Women, you earn less and rightly so!

GDPR

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Polish MEP Janusz Korwin-Mikke during a debate in the European Parliament has said that women must earn less than men because they are weaker, smaller and less intelligent. He cited the examples of a Polish theoretical Physics Olympiad in which the top female was placed 800th, and that there are no females in the top 100 chess players as his rationale that women 'must earn less than men because they are weaker, they are smaller, they are less intelligent, and they must earn less'. Polish MEP: 'Women must earn less than men because they're weaker, smaller and less intelligent'

The EU itself would dispute this claim and indeed the EU has identified five main headings regarding the gender pay cap, namely:
- Direct discrimination
- The undervaluing of women's work
- Segregation in the labour market
- Traditions and stereotypes
- Balancing work and private life

Direct discrimination
Some women are paid less than men for doing the same job. This factor only explains a small part of the gender pay gap, due to the effectiveness of the European Union and national legislation.

The undervaluing of women's work
More frequently women earn less than men for doing jobs of equal value. One of the main causes is the way women's competences are valued compared to men's.
Jobs requiring similar skills, qualifications or experience tend to be poorly paid and undervalued when they are dominated by women rather than by men. For example, the (mainly female) cashiers in a supermarket usually earn less than the (mainly male) employees involved in stacking shelves and other more physical tasks.
In addition the evaluation of performance, and hence pay level and career progression, may also be biased in favour of men. For example, where women and men are equally well qualified, more value can be attached to responsibility for capital than to responsibility for people.

Segregation in the labour market
The gender pay gap is also reinforced by the segregation in the labour market. Women and men still tend to work in different jobs. On the one hand, women and men often predominate in different sectors. On the other hand, within the same sector or company women predominate in lower valued and lower paid occupations.
Women often work in sectors (for example in health, education, and public administration) where their work is lower valued and lower paid than those dominated by men. When we look at the health sector alone, 80% of those working in this sector are women.
Moreover, women are frequently employed as administrative assistants, shop assistants, or low skilled or unskilled workers - these occupations accounting for an important proportion of the female workforce. Many women work in low-paying occupations, for example, cleaning and care work.
Women are under-represented in managerial and senior positions. For example, women represent only around 17% of board members in the biggest publicly listed companies within the EU, around 4% of chairs of boards, and a third of scientists and engineers across Europe.

Traditions and stereotypes
Segregation is frequently linked to traditions and stereotypes. Whilst in some cases this may reflect personal choices, traditions and stereotypes may influence, for example, the choice of educational paths and, consequently, professional careers that girls and women make.
While around 60% of new university graduates are women, they are a minority in fields like mathematics, computing and engineering.
Consequently, there are fewer women working in scientific and technical jobs. In many cases this results in women working in lower valued and lower paid sectors of the economy.
Because of these traditions and stereotypes, women are expected to reduce their working hours or exit the labour market to carry out child or elderly care.

Balancing work and private life
Women experience greater difficulties than men when it comes to balancing work and private life.
Family, care and domestic responsibilities are still not equally shared. The task of looking after dependent family members is largely borne by women. Far more women than men choose to take parental leave. This fact, together with the lack of facilities for childcare and elderly care, means that women are often forced to exit the labour market: only 65.8% of women with young children in the EU are working, compared to 89.1% of men.
Although part-time work may be a personal choice, women have greater recourse to part-time work in order to combine work and family responsibilities. There is evidence of a pay gap in hourly earnings of part-time and full-time workers. Across Europe around 32% of women work part-time, compared to only around 8% of men.
Consequently, women have more career interruptions or work shorter hours than men. This has a negative impact on their career development and promotion prospects. It also means less financially rewarding careers.
What are the causes? - European Commission

Indeed the EU has further argued that closing the gender pay gap benefits employers and workers, gives greater profitability to the economy as a whole and promotes social justice and equal opportunities.

Closing the gender pay gap benefits employers and workers
Equality between women and men is vital for the creation of quality jobs. Introducing a gender perspective can help companies to:
recruit and retain the best employees;
create a positive work environment and gain the confidence of their employees;
make the best use of human resources and improve productivity and competitiveness;
have a better public image and higher shareholder value and a wider and more satisfied customer base.

Closing the gender pay gap gives greater profitability to the economy as a whole
Women have played a vital role in Europe's employment and economic growth and their skills and talent are necessary for the economic and social development of our societies. However, this is not reflected in their pay and position in the labour market. The undervaluing of women's work and the under-utilisation of women's skills is a lost resource for the economy and for society at large. A better use of women's skills allows them to better contribute to the economy as a whole.

Closing the gender pay gap promotes social justice and equal opportunities

Closing the gender pay gap can help to create a more equal and cohesive society. Valuing women's work and skills will motivate their performance and improve their economic independence. By increasing women's earnings throughout the lifecycle, the risk of falling into poverty will be reduced. The at-risk-of-poverty rate is around 22% for women over 65, compared to 16% of men over 65.
Why is it important to tackle the gender pay gap? - European Commission

Is this a laughing matter or something far more serious, thoughts?
 


ger12

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Your mans a bit of a nutter, I know a few Poles who are cringing right now (mind you, the Healy Raes have had me mortified on occasion). However the reality is that it's still not equal out there and it should be.
 

Zapped(CAPITALISMROTS)

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Your mans a bit of a nutter, I know a few Poles who are cringing right now (mind you, the Healy Raes have had me mortified on occasion). However the reality is that it's still not equal out there and it should be.
I think your being generous with the use of the word bit....................:rolleyes:
 

Betson

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According to the EU themselves the main cause of the pay gap resolved around the personal choices people when choosing their profession , that is not sexism.

Indeed given that girls do better in school and go to college in greater numbers they have in general more of a choice than males have in selecting what profession to study for in College. You can't call sexism when they themselves choose to go into the lesser paid occupations.
 

ger12

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According to the EU themselves the main cause of the pay gap resolved around the personal choices people when choosing their profession , that is not sexism.

Indeed given that girls do better in school and go to college in greater numbers they have in general more of a choice than males have in selecting what profession to study for in College. You can't call sexism when they themselves choose to go into the lesser paid occupations.
The personnel choices are often (very often) ones where women are backed into a corner.
 

silverharp

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The undervaluing of women's work
More frequently women earn less than men for doing jobs of equal value. One of the main causes is the way women's competences are valued compared to men's.
Jobs requiring similar skills, qualifications or experience tend to be poorly paid and undervalued when they are dominated by women rather than by men. For example, the (mainly female) cashiers in a supermarket usually earn less than the (mainly male) employees involved in stacking shelves and other more physical tasks.
In addition the evaluation of performance, and hence pay level and career progression, may also be biased in favour of men. For example, where women and men are equally well qualified, more value can be attached to responsibility for capital than to responsibility for people.
that is weak, apply for the shelf stacking jobs then. the other one sounds like HR not being the best paid area of a company, then dont do it, go into IT or accounting an you will be better paid
 

Betson

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Your mans a bit of a nutter, I know a few Poles who are cringing right now (mind you, the Healy Raes have had me mortified on occasion). However the reality is that it's still not equal out there and it should be.
Do you think everyone should be paid the same regardless of their profession and the hours they spend at work?

Parity will be reached when women CHOOSE to go into more of the higher paying stem occupations and CHOOSE to spend longer hours in work. This is up to themselves.
 

Betson

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The personnel choices are often (very often) ones where women are backed into a corner.
In what way , far more women are going to third level than men. Yet far more men are choosing the higher paid and more difficult professions.

Females have the overwhelming advantage in choosing what to study , how are they backed into a corner?
 

Truth.ie

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Lesbians earn 8% more than straight women.
I don't see anyone moaning about that.
 

runwiththewind

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In what way , far more women are going to third level than men. Yet far more men are choosing the higher paid and more difficult professions.

Females have the overwhelming advantage in choosing what to study , how are they backed into a corner?
Marriagea and children, both are the biggest hindrance to women's progression.
 

GDPR

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The most important job that I will ever have and the same goes for my other half, is that of being a parent and in particular the rearing of children. This is a related but separate issue to 'fair pay regardless of gender'. Therefore, this would seem to be an obvious area of conflict, family v's work, and familiar to us all I would suggest.
 

Felixness

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Old man makes stupid, old fashioned sexist comment, slow news day. Look, everyone has an embarrassing elderly relative that says stupid un PC nonsense. Nobody really takes it seriously, but I'm sure that won't stop the with hunt and the butt hurt masses taking to social media to have a melt down.
 

GDPR

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Old man makes stupid, old fashioned sexist comment, slow news day. Look, everyone has an embarrassing elderly relative that says stupid un PC nonsense. Nobody really takes it seriously, but I'm sure that won't stop the with hunt and the butt hurt masses taking to social media to have a melt down.
And yet you took the time to comment, so while you're here, have you any particular opinion on the OP?
 

runwiththewind

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In what way , far more women are going to third level than men. Yet far more men are choosing the higher paid and more difficult professions.

Females have the overwhelming advantage in choosing what to study , how are they backed into a corner?
Men aren't choosing anything, they are bring selected.

Why do you think the public and civil service are such a mess?

Senior and middle management are still predominately male.

Anything dominated by men is a disaster, politics, media the churches.

Go figure.
 

runwiththewind

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According to the EU link above , profession choice is the major one.
Nope, professional choice spins around marriage an children.
 

GDPR

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Men aren't choosing anything, they are bring selected.

Why do you think the public and civil service are such a mess?

Senior and middle management are still predominately male.

Anything dominated by men is a disaster, politics, media the churches.

Go figure.
Two Ministers for Justice and two Garda Commissioners, have had a gender balanced hand in making a fine mess of things, n'est pas?
 

Betson

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Men aren't choosing anything, they are bring selected.

Why do you think the public and civil service are such a mess?

Senior and middle management are still predominately male.

Anything dominated by men is a disaster, politics, media the churches.

Go figure.
All the major human developments be it scientific , medical , engineering , business , IT etc are also male dominated.
 


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