Why should emigrants return?

Jack O Neill

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When was that? I was told quite categorically that my UK NI payments did not count towards benefits / pensions here by the DSP in 2009.[/QUOTe

the new rules in state pension only apply from 2019 i think , that will catch a lot of returning non Eu emigrants out as they will have a gap they can never recover
 


LineInTheSand

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Not on our lives are we returning. We've done it twice and on both occasions when we returned we regretted the decision.

Naivety was our downfall, wrongly believing things will change in Ireland.
They didn't and they will not.

We've a fairly broad circle off friends, some married with children, some married but thinking of starting a family. All of us have done the rotation back to Ireland thinking it will be better, sadly it was diabolical.

Now we collectively enjoy terrific careers with very comfortable lifestyles and none of the stresses that dogged us when we resided in Ireland being squeezed along with all the other middle class workers..

Na, ye can keep the Irish pipedream - it's empty.
You've contributed nothing to Ireland while abroad, socially, politically, economically but expected the little worker bees at home to be readying things for your return? Ireland would have been better off with our emigrants at home and on the dole than have them leave forever.
 

Jack O Neill

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You've contributed nothing to Ireland while abroad, socially, politically, economically but expected the little worker bees at home to be readying things for your return? Ireland would have been better off with our emigrants at home and on the dole than have them leave forever.
at least 500, 000 left between 2007 and 2012 , we would have had unemployment rates approaching 30+ % , we would have been better off all :roll:right
 

Blokesbloke

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So they can vote Enda Kenny out?
 

amsterdemmetje

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I certainly didn't find that to be the case, at all.
Ive been lucky i've never really had to deal with that scenario (although we did go hell trying to secure Domiciliary Care for our son) when i came back but i talked to those who have been away on shorter terms than me and they have been treated disgracefully, especially with this particular meltdown in the economy..
 

amsterdemmetje

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You've contributed nothing to Ireland while abroad, socially, politically, economically but expected the little worker bees at home to be readying things for your return? Ireland would have been better of with our emigrants at home and on the dole than have them leave forever.
I dont know what age you are but i left in the late 80s along with nearly all my siblings and cousins and neighbours .We didnt leave for the fun of it ,there was nothing, absolutely nothing here ,unless you were connected to those with skin in the game. Some of us were even given money for the ferry to leave by Community Welfare Officers, i lived in a house in South London with 12 guys from the same village ffs at one stage. Id say you might be a son/daughter of those i spoke of with skin in the game, either that or you have completely white washed the devastation of the 8Os out of your head or some one did it for you.
 

freewillie

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The 80s were an absolute disaster in Ireland. High interest rates, high unemployment and Emigration.
Near civil war in the North And Provos bombing London etc on a regular basis making life very tough for any of us working in the UK. Anyone who suggests people should have stayed at home on the dole is a fool
 

hollandia

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When was that? I was told quite categorically that my UK NI payments did not count towards benefits / pensions here by the DSP in 2009.
That was 2008. They have to be physically transferred. DSP are wrong in this regard.
 

LineInTheSand

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I dont know what age you are but i left in the late 80s along with nearly all my siblings and cousins and neighbours .We didnt leave for the fun of it ,there was nothing, absolutely nothing here ,unless you were connected to those with skin in the game. Some of us were even given money for the ferry to leave by Community Welfare Officers, i lived in a house in South London with 12 guys from the same village ffs at one stage. Id say you might be a son/daughter of those i spoke of with skin in the game, either that or you have completely white washed the devastation of the 8Os out of your head or some one did it for you.
Don't know how you deduce any of this from my contribution but you're just wrong on nearly every count. Anyway good luck to all our emigrants, I hope you'll come back and improve Ireland some day, we could do with it.
 

Eire1976

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So they can vote Enda Kenny out?
Enda is smart, he saw that there was a lot of young uns coming out of universities who wouldn't put up with his sh1te for too much more and he got rid of them abroad, just like Haughey did in the 80's.
 

LineInTheSand

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at least 500, 000 left between 2007 and 2012 , we would have had unemployment rates approaching 30+ % , we would have been better off all :roll:right
Can you give me the link to the figures that show net emigration of 500,000 Irish in 5 years?
 

farnaby

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I'm a returned emigrant after most of my growing up being in London, which I love to visit, hate to live in. Myself and missus much prefer Dublin to London despite the undeniable frustrations of Irish life (including first time house-buying during the bubble).

The interesting aspect of my situation is that I have been able to avail of international job opportunities while being based in Ireland. I've worked in multiple roles for two different companies with a negligible proportion of these roles having anything to do with Ireland.

Therefore I'm a pure export - all my salary comes from abroad. And I've met many like me, working from home and travelling around the world every few weeks.

Point being - with technology and travel, home location has become less important and opportunities have opened up for those based here (there or everywhere).

People emigrate for opportunity or a better quality of life. I say there's opportunity to be had if you're Ireland-based. The quality of life differential - which is hugely unequal and not merit-based - is the main reason for emigrants not to return and the thing we need to sort out.
 

hollandia

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Can you give me the link to the figures that show net emigration of 500,000 Irish in 5 years?
Emmigration

80,900 Apr 2014-2015
Population and Migration Estimates April 2015 - CSO - Central Statistics Office

You know full well that he did not say that there was a net loss of 500,000 people between 2007-2012. He said 500,000 had left. This "debate" will go much better if everyone sticks to the facts. That means not pushing an agenda. And that means you as well.

The figure from the graph (at an estimate) is around 380,000 people leaving during the period stated. The trend line shows that we have had a net loss of population over the last seven years or so. Those are the facts as we know them.
 

dizillusioned

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Don't know how you deduce any of this from my contribution but you're just wrong on nearly every count. Anyway good luck to all our emigrants, I hope you'll come back and improve Ireland some day, we could do with it.


why would / should any returning emigrant improve Ireland? It is not their place to do that. I, like many, have left and come back and left again. It is my home but does not feel like home anymore. Once my parents are gone, I suspect it will never be home again. I love my family and friends, but have never been able to make a living in Ireland. It is no longer my focus of life. I love being there but the reality is, it is too small, too insular for me to do what I need to do to make a living. Yes I have a presence there, in reality that is more to do with it being my home. It is not paramount for me anymore to improve Ireland, that should be the purpose of those living IN ireland.

As as someone who has lived in many countries, has been called upon to "invest" in Ireland, never again! I shall invest in me and mine. If I5ish emigrants have no say in Ireland, why should they be called upon to improve it?
 

beazlebottom

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In December 2015, An Taoiseach, Enda Kenny, in his Christmas address called on emigrants to come home. Pretty standard fare you might say, up there with "we pray fervently for the reintegration of the National Territory" of days gone by - a sort of piety uttered without consequence, typical of the platitudes of career politicians.

Taoiseach's Christmas Message - MerrionStreet

However, I stumbled upon the following article in the IT, in which a recent emigrant is thoroughly offended by the notion, even suggesting that they were advised to leave by public servants in 2008.

When Ireland called emigrants

As someone, who along with quite a number of Piesters have in the past felt compelled to emigrate, either through choice or through sheer lack of opportunity at home, the timbre of the interviewee resonated quite sharply with me. I was quite lucky, in that my stints abroad were relatively short - a year here, two years there - and I was able to return fairly quickly once opportunities at home arose.

I sense however, the interviewee is symptomatic of the bulk of recent emigrés, in that the last financial collapse was so spectacular, and the drain of people out of the country so sharp, that they have absolutely no intention to return at any point, feeling as they do that their country abandoned them, when they needed it most. Not as most people would assume, that they abandoned the country.

I'm interested in the views of the denizens of P.ie, particularly those who have in the past left, and those who are still abroad. Should you return? And, yes or no, why?

For me, I saw shoots of change, a possible end to the two party hegemony that got us in the mess we are in. I'm not so confident now, however. And tbf, I can see us heading on a collision course with the next financial crisis, at full tilt. I'd like to know if other emigrés are of a similar mindset. Are we FUBAR'ed, irredeemable, totally screwed, or should we look forward with confidence?
The low taxes, wonderful Health/Public Services, cheap housing, superior infrastructure, effective politics/justice/public admin systems, ........................................and then I woke up!!!!!
 

bustedshaun

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Quite a few rellies drinking their way around Oz for the last 5 or 6 years must be getting to the point of sheet or get off the pot regarding starting families and buying houses.
 

DC0001

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EU man / woman goes to Middle East for work = Ex Pat

Middle East Man / Woman comes to EU for work = immigrant
 

purpledon

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Not on our lives are we returning. We've done it twice and on both occasions when we returned we regretted the decision.

Naivety was our downfall, wrongly believing things will change in Ireland.
They didn't and they will not.

We've a fairly broad circle off friends, some married with children, some married but thinking of starting a family. All of us have done the rotation back to Ireland thinking it will be better, sadly it was diabolical.

Now we collectively enjoy terrific careers with very comfortable lifestyles and none of the stresses that dogged us when we resided in Ireland being squeezed along with all the other middle class workers..

Na, ye can keep the Irish pipedream - it's empty.
Pray tell, please inform us of the terrific careers that you and your buddies currently enjoy.

Are you living rent and mortgage free or what?

Do you now enjoy the same things abroad that you despised in Ireland?

Any chance you and your buddies pay the state back for your education?

The combined efforts of the Catholic Church and the State have done their job very well indeed of creating a compliant and obiedient people.

It worked in the 1950s, 1980s and again from 2006 to the present day.

Run rabbit run, run, run.
 


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