With a bit of creativity Irish can become used in the community again

DuineEile

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Lots of money is wasted on Irish. We could probably spend half as much for treble the impact. Practical measures would be good. There are plenty of Irish classes available. An online dictionary with pronunciations would help. Some support for a few cafés and shops where the staff spoke Irish. Much better than dusty old company reports.

D
 


Cato

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In fairness there are two other threads live concerning Irish right now. Could this not have been fit into one of them? It seems strange to fragment the discussion so much.

That being said I agree with the broad trust of your post.
 

Cael

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I wonder if a new Fáinne campaign shouldnt be started? I think its a good idea. But, lets not be too precious about it. Give a Fáinne to anyone who is willing to use whatever few words they have. I mean the Fáinne shouldnt say "Im a fluent speaker" but simply "Im on the side of Irish and if you say Dia dhuit to me, I'll say Dia is Muire dhuit to you."
 

DuineEile

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In fairness there are two other threads live concerning Irish right now. Could this not have been fit into one of them? It seems strange to fragment the discussion so much.

That being said I agree with the broad trust of your post.
I started this thread because a poster said that the fact that Irish language enthusiasts were always on the defensive proved that Irish was a waste of time.

That got me thinking that nearly every thread is started by an Irish basher, so I thought I would start a positive thread.

The fact that a thread calling the Language Comissioner a MORON (not my emphasis) and a thread stating that pupils are giving up Irish in droves are still on the home page whilst a thread with a positive slant sinks like a stone disappoints but does not surprise me.

D
 

diy01

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In an interview not long before he died, Máirtín Ó Cadhain was asked what was in store for the 'Gaelic-speaking community'? The interview was all in Irish but the subtitles said it all.

'Death, I would imagine. ...I hate to have to say that.'

Here is the relevant clip (2 minute clip from the documentary about his life)
Mairtín Ó Cadhain: Readers Under Fire on Vimeo

That was over forty years ago. I wonder what he would have to say now?
 

L'Chaim

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I don't understand why people don't see the point in their native language. I always find it strange that so many Irish people are so proud and loud in their aversion to their native language. In Israel Hebrew was reintroduced as a native language back in 1948 and Jews who lived there and moved there embraced it, and today it's the first language of most Israelis. I don't understand what happened in the Irish psyche over the centuries to make so many today reject their native language
 

diy01

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Have you not studied Irish history?

An Irish speaking Ireland was always going to be a threat to the English interest. Officials in the London and the Pale were very clear about this. Linguistic colonialism never had it so good as in Ireland.

By the time the Free State came into existence, the situation was arguably too far gone, at least in terms of reinstating Irish as the main language of the population as it had been just sixty to seventy years earlier. On the other hand, the fact that the percentage of native speakers dropped from about 12% at the time to less than 2% today has more to do with terrible policy and a fair few native speakers believing that their language wasn't worth passing on to their children.
 

L'Chaim

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Have you not studied Irish history?
I did, but I always found Irish history to be one of the worst taught subjects in school (along with irish). Irish history, for me, seemed to start with Pearce and end with Dev and the history of that 30 years or so depended on the view point of each particular history teacher. oh I'm sure I could tell you quite a bit about 1916 and the civil war, but anything before that and I'd be hard pushed to know anything, based on what I was taught in school. I'd know more about European history than I would irish history
 

diy01

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That's unfortunate but I'm not too surprised. You were shortchanged!

Three books worth reading for those with an interest in language shift...

The Politics of Language in Ireland 1366-1922: A Sourcebook by Tony Crowley (Routledge, 2000)

Wars of Words: The Politics of language in Ireland, 1537-2004 by Tony Crowley
(Oxford, 2005)

The Languages of Ireland, edited by Michael Cronin and Cormac Ó Cuilleanáin (Four Courts Press, 2006) This one also covers the history and presence in Ireland of languages such as Latin, Anglo-Norman French, Old Norse, Scots>'Ulster Scots' and even German.
 

MDaniel

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I started this thread because a poster said that the fact that Irish language enthusiasts were always on the defensive proved that Irish was a waste of time.

That got me thinking that nearly every thread is started by an Irish basher, so I thought I would start a positive thread.

The fact that a thread calling the Language Comissioner a MORON (not my emphasis) and a thread stating that pupils are giving up Irish in droves are still on the home page whilst a thread with a positive slant sinks like a stone disappoints but does not surprise me.

D
Well said and done. There are many Irish speakers who are afraid to speak Irish too loud or to mention the fact that they sometimes speak Irish with others.
This leads many non Irish speakers to underevaluate the number of Irish speakers using their language on a daily basis.
I am an Irish speaker and, without being too loud about it, I often declare myself to be an Irish speaker if the conversation or the circumstances make it sound natural.
It's amazing to hear some people bashing Irish, maybe their teachers were so bad that they need to exorcise the pain.
And one more remark: so many posters and people in general complain about Irish or Irish grammar having being shoved down their throats: well, if that was really true, they would be fluent now and it would be a part of themselves.
No, the problem is that Irish students sit in a classroom five times a week for 13/14 years pretending to learn while (many but not all) a teacher pretends to teach them.
I have met teachers who had been teaching for over 15 years the language and confessed to me that they haven't spoken a word of Irish outside the classroom (when they do!) since their graduation.
They don't realize that they transmit this type of attitude to their students who do feel the lack of enthusiasm and "real-life situation" their bored teachers go through.

Níl aon duine baráilte as an Ghaeilge:lol:
Nobody is "barred" from speaking the language:)
 

diy01

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Regarding the OP, it's also about normalizing the language.

I hear there is Scrabble 'as Gaeilge' now. Available just in time for Christmas. Something which might seem so insignificant in the bigger picture can make a difference.
http://gaelport.com/sonrai-nuachta?NewsItemID=5301

The first Irish-speaking toy for children has been created, too.
BB, the first Irish-speaking toy, gets set for Christmas

Things like this can make a difference for families trying to raise their children with Irish, particular those who live in urban areas far from the Gaeltacht.
 

TonyBird

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I would like to see 'Gaelgoirs' take the lead . For all the people who go on about 'our language' , I have not once met someone who came up to me and spoke Irish . Not in shops , not in pubs , not anywhere . Speak up for yer selves why dont ye ? Then others may follow your example . I would love a chance to use my mangled 'gaelgie ' . I am just to embarassed to . One thing 'Gaelgoirs' are good at , is sneering at people who arent fluent .
 

diy01

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You clearly don't have a chip on yer shoulder.

It sounds like an Irish speaker wouldn't get too far with you anyway...
 

diy01

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Then others may follow your example . I would love a chance to use my mangled 'gaelgie ' . I am just to embarassed to . One thing 'Gaelgoirs' are good at , is sneering at people who arent fluent .
Your post is dripping with resentment.
 

TonyBird

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You clearly don't have a chip on yer shoulder.

It sounds like an Irish speaker wouldn't get too far with you anyway...
I dont mean to be controversial . The evidence is clear . Nil gaelige na teanga na pobail .
 

diy01

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I get suspicious when people start using single quotation marks like you've done.
 

TonyBird

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The only thing I really 'resent' is the assumptions you make about me , just cos I disagree .
 


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