Will Brian Cowen be the first Taoiseach to be Knighted for saving British Banks?

Gemlarkin

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Will Brian Cowen be the first Taoiseach to be Knighted for saving British Banks?

Mr Cowen has gone to extraordinary lenghts to save British , German, and French banks from billions of losses, incurred by stupidly lending to Irish named foreign owned banks, during the period he presided over an economy which was substantially comprised of a pyramid scheme of his design.

Currently his Government a finalizing a STG£7 billion loan from her Majesty's Government to our Government which will be used to underwrite the losses of these British Banks.

It seems the other Euro members would not lend us the money to bail out the British banks.

Who could be more worthy, than Mr Cowen of a Knighthood for saving the British taxpayers the expense of picking up these 7 billion of losses and providing the British to earn 5% on the loan.He might qualify for the Order of St Patrick

The Order of St. Patrick
Founded by George III in 1783 as a single-class order associated with UK's Ireland, the Order of St. Patrick fell into disuse following Irish independence in 1936. The last surviving knight was Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, who died in 1974. Although no knight of St Patrick has been created since the Irish independence, the dormant order technically still exists. Queen Elizabeth II is the current sovereign of this order.


He might even get a hereditary peerage and be styled Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount or Baron

Sir Brian Cowen Baron Biffo has a has a ring ring to it
 


truthflyer

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Will Brian Cowen be the first Taoiseach to be Knighted for saving British Banks?

Mr Cowen has gone to extraordinary lenghts to save British , German, and French banks from billions of losses, incurred by stupidly lending to Irish named foreign owned banks, during the period he presided over an economy which was substantially comprised of a pyramid scheme of his design.

Currently his Government a finalizing a STG£7 billion loan from her Majesty's Government to our Government which will be used to underwrite the losses of these British Banks.

It seems the other Euro members would not lend us the money to bail out the British banks.

Who could be more worthy, than Mr Cowen of a Knighthood for saving the British taxpayers the expense of picking up these 7 billion of losses and providing the British to earn 5% on the loan.He might qualify for the Order of St Patrick

The Order of St. Patrick
Founded by George III in 1783 as a single-class order associated with UK's Ireland, the Order of St. Patrick fell into disuse following Irish independence in 1936. The last surviving knight was Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, who died in 1974. Although no knight of St Patrick has been created since the Irish independence, the dormant order technically still exists. Queen Elizabeth II is the current sovereign of this order.


He might even get a hereditary peerage and be styled Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount or Baron

Sir Brian Cowen Baron Biffo has a has a ring ring to it
NOTE:- The majority of the Seven Billion is Britian's contribution to the IMF and EU funds, only a small proportion will be in the form of a loan to Ireland.

You clearly need to get your facts straight
 

Gemlarkin

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The collapse was supposed to happen on Kenny's watch

The collapse was supposed to happen on Kenny's watch just like the cuts to public sector pay.The depositors stopped believing the bovine excrement and moved their deposits.

Of course the money will be drawn down. We need 60 billion alone for the exchequer over the next 4 years, plus more for the banks so we can save the bondholders as FF want.
 

Jakey

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I think the more relevant question is whether George Osborne should be formally invited by the people of Tipperary to take up his Baronetcy of Ballentaylor and Balleylemon. The help he has given to Ireland over this past week has been quite extraordinary. Listening to Lenihan on Newstalk this morning, it emerged that not only are the British prepared to extend a bilateral loan to Ireland, but they also prevented the French and Germans from bullying Ireland into raising its corporate tax rate. Lenihan was almost gushing in his praise for them.

I think it's now fairly obvious to everyone who our real friends are. The Germans inspired this crisis with their loose talk, the French and Austrians then sought to take advantage of it, and only the brave, honourable British stood by us in our hour of need.

Three cheers for Mr Osborne!
 

Anglo Celt

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I think the more relevant question is whether George Osborne should be formally invited by the people of Tipperary to take up his Baronetcy of Ballentaylor and Balleylemon. The help he has given to Ireland over this past week has been quite extraordinary. Listening to Lenihan on Newstalk this morning, it emerged that not only are the British prepared to extend a bilateral loan to Ireland, but they also prevented the French and Germans from bullying Ireland into raising its corporate tax rate. Lenihan was almost gushing in his praise for them.

I think it's now fairly obvious to everyone who our real friends are. The Germans inspired this crisis with their loose talk, the French and Austrians then sought to take advantage of it, and only the brave, honourable British stood by us in our hour of need.

Three cheers for Mr Osborne!
+1

Indeed!
 

Scipio

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I think the more relevant question is whether George Osborne should be formally invited by the people of Tipperary to take up his Baronetcy of Ballentaylor and Balleylemon. The help he has given to Ireland over this past week has been quite extraordinary. Listening to Lenihan on Newstalk this morning, it emerged that not only are the British prepared to extend a bilateral loan to Ireland, but they also prevented the French and Germans from bullying Ireland into raising its corporate tax rate. Lenihan was almost gushing in his praise for them.

I think it's now fairly obvious to everyone who our real friends are. The Germans inspired this crisis with their loose talk, the French and Austrians then sought to take advantage of it, and only the brave, honourable British stood by us in our hour of need.

Three cheers for Mr Osborne!
Or, more realistically, Osbourne realized that with the U.K. being so deeply implicated in, and exposed to, Irish economic difficulties, the only sensible action possible was to offer a bi-lateral loan in the hope that the contagion won't spread across the water:

If the Irish economy implodes, the first place to be hit by the "shrapnel" will be the UK.

[...]

The Northern Ireland economy would certainly be ducking for cover. It is estimated that around 40% of exports from the North go south.

Figures for the UK as a whole help explain why Britain is taking such a keen interest in the plight of its Irish neighbours.

The Anglo-Irish economic ties include:

The Irish Republic is the UK's fifth largest export market
Every man, woman and child in the Republic spends an average of £3,607 per year on British goods
The Republic is the UK's number one export market for the food and drink sectors
62 Irish companies are listed on the London Stock Exchange

More pressing is the credit exposure of British banks to Irish borrowers, amounting to more than £50bn. All of the above helps to explain why UK Chancellor George Osborne is being a good neighbour.
BBC News - Loan marks thaw in UK-Irish relations

Not quite as "altruistic" as the Swedes it would seem.

As for Osbourne "preventing" the French and Germans bullying Ireland into raising our corporate tax rate, have you a source backing up that claim?
 

Anglo Celt

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Not quite as "altruistic" as the Swedes it would seem.
Another Monarchical country to the rescue Scipio. That must really be hard for a Republican Francophile like your good self to take petunia
 
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Jakey

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As for Osbourne "preventing" the French and Germans bullying Ireland into raising our corporate tax rate, have you a source backing up that claim?
As I wrote in my post, Lenihan himself made the claim on Newstalk. He said the British had been immensely helpful to Ireland in fighting our corner within the EU re corporation tax.

The bilateral loan could be put down to realpolitik, but sticking up for Ireland's right to set its own low corporation tax (which, let us not forget, has even enticed away Britain's own firms)? That is a friendly and honourable gesture indeed.
 

Scipio

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As I wrote in my post, Lenihan himself made the claim on Newstalk. He said the British had been immensely helpful to Ireland in fighting our corner within the EU re corporation tax.

The bilateral loan could be put down to realpolitik, but sticking up for Ireland's right to set its own low corporation tax (which, let us not forget, has even enticed away Britain's own firms)? That is a friendly and honourable gesture indeed.
The corporation tax rate debate is, and was, a red herring as Michael Noonan made clear on RTE Radio today.

Olli Rehn, when asked by Noonan about the subject last week, assured him that the setting of tax rates was entirely a matter for the government, not the EU.

The government, pathetic as they are, are trying to claim a victory on something that was never realistically under threat.

Secondly, why would France and Germany care what a non-member of the Eurozone like Britain has to say about Ireland's corporation tax rate if raising it were going to be a condition to the provision of money by an EU fund to which Britain will not be contributing?
 
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Jakey

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The corporation tax rate debate is, and was, a red herring as Michael Noonan made clear on RTE Radio today.

Olli Rehn, when asked by Noonan about the subject last week, assured him that the setting of tax rates was entirely a matter for the government, not the EU.

The government, pathetic as they are, are trying to claim a victory on something that was never realistically under threat.

Secondly, why would France and Germany care what a non-member of the Eurozone like Britain has to say about Ireland's corporation tax rate if raising it were going to be a condition to the provision of money by an EU fund to which Britain will not be contributing?
I think the opinion of Mr Lenihan, who sat in the ECOFIN meeting, is rather more relevant than the opinion of Mr Noonan, who did not. Mr Lenihan was quite explicit that the corporation tax issue was raised by some of the other finance ministers and that the British were immensely helpful in battling for Ireland.

As for your second point, the corporation tax rate is an EU-wide matter, not a Eurozone matter. Moreover, simple politics dictates that the views of an important member state like Britain will be accorded some considerable degree of respect in any such debate.

Let us gave praise where it is due. The British and Mr Osborne have shown themselves to be faithful friends of Ireland. It is churlish to deny it.
 


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