Why will the Pope not let priests get married?

redmonite

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Not to the Roman Catholic church, as I'm not a member. But I contribute to my own church. You can't expect people to work for nothing, and churches don't heat or maintain themselves.
Agreed, but sometimes it's hard to listen to the demands from people who have contributed nothing, ( and this isn't an Irish water thread!)
 


stakerwallace

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So he might allow some married men to be priests as long as they are sent to remote areas where no one can see that they have a wife and family
any place outside the Vatican is remote
 

GDPR

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It's all about control, control of the lives of the men and women within the church and control of money, property etc. Not something that they would give up willingly.
 

GrainneDee

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Agreed, but sometimes it's hard to listen to the demands from people who have contributed nothing, ( and this isn't an Irish water thread!)
It's not about money at the end of the day. The church, any church of any denomination, is there for the people who go there every day, and those who turn up at Christmas. For the people who put the money on the plate every week and for those who never put their hands in their pockets.

The issue of priests earning a reasonable salary for the work they do shouldn't even be a matter of discussion. They are professionals, with third level qualifications, and they work hard. It's a demanding and lonely life, and you have to be available 24 hours a day. They should be paid centrally from the funds that the people of the church contribute, along with other sources such as investments and capital. Just like any other employer/employee situation.
 

GrainneDee

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It's all about control, control of the lives of the men and women within the church and control of money, property etc. Not something that they would give up willingly.
In what way has it anything to do with property or money?
 

murkeyside

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One of the biggest costs for c of e is housing and pension for retired clergy and spouses.

Married men with families will want a different retirement to single men. And certainly Anglican clergy seem to be very long lived.

Plus you can't pay a family man what you can get away with paying a single man with no kids - it is fairly normal for married clergy in the c of e to have a spouse earning a good salary to help support the family as the clergy salary isn't particularly good anyway
 

GDPR

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In what way has it anything to do with property or money?
As alluded by another poster the decision originally a thousand years ago, had a lot to do with it. Now, if marriage was allowed, money for the family particularly when the priest retires would be a factor.
 

GrainneDee

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As alluded by another poster the decision originally a thousand years pago, had a lot to do with it. Now, if marriage was allowed, money for the family particularly when the priest retires would be a factor.
A priest is an employee. What do other employees do? They make provisions for their families from their salaries. Simple
 

GrainneDee

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One of the biggest costs for c of e is housing and pension for retired clergy and spouses.

Married men with families will want a different retirement to single men. And certainly Anglican clergy seem to be very long lived.

Plus you can't pay a family man what you can get away with paying a single man with no kids - it is fairly normal for married clergy in the c of e to have a spouse earning a good salary to help support the family as the clergy salary isn't particulu y good anyway
As I said to Ted, a priest is an employee. It's up to him or her to make provision for their families out of their salary. Employers don't take into account whether an employee is single or married Like many jobs in professions dealing with people, priests generally accept that a lower salary goes with the territory.
 

GDPR

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A priest is an employee. What do other employees do? They make provisions for their families from their salaries. Simple
Agreed. But this organisation is likely to unwilling and would have to be dragged to let's say, do the right thing in this hypothetical scenario, to make allowance beyond the existing arrangements of supporting one individual.
 

GrainneDee

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Agreed. But this organisation is likely to unwilling and would have to be dragged to let's say, do the right thing in this hypothetical scenario, to make allowance beyond the existing arrangements of supporting one individual.
True enough. I'm just pointing out that this is why the issue of property etc. is nonsense as an argument.
 

Cruimh

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In the past I have mentioned a man, Alfred O'Rahilly, who left his seminary (he was to be a Jesuit), married, entered academia, had and raised a family, and after the death of his wife returned to his original vocation - was ordained into the Holy Ghost Fathers in 1955 by Archbishop McQuaid and ended up a Knight of Saint Gregory and Monsignor.

Since then we have had Married Anglican priests accepted into the RC Priesthood.

But this is a new one to me - An ordained priest leaves the ministry to marry and years later, on the death of his wife, is accepted back into the priesthood.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/20...return-altar/ebRyLWyZSgGgF3C0a5BsMP/story.htm

Frank Daly’s remarkable journey back to the altar of the Roman Catholic Church is the story of a thoughtful and accomplished man who studied theology in Rome, who baptized babies in Dedham and Sudbury, who fell in love and left the priesthood for a woman who became his wife and the mother of his two children.


It’s also the story of bedrock faith and of a priestly calling that was coaxed back to life after the searing grief of his wife’s death two years ago.


“I remember thinking that I would love to see him as a priest again,’’ said his daughter, Meghan Daly Murphy of Mansfield. “He’s just a special man. He has a gift.’’


The second of four children born to immigrants from Skibbereen in County Cork, Daly had his first priestly gift conferred upon him in late 1967 at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, where he had studied at the North American College. His mother, brother, and sisters were there for his ordination as was his uncle from Ireland, Monsignor Michael Daly, witnessing his first steps into what would become a decidedly unconventional priestly life.
 

diaspora-mick

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In the past I have mentioned a man, Alfred O'Rahilly, who left his seminary (he was to be a Jesuit), married, entered academia, had and raised a family, and after the death of his wife returned to his original vocation - was ordained into the Holy Ghost Fathers in 1955 by Archbishop McQuaid and ended up a Knight of Saint Gregory and Monsignor.

Since then we have had Married Anglican priests accepted into the RC Priesthood.

But this is a new one to me - An ordained priest leaves the ministry to marry and years later, on the death of his wife, is accepted back into the priesthood.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/20...return-altar/ebRyLWyZSgGgF3C0a5BsMP/story.htm
Truly a wonderous tale which compares with the beatification of John Sullivan ... petunia

'Protestant priest' John Sullivan beatified in Dublin - BBC News
 

Old Mr Grouser

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There are several Rites of the RCC that have always ordained married men.

And the Latin Rite now ordains former Anglican clergy who're married.
There's a story now in the Catholic Herald - Pope Francis says the Church should reflect on married priests

It seems he's concerned about the shortage of vocations in some places, and the idea is that “viri probati” - laymen with leadership potential - could be ordained as priests even if they're married.

From other news-reports,such as this one - Pope raises prospect of married men becoming priests  - it seems that the present proposal relates only to Brazil where the shortage of priests is being blamed for the RCC losing ground to other faiths.

How times change.

[video=youtube;Lb1JL5Bbkak]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lb1JL5Bbkak[/video]
 

Cruimh

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Irish cardinal says priests know nothing about marriage

[h=2]An Irish Catholic cardinal in Dallas said “priests are not the best people to train others for marriage" pointing out they "don't have the experience".[/h]Priests should not prepare couples for marriage as they know nothing about it themselves a leading Vatican cardinal has stated.
Irish-born Cardinal Kevin Farrell , head of the Vatican Laity, family and Life ministry said, “priests are not the best people to train others for marriage.”
“They have no credibility; they have never lived the experience; they may know moral theology, dogmatic theology in theory, but to go from there to putting it into practice every day….they don’t have the experience.”
Though I'd like to see him explain this

Where ordination of women was concerned Cardinal Farrell asked “do we want to turn them into clerics? We don’t. They have to be people of the world who live in the world.
Why do all women have to be people of the world but not all men?
 

SweenyTodd

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You are viewing the issue entirely from a secular view point. That is why you don't understand people of faith's actions.
 


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