Why Hasn't There Been Another Revolution in Ireland

General Urko

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Taking roughly 1912-1923 as the first revolutionary period, why given factors such as huge disparities in life outcomes depending on social class, inequalities in incomes and traditional huge levels of unemployment, why was there never a second revolution?

Emmigration as a safety valve, a national love of bullshíters over doers, a half decent social welfare system developed over time, a largely redkneck population taught to know there place are some obvious factors, have I missed any?

Gay Byrne was fond of quoting our current Minister for FA's father Oliver J as saying during the 80s, the country was never as ripe for a coup.
 


GDPR

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Emigration I meant- don't know why I cannot edit that post.

Also look at Amster who sucks up his class outright enemies as opposed to others because "ah sure aren't we all just individuals and aren't we all just Irish".
 

Catalpast

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We have had any number of revolutions in Ireland esp since 1960

- when Modern Ireland basically took off
 

General Urko

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We have had any number of revolutions in Ireland esp since 1960

- when Modern Ireland basically took off
Can you really have a revolution that doesn't draw blood?
 

General Urko

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The safety valve of easy immigration to England.
Interestingly, The Irish abroad, usually supported the perceived more radical parties in their adopted lands - Northern Democrats in The States, The Liberals in Canada, Labour in The UK and Austalia and theyw ere very prominent in real trade union movements in the latter 2 countries as well!
 

GDPR

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Interestingly, The Irish abroad, usually supported the perceived more radical parties in their adopted lands - Northern Democrats in The States, The Liberals in Canada, Labour in The UK and Austalia and theyw ere very prominent in real trade union movements in the latter 2 countries as well!
During the Troubles Irish Priests tend in England tended to be not only much more ascetic than the flabby ones at home but also tended to sympathize with the Provies a lot more than those back in Galway or Dublin who in general tended towards Fine Gael. Well yes obviously the Bishops moving out "trouble makers" however to this day you will find that Irish and Hiberno-English are massively over represented on both the Radical Left and Right in England while the ROI doesn't really have much at all of Radical Left or Right so maybe there is something deeper going on.
 

statsman

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Can you really have a revolution that doesn't draw blood?
Yes.

Do you have a bit of an obsession with violence? Maybe lay off the auld PlayStation for a while.
 

Aindriu

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Can you really have a revolution that doesn't draw blood?
Yes. The Czech Velvet revolution when they broke the Soviet chains at the end of the Cold War. Not a single shot fired.
 

GDPR

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We have had any number of revolutions in Ireland esp since 1960

- when Modern Ireland basically took off
They weren't so much "Revolutions" as things that happened from the top down in response to the changing needs of Irish Capitalism. It is interesting that the full on assault on what remained of the Gaelic Christendom really began in earnest in the 1990s with the ending of the Cold War. Prior to that people like Emily's family found Catholicism useful, though of course they didn't have the Faith at all, as a bulwark against Communism.
 

farnaby

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For all our mismanagement we're a first world country and the threat of starvation - a key ingredient in many revolutions - has thankfully been absent in the past century.

Also, post-20s economic difficulties could perhaps be seen as a result of revolution (independence), meaning even those in poverty would not see revolution as the way to improve their lot.
 

Levellers

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I think the massive injection of EU (or EEC) cash from the 1970s onwards helped towards halting revolution.
 

gerhard dengler

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Taking roughly 1912-1923 as the first revolutionary period, why given factors such as huge disparities in life outcomes depending on social class, inequalities in incomes and traditional huge levels of unemployment, why was there never a second revolution?

Emmigration as a safety valve, a national love of bullshíters over doers, a half decent social welfare system developed over time, a largely redkneck population taught to know there place are some obvious factors, have I missed any?

Gay Byrne was fond of quoting our current Minister for FA's father Oliver J as saying during the 80s, the country was never as ripe for a coup.
Revolution is probably an act carried out by a desperate people.

For all of it's faults, and there are many for sure, Ireland has remained as a pretty good country to live in - even today.
 
D

Deleted member 45466

Can you really have a revolution that doesn't draw blood?
The sexual revolution? Counter culture revolution? No blood letting, lots of other kinds of letting. Good way of controlling the masses (according to Huxley anyway).

I think myself that one of the great legacies of British rule in Ireland was a large PS/CS. Give about 25 - 30% of the population jobs in the state sector, and quelling dissidence is a fairly straightforward matter.

The Brits were very smart.
 
D

Deleted member 45466

Revolution is probably an act carried out by a desperate people.

For all of it's faults, and there are many for sure, Ireland has remained as a pretty good country to live in - even today.
But, but, what about the Catholic reign of terror, genocide etc. etc.?
 

*EPIC SUCCESS*

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There has been a slow revolution in terms of pretty much every aspect of Irish life, from how we work, socialize, travel, holiday and even how we eat and view our food.

What there has not been is a revolution of the mind to realise that we will never have true change so long as we keep making 'safe' political choices in voting FFG or Lab.

Sadly however, this is understandable as in the real world the alternatives are hardly much better - their rhetoric is attractive but their reality is almost as bad.
 
D

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I think the massive injection of EU (or EEC) cash from the 1970s onwards helped towards halting revolution.
Debt slaves are far too busy slaving all day every day to pay off crippling debts to have the necessary time or energy left to spend on forming any kind of revolutionary consciousness. The system is set up that way.

The welfare system coupled with this ensures nobody ever gets hungry and angry enough to pour out on to the streets to usurp our corrupt "leaders" (a.k.a service providers for big money, corporates and a few "special" citizens)

Bertrand touches on some interesting points here:

[video=youtube;9Lfb8mlIe9I]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Lfb8mlIe9I[/video]

Also, modern technology means people's little remaining time is pulled in increasingly many directions to distract them. And of course the bath of propaganda we are daily immersed in thanks to that same technology and the control of media outlets by a small minority of vested interests crushes any sparks that might remain of people thinking for themselves.
 

TedHankey

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Taking roughly 1912-1923 as the first revolutionary period, why given factors such as huge disparities in life outcomes depending on social class, inequalities in incomes and traditional huge levels of unemployment, why was there never a second revolution?

Emmigration as a safety valve, a national love of bullshíters over doers, a half decent social welfare system developed over time, a largely redkneck population taught to know there place are some obvious factors, have I missed any?

Gay Byrne was fond of quoting our current Minister for FA's father Oliver J as saying during the 80s, the country was never as ripe for a coup.
If you look close enough you'll find that in fact, i'm alright jack.
 

GDPR

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Nearly 40 years of a serious level of violence in NI might have had some impact too, Southie boys.

But of course partition runs so deep in your little hearts and souls, you forgot that bit petunia
 


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