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Why I no longer trust the EU on the backstop


McSlaggart

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Dec 29, 2010
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Does this evaluation seem reasonable to you? Not to me. Given that motorway toll systems can identify and track down cars that have not paid a toll, it would seem plausible that border control system could identify and track down trucks that have not filled in an electronic declaration. Given that milk can be tracked from individual cows to the end consumer (https://www.nedap-livestockmanagement.com/dairy-farming/solutions/cow-identification/) it would seem plausible that it would be not too onerous to track individual van and truck loads.
Sweet holy feck. If you want some facts read the link.

'Planning is a nightmare': Irish milk firm fears 'lights out' after Brexit | Politics | The Guardian
 

CookieMonster

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Feb 19, 2005
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No - the EU will require the ROI to have a hard border.
Which would not happen if the UK hasn't opted to leave the EU and burn every bridge they could find.


When has the UK said that there has to be a hard border?
It is the consequence of the action they took.


You're not going to win this one. This is all on the UK.
 

CookieMonster

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On that point, it is not a high priority news item in many countries in the Continent. However, practically every item I've seen on French news mentions the border.
It isn't even a high priority at the Commission. It's discussed at the meeting where it is required but nowhere else. They've moved on. When it does come up it is greeted with a regrettable shrug of the shoulders and that's about it.
 

SideysGhost

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Nov 30, 2009
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And none of that speaks to the anger it would raise; to the sense of the abandonment of years of progress - by two governments (we can safely, of course, leave the Assembly out, which in retrospect may have been wise to go into hibernation for the time being) . The last point is only partly cynical. Sinn Féin have their policy on abstentionism. I understand the historical underpinnings of it. Maybe they should attempt to revive the Assembly, or at least be seen to try. The points causing in shut down can be shelved for the moment. It is an utter disgrace that between the parties of NI, they refuse to represent the entirety of the place during events such as these.
The DUP don't want Stormont back precisely for the reasons you allude to, they are absolutely terrified of having to be in a position of public official responsibility and accounability for the Brexit disaster.

SF (and the SDLP) aren't fussed because their voters have told them in no uncertain terms that the nationalist electorate will only accept a restored Stormont now under very strict and specific conditions that involve a lot of checks and balances on DUP sectarianism and criminality. And that they don't give a flying one about the optics in London, which everyone sees as being on the way out the door soon anyway (whether they like it or not).
 

SideysGhost

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Regrettably I think this thread has shown that is not a reasonable or rational assumption to make. Some posters really don't care about facts and will outright reject those that do not make them fuzzy in the Feels.

It's a form of infantilism IMO, some sort of interrupt in the normal psychological development towards adulthood. But as we have seen in multiple countries, it actually seems to affect about a third of any given population :cry2:
 

Beachcomber

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Nov 11, 2010
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Which would not happen if the UK hasn't opted to leave the EU and burn every bridge they could find.



It is the consequence of the action they took.


You're not going to win this one. This is all on the UK.

But the UK has voted to leave the EU.

You need to face that reality.
 

bang bang

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Jul 11, 2010
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1,085
The original backstop meant that NI would effectvely remain in the EU when the rest of the UK left.
There is no "current backstop" that is any different to the original one.

At one stage May suggested neutering the backstop by extending it to the whole UK, but that was not acceptable to Brexiteers, because then the whole UK would not be leaving.

The Polish foreign minister has suggested neutering the backstop by putting a 5 year time limit on it.
That will probably be May's focus for the next week or two. Not that she hadn't already thought of it (Coveney has already rejected that idea several times) Its just that there is no other option left now, other than a hard no-deal Brexit.
The Irish side refuses to talk to the British side.
The Poles can't understand why the Irish are pursuing this suicidal course.
In the end, Juncker will decide all.
The Poles currently have their own issues with the EU and couldn't care less about Ireland and the backstop. They are playing a different game.
 

cranberry1

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Jul 9, 2018
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The Poles currently have their own issues with the EU and couldn't care less about Ireland and the backstop. They are playing a different game.
The Poles have a much closer relationship with the Brits than the Irish do , they have ever since WW2 my uncle mike was from Poland , he married my fathers sister , they lived in Leeds , he was a great character and had some Great War stories .....anyhow I'm not surprised that the Poles are backing the brits .
 

Beachcomber

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The Poles have a much closer relationship with the Brits than the Irish do , they have ever since WW2 my uncle mike was from Poland , he married my fathers sister , they lived in Leeds , he was a great character and had some Great War stories .....anyhow I'm not surprised that the Poles are backing the brits .
Me either.

The Irish state did nothing to help the Poles during WW2.
 

Prof Honeydew

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Sep 17, 2010
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The Poles have a much closer relationship with the Brits than the Irish do , they have ever since WW2 my uncle mike was from Poland , he married my fathers sister , they lived in Leeds , he was a great character and had some Great War stories .....anyhow I'm not surprised that the Poles are backing the brits .
Yup. The Poles loved the way the Brits stood up for them in 1939. Chamberlain's strongly worded letter to Hitler was an act of incomparable bravery. As was Churchill defending Poland against Stalin in Yalta and repatriating Polish prisoners so that they could be re-educated into accepting the Soviet-imposed People's Republic.

In fact, what the Poles really admire is the way the Brits always keep their word.
 

flavirostris

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Dec 21, 2007
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Yup. The Poles loved the way the Brits stood up for them in 1939. Chamberlain's strongly worded letter to Hitler was an act of incomparable bravery. As was Churchill defending Poland against Stalin in Yalta and repatriating Polish prisoners so that they could be re-educated into accepting the Soviet-imposed People's Republic.

In fact, what the Poles really admire is the way the Brits always keep their word.
The Brits did stand up for them in 39. They declared war on Germany.
 
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