8,970 units in 2018. Notably, requirements are not confined
to the defined Dublin City and Suburbs area. There is a marked requirement for
units in areas such as Swords (1,448 units between 2014-2018) and Balbriggan (925
units between 2014-2018). The research also projects the potential household
composition of future requirements. It shows that 57%7 of all households in the
Dublin Region will be for one and two person households, while three person
households account for a further 18%. Therefore, three quarters of all households
over this period will be for three people or less.
Are these real enough for you?

https://www.housingagency.ie/Housing/media/Media/Publications/Future-Housing-Supply-Requirements-Report.pdf
 

Roll_On

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There is no need to go after parks. The problem isn't lack of space, it's that government and local policy is designed to make housing expensive by frustrating the process as much as possible:

DCC doesn't want this hotel, because 9 floors is too high in Central Dublin (imagine that in the centre of European capital). Also a 300 year old building which was once an example of Dutch Billy (but was destroyed in the Georgian era and now has no architectural merit or indeed practical function must be 'preserved' i.e. left to rot).

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/concerns-over-plans-for-nine-storey-budget-hotel-in-dublin-1.3273454

DCC, in contravention of it's OWN local area plan, refused permission for this hotel:

https://www.independent.ie/business/commercial-property/tara-street-tower-appeal-to-be-public-36237841.html

in spite of a building of same scale being proposed in the LAP and after the developer had as many as 13 meetings with DCC to agree a suitable design. This is now going to oral hearing, at great expense to the developer.

These are just 2 examples of how DCC actively deters development on derelict or under utilized sites in the city that are badly needed.

Then take into account that DCC infact OWNS 88 derelict sites within it's jurisdiction.

It's clear there is deliberate policy here. Housing, hotel rooms and office space are to be kept in scarce a supply as possible, no doubt that benefits all the right people. Just look at Dublin office rents, which are second only to London in Europe, and aren't that far behind the likes of New York and Singapore.
 

Dermot Lacey

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Dear Editor,

I think I was the only City Councillor present to hear the Dublin City Council Chief Executive speak at the recent Urban Land Institute Conference. Perhaps that is why I have not been one of those to respond negatively.

I did not hear him propose "building on our Parks or rezoning "real green spaces or recreational areas". I did hear him say there was a case for "revisting" some of the green zoned lands that do not offer significant amenity value. I agree. I do so from experience.

This week in the very estate in which I live work started on nineteen new social homes. This will be in addition to the nine affordable homes and the six additional social housing units that we found space for in this small estate over the last few years. These were on "green spaces" that had "no amenity value". In fact two of the sites had been permanently locked since the estate was built over fifty years ago. It is also worth noting that twenty eight of these homes will have been developed by Voluntary Housing Bodies and six by the City Council. All on what might be called "left over" "Green" or Council lands.

If we are to resolve our Housing crisis we must be imaginative, innovative and open to new ideas. Yes of course we must protect local amentity and open spaces ..but we also must provide shelter and homes for those in need.

Incidentally the suggestion contained elsewhere in the media that the Chairperson of the Housing Agency was not challenged on his absurd claim at the same Conference "that there was no housing crisis" is wrong. He was ..by me.
.

Yours sincerely,

Councillor Dermot Lacey
 

GDPR

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Dear Editor,

I think I was the only City Councillor present to hear the Dublin City Council Chief Executive speak at the recent Urban Land Institute Conference. Perhaps that is why I have not been one of those to respond negatively.

I did not hear him propose "building on our Parks or rezoning "real green spaces or recreational areas". I did hear him say there was a case for "revisting" some of the green zoned lands that do not offer significant amenity value. I agree. I do so from experience.

This week in the very estate in which I live work started on nineteen new social homes. This will be in addition to the nine affordable homes and the six additional social housing units that we found space for in this small estate over the last few years. These were on "green spaces" that had "no amenity value". In fact two of the sites had been permanently locked since the estate was built over fifty years ago. It is also worth noting that twenty eight of these homes will have been developed by Voluntary Housing Bodies and six by the City Council. All on what might be called "left over" "Green" or Council lands.

If we are to resolve our Housing crisis we must be imaginative, innovative and open to new ideas. Yes of course we must protect local amentity and open spaces ..but we also must provide shelter and homes for those in need.

Incidentally the suggestion contained elsewhere in the media that the Chairperson of the Housing Agency was not challenged on his absurd claim at the same Conference "that there was no housing crisis" is wrong. He was ..by me.
.

Yours sincerely,

Councillor Dermot Lacey
Thanks for the clarification and the examples you give, makes sense now.

Sent from my SM-A320FL using Tapatalk
 

Voluntary

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Every single new house built in the city of Dublin is contributing to the housing affordability problem. The land taken by 1 house could provide 20,30 maybe even more apartments.
 

Patslatt1

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I live in Dublin. I like having green space. Am I a nimby?
NIMBYS oppose all housing that interferes with the view. In aeroplane flights over Dublin, it's obvious there are vast green spaces, even farms within the M50, yet a housing crisis has developed.
 

Patslatt1

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Nov 18, 2009
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The chap from the Housing Agency had a good article in the SBP.

He is blaming construction sector and homeless agency sector for overstating the crisis.

Supposedly there are 60+ charities involved in the sector employing over 900.

Supposedly also they get substantial funds from the exchequer.

Does anyone have access to the article online ?
The charities should get together on how to use cheap night vision cameras to identify criminals who are committing thefts in hostels and making homeless people afraid to use them.
 


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