Will an 8th of March strike for choice make a wit of difference or annoy middle ground?

Congalltee

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Will you take a day off work on March 8th to

First comes the witty it downs. Astrike by students and academics: how will anyone notice?

Then momentum builds (which it isn't yet).

Then some trade unions hop on the bandwagon (getting over embarrassment of no national strike over savage cuts and bank bailout).

To have any impact, a strike needs to disrupt, block, inconvenience those without alienating the public too much.

All this set against a backdrop of a constitutional convention yet to report.

It seems daft at best and counter productive, at worst.
 


SeanieFitz

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Will you take a day off work on March 8th to

First comes the witty it downs. Astrike by students and academics: how will anyone notice?

Then momentum builds (which it isn't yet).

Then some trade unions hop on the bandwagon (getting over embarrassment of no national strike over savage cuts and bank bailout).

To have any impact, a strike needs to disrupt, block, inconvenience those without alienating the public too much.

All this set against a backdrop of a constitutional convention yet to report.

It seems daft at best and counter productive, at worst.
Well they seem to have got your attention anyhoo!

I take it that you won't be supporting?
 

Roll_On

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A strike won't happen, jobless people can't strike technically. Agreed this won't be anything like #marref given what we now know about fetal development and we now know how horrific the UKs 1960s legislation on the topic is, I really can't see Irish people going for it.
 

TheWolf

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A strike won't happen, jobless people can't strike technically. Agreed this won't be anything like #marref given what we now know about fetal development and we now know how horrific the UKs 1960s legislation on the topic is, I really can't see Irish people going for it.
Who says they're jobless?
Surprised someone like you would come out with a generalisation like that tbh.
 

Equinox

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Are the unions balloting their members? It could provide an insightful straw poll, (with a percentage adjustment to allow for the workshy that just fancy a day off.)

Will those that turn up for work because they disagree with the action or at least see no reason to strike on an issue that is nothing to do with their work practices be black-balled and attacked by rabid pro-choicers (probably).

This is a silly idea.
 

SeanieFitz

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Are the unions balloting their members? It could provide an insightful straw poll, (with a percentage adjustment to allow for the workshy that just fancy a day off.)

Will those that turn up for work because they disagree with the action or at least see no reason to strike on an issue that is nothing to do with their work practices be black-balled and attacked by rabid pro-choicers (probably).

This is a silly idea.

I can't see many people taking time off work for this, most people have their mind made up and those that are undecided will not protest
 

Hibee

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The state will grind to a halt with bloggers , a few angry columnists , bakers and a few radical NGOS downing tools .
 

Emily Davison

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Will you take a day off work on March 8th to

First comes the witty it downs. Astrike by students and academics: how will anyone notice?

Then momentum builds (which it isn't yet).

Then some trade unions hop on the bandwagon (getting over embarrassment of no national strike over savage cuts and bank bailout).

To have any impact, a strike needs to disrupt, block, inconvenience those without alienating the public too much.

All this set against a backdrop of a constitutional convention yet to report.

It seems daft at best and counter productive, at worst.
Really. And the Polish ladies managed to stop the legislation with their march.
 

Dubstudent

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The 8th Amendment Referendum could be Ireland's Brexit/Trump moment.

The silent majority may come out in force and give an answer the libs don't like.

Cue: Wailing anti democratic protests.
 

Congalltee

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Really. And the Polish ladies managed to stop the legislation with their march.
Poland has a tradition of mass protests.
That march was to row back on their civil and human rights. Hence, its popular appeal.

This is very different country and situation. Unless another non-Christian debtist is killed by our laws and practices; there is no impetuous for direct action, let alone a strike.
 

Congalltee

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The 8th Amendment Referendum could be Ireland's Brexit/Trump moment.

The silent majority may come out in force and give an answer the libs don't like.

Cue: Wailing anti democratic protests.
It depends on the question; an amendment in cases of rape, incest, FFA and non-immediate threats to life has a good chance of passing.

Repeal, with voters forced to trust politicians has very little chance in my view. There aren't enough people willing to trust women decide what is best for them.
 

Vega1447

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The 8th Amendment Referendum could be Ireland's Brexit/Trump moment.

The silent majority may come out in force and give an answer the libs don't like.

Cue: Wailing anti democratic protests.
An Irish Times Ipsos MRBI poll last year found that 18 per cent of respondents thought it should not be repealed; 55 per cent said it should be repealed to allow for limited access to abortion in the cases of rape and fatal foetal abnormality; 19 per cent said it should be repealed to allow for abortion in all cases requested, while 8 per cent had no opinion.
Mebbe silent but on the basis of the poll not a majority..
 

Hitchcock

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Poland has a tradition of mass protests.
That march was to row back on their civil and human rights. Hence, its popular appeal.

This is very different country and situation. Unless another non-Christian debtist is killed by our laws and practices; there is no impetuous for direct action, let alone a strike.
Poland has a tradition of mass protests.
That march was to row back on their civil and human rights. Hence, its popular appeal.
I think you are generally correct about the situation in Poland, the direct attack by the Polish government elicited a big response, the situation in Ireland is different in that it's a long standing law that many people wish to have repealed.

This is very different country and situation. Unless another non-Christian debtist is killed by our laws and practices; there is no impetuous for direct action, let alone a strike.
I don't think those arguing for a strike are suggesting that the Irish situation is directly akin to Poland but they are adopting a successful tactic to highlight an important issue and to maintain pressure on the government for a referendum.

Recent years have seen very significant protests mainly on economic issues but the response to protests on issues such as abortion right s are on the increase.

I think to say there is no impetuous for 'direct action' is a bit hasty, let's wait and see what response the strike gets.
 

Congalltee

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My fear is that strike will be a flop and it will taken by the anti-anendment/repeal lobby as a stick to beat the government (who are in no rush to do anything )
 

Equinox

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I can't see many people taking time off work for this, most people have their mind made up and those that are undecided will not protest
After a cursory google I still can't find any reference to any union actually balloting their members on a strike. If that doesn't happen then it really has no legitimacy.
 

DaveM

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Will you take a day off work on March 8th to

First comes the witty it downs. Astrike by students and academics: how will anyone notice?

Then momentum builds (which it isn't yet).

Then some trade unions hop on the bandwagon (getting over embarrassment of no national strike over savage cuts and bank bailout).

To have any impact, a strike needs to disrupt, block, inconvenience those without alienating the public too much.

All this set against a backdrop of a constitutional convention yet to report.

It seems daft at best and counter productive, at worst.
To be honest I don't see this having much impact. I don't see it doing their campaign any harm either though. They'll get some media coverage. Keep the issue in the spotlight. That's about it.
 

A Voice

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I think it will be a very baaaaaad move for the pro-repealers. People will resent the intrusion of socio-sexual matters into the workplace. They're already sick of teacher and bus driver strikes, with the prospect of more transport strikes in the offing.
 

Emily Davison

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My fear is that strike will be a flop and it will taken by the anti-anendment/repeal lobby as a stick to beat the government (who are in no rush to do anything )
I wouldn't worry. We've waited a long time and another year or two is fine. We're nearly there.
 

forest

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I am really hopping this referendum fails
Just to wipe the smug look off repeal the 8ers faces
 


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