Why so little talk of the upcoming Italian referendum in the media?

ScoobyDoo

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Voters expected to heavily reject this, in which case Renzi would almost certainly resign, leading to further uncertainty and the whole future of the Euro (and EU) put in even more doubt.

With only a couple of weeks to go, this is barely even getting a mention anywhere.

Heads in sand again, sure it'll be grand lads :roll:

https://www.ft.com/content/7ea6837a-ad83-11e6-ba7d-76378e4fef24
 


Brera

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The coverage of other European countries and general eu matters is pretty dire in the Irish media to begin with.

It looks likely Renzi will lose, which has the potential start another crisis in the eurozone. The Italian banks are still in a dire state and it won't take much to push them over the edge.
 

GDPR

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The Irish media will have a nervous breakdown if they have any more bad news. Brexit and Trump has sent the Liberal Luvvies who populate the Irish media into meltdown. The Sword of Damocles is hanging over their Liberal heads, but they desperately tell themselves and their readers, as Scooby Doo says above, that "Sure it'll be grand!"
 

Sister Mercedes

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Montrose is in apoplexy over Trump but ignores the rise of fascism within its own union in Hungary, Poland and Austria etc.
 

Clanrickard

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Montrose is in apoplexy over Trump but ignores the rise of fascism within its own union in Hungary, Poland and Austria etc.
Mainly because we speak the same language. It is easier just copy and paste from US media and get American talkingheads than non-English speaking ones. The OP is right. If this doesn't pass and Renzi goes there could be yet more turmoil.
 

anto2

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You have to be a FT subscriber to open that link . I got to it though by a Google search .
 
Last edited:

anto2

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Yes ,



>>>After Brexit and Donald Trump, prepare for the return of the eurozone crisis. If Matteo Renzi, Italian prime minister, loses his constitutional referendum on December 4, I would expect a sequence of events that would raise questions of Italy’s participation in the eurozone.






The underlying causes of this extremely disturbing possibility have nothing to do with the referendum itself. The most important was Italy’s economic performance since it adopted the euro in 1999. Total factor productivity, the portion of economic output not explained by labour and capital, has fallen in Italy by about 5 per cent since then whereas in Germany and France it went up by about 10 per cent.

The second source was the failure by the EU to construct a proper economic and banking union after the eurozone crisis of 2010-2012 and to impose austerity instead. If you want to know why Angela Merkel cannot be the leader of the free world, look no further. The German chancellor could not even lead Europe when it mattered. <<...etc ,etc .
 

gleeful

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Socratus O' Pericles

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Montrose is in apoplexy over Trump but ignores the rise of fascism within its own union in Hungary, Poland and Austria etc.
Not to mention all the retired 50-something retired Public Servants wandering around Dublin 18 another kind but still fascists.
 

Sister Mercedes

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I've seen several articles in the Irish media refer to it in the last two weeks. For example this one:
Markets jittery as Italian premier faces defeat in referendum - Independent.ie

David McWilliams has covered it too.

David McWilliams: Why Italy is the next country to fall to Trumpism - Independent.ie

So, I don't know what the strop is about.
When have you heard #Marian or Aine Lawlor discussing Italy, except in the context of wine-tasting holidays in Tuscany?
 

flavirostris

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Ditto the Austrian Presidential re-run with Hofer and Van Der Bellen, which would potentially be another big blow to the EU.
 

an modh coinniolach

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When have you heard #Marian or Aine Lawlor discussing Italy, except in the context of wine-tasting holidays in Tuscany?
One suspects that for Montrosians wine tasting in Italy is the very raison d'être of the E.U., a fundamental right now being interfered with by hordes of unclean populists.
 
O

Oscurito

When have you heard #Marian or Aine Lawlor discussing Italy, except in the context of wine-tasting holidays in Tuscany?
I don't listen to them.

I just think that the OP could have dwelt more on the actual issue of the Italian referendum.
 
O

Oscurito

The navel-gazing in this thread is cringeworthy. No-one is talking about the actual referendum. Everyone is having a sneer about Irish journalists' coverage of it.

If that's where it's going, then at least have it moved to media.

:roll:
 

im axeled

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The navel-gazing in this thread is cringeworthy. No-one is talking about the actual referendum. Everyone is having a sneer about Irish journalists' coverage of it.

If that's where it's going, then at least have it moved to media.

:roll:
it is taxpayers on about how their money is spent, not that they have much of a say on it
 

sic transit

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Yet another Italian government crisis is about as interesting as the Ryanair flight arrival stats. Really nothing to see here and business as usual for Italy.
 

Sister Mercedes

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The navel-gazing in this thread is cringeworthy. No-one is talking about the actual referendum. Everyone is having a sneer about Irish journalists' coverage of it.

If that's where it's going, then at least have it moved to media.

:roll:
The subject of the referendum (constitutional reform) is irrelevant to most people outside of Italy. What's important is what will happen if it's defeated. Renzi would most likely have to resign and a general election could elect parties who want to take Italy out of the Euro. Italy is one of the largest sovereign debts in the world, so converting that to Lira would lead to massive losses for most European banks and pension funds and the next round of the European debt crisis.
 

Strawberry

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The subject of the referendum (constitutional reform) is irrelevant to most people outside of Italy. What's important is what will happen if it's defeated. Renzi would most likely have to resign and a general election could elect parties who want to take Italy out of the Euro. Italy is one of the largest sovereign debts in the world, so converting that to Lira would lead to massive losses for most European banks and the next round of the European debt crisis.
There's no guarantee that Renzi would resign though, he backtracked on that particular threat as soon as the polls began to look like he might lose. If the consequences of him going were that serious for European banks, Merkel would prevail on him to stay.
 


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