Your Time is up - the move towards the legalisation of euthanasia in Ireland has begun...81% now support it according to the Journal.ie

Catahualpa

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Looks like the next stage in the elimination of the Irish People is now being launched as the ultra liberal Journal does a poll showing 81% of respondents support Euthanasia

So, today we want to know: Would you support the legalisation of euthanasia in Ireland?


Poll Results:

Yes (894)



No (143)



I'm not sure / no opinion (63)



?height=400&version=4892728.jpg

Poll: Would you support the legalisation of euthanasia in Ireland?
Yesterday, New Zealand lawmakers voted in favour of making euthanasia legal.

www.thejournal.ie
www.thejournal.ie





I should imagine most of their readership are young upwardly mobile hipster types who swallow whole what they are told.

Of course what the supporters of Euthanasia fail to understand is that while it may at 1st be voluntary

- eventually it will be expected of you to avail of it....

About the time this lot start to pop their clogs!
 


Kevin Parlon

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It's a journal.ie poll. That said, I do support euthanasia in limited circumstances. Why would you want to deny a terminally ill person enduring pointless suffering from relief? So, yes to it. The case of mental anguish is far muddier given it is not a terminal condition and has the possibility of resolution. So: A person dying of stage 4 terminal cancer or MND? Yes with doctor sign off and with adequate provision to ensure pressure (an overstated risk by opponent IMO) from others is not a factor. A person suffering mental anguish? I can see the moral case for allowing this but the concomitant risks to people who might otherwise recover leads me to say no.

I find the Christian rationale for opposition to euthanasia incoherent and dogmatic.
 

Dame_Enda

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I support a limited euthanasia regime for people in agonising pain. But I would insist that there be safeguards to avoid Harold Shipman situations.
 

Buchaill Dana

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Catty doesn't understand the difference between assisted suicide and murder. Or he is lying for Jesus again.

But if I was a relative of his I would be tempted to smother him with a pillow.
 

Surkov

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It's a journal.ie poll. That said, I do support euthanasia in limited circumstances.
The question then becomes how limited?

Taking the example of an invasive cancer (a lot of pain). That can be managed via morphine and other extremely potent pain killers. Also, as it is, the doctor can ask the patient about their wishes regarding revival. Also, with many illnesses, even when it looks bleak, some people do unexpectedly recover.

The more popular euthanasia becomes, the less motivation there is to carry out research. Why pursue a difficult, initially expensive to research and arduous cure, when... a quick injection and it's all over?

And then of course: stepping stones.

Give a little finger, and the hand is taken.
 

yosef shompeter

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Do they enquire as to whether you desire euthanasia before or after they give you the injection? :geek:
 

Surkov

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It's a journal.ie poll. That said, I do support euthanasia in limited circumstances. Why would you want to deny a terminally ill person enduring pointless suffering from relief? So, yes to it. The case of mental anguish is far muddier given it is not a terminal condition and has the possibility of resolution. So: A person dying of stage 4 terminal cancer or MND? Yes with doctor sign off and with adequate provision to ensure pressure (an overstated risk by opponent IMO) from others is not a factor. A person suffering mental anguish? I can see the moral case for allowing this but the concomitant risks to people who might otherwise recover leads me to say no.

I find the Christian rationale for opposition to euthanasia incoherent and dogmatic.
I recall a case of a famous atheist paralyzed from the neck down (can't recall name at the mo). Perfectly healthy, got a virus. Given the option to die (Edwardian times). Wasn't having any of it. Went on to inspire millions and the creation of technologies to improve the lives of those in similar situations.

You could take inspiration from him.

Also, if more and more people opt for euthanasia, there is the very real danger they will 'inspire' others, who could recover, to 'take an easier path'. Also, as it becomes more and more normalised, attitudes, consciously and subconsciously could change. Not everywhere, and not all at once. But in time innocent people will feel pressurised in some way or another to 'take the easy route'. So you might give the option to die to a person today, but wind up in effect taking away the option to live from another down the line of consequences. It is morally hazardous to say the least. Personally I feel that eventually that IS going to happen. Unless you have massive faith in humanity to do the right thing in all cases and not abuse new systems?
 

Surkov

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Do they enquire as to whether you desire euthanasia before or after they give you the injection? :geek:
They will certainly write down on a form that they asked before. Unless the 'care centre' is below target, and then the forms will start to specify 'after'. :devilish:
 

Mercurial

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Cool. Any adult of sound mind should of course have the right to choose when and how they die.
 

recedite

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Quality of life is what counts, not length of life. Doctors have become very good at keeping people alive - maybe too good.
There is no point dragging it out for longer than your natural lifespan. Not for people who are barely existing. Unfortunately current and future generations are going to be faced with too much choice.
Choices that previous generations did not have, and usually did not need. Nature used to just take its course, but not any more.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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My plan if faced with serious illness which could drag on and wear down close family is to head for Switzerland, the Dignitas clinic, and a pint of morphine with a lemonade top.

Won't be asking any court or authorities for their opinion either. Autonomy or nothing.
 

Surkov

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Quality of life is what counts, not length of life. Doctors have become very good at keeping people alive - maybe too good.
There is no point dragging it out for longer than your natural lifespan. Not for people who are barely existing. Unfortunately current and future generations are going to be faced with too much choice.
Choices that previous generations did not have, and usually did not need. Nature used to just take its course, but not any more.
If you get invasive cancer with a 1% chance of recovery, then, despite very poor quality if life during treatment, you endure it in pursuit of a greater length of life. Even if there is a 0.001% chance of a cure within a few years, you have to fight, no?

You will be dead for long enough!

That's why life is so precious.

As for 'nature used to take it's course'. Doctor's can still consult you in relation to revival.

At the end of the day it is still suicide. Some can use euphemisms like 'assisted dying' but suicide is suicide. And it is the opposite of painless for those left behind.

My plan if faced with serious illness which could drag on and wear down close family is to head for Switzerland, the Dignitas clinic, and a pint of morphine with a lemonade top.

Won't be asking any court or authorities for their opinion either. Autonomy or nothing.
Your family will stand by you because they love you. Would you not do the same for them? How would you feel if the shoe was on the other foot, and someone was giving up because they didn't want you to be inconvenienced?
 

Emily Davison

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If you get invasive cancer with a 1% chance of recovery, then, despite very poor quality if life during treatment, you endure it in pursuit of a greater length of life. Even if there is a 0.001% chance of a cure within a few years, you have to fight, no?

You will be dead for long enough!

That's why life is so precious.

As for 'nature used to take it's course'. Doctor's can still consult you in relation to revival.

At the end of the day it is still suicide. Some can use euphemisms like 'assisted dying' but suicide is suicide. And it is the opposite of painless for those left behind.



Your family will stand by you because they love you. Would you not do the same for them? How would you feel if the shoe was on the other foot, and someone was giving up because they didn't want you to be inconvenienced?
It’s none of your business to dictate to other people what level of pain they must endure, not your business to tell other people that their quality of life is ok.

I’ll be trusting my family to carry out my instructions as regards euthanasia.
 

Emily Davison

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Looks like the next stage in the elimination of the Irish People is now being launched as the ultra liberal Journal does a poll showing 81% of respondents support Euthanasia

So, today we want to know: Would you support the legalisation of euthanasia in Ireland?


Poll Results:


Yes (894)



No (143)



I'm not sure / no opinion (63)



?height=400&version=4892728.jpg

Poll: Would you support the legalisation of euthanasia in Ireland?
Yesterday, New Zealand lawmakers voted in favour of making euthanasia legal.

www.thejournal.ie
www.thejournal.ie





I should imagine most of their readership are young upwardly mobile hipster types who swallow whole what they are told.

Of course what the supporters of Euthanasia fail to understand is that while it may at 1st be voluntary

- eventually it will be expected of you to avail of it....

About the time this lot start to pop their clogs!
Yep it’s the young upwardly mobile hipster types. Of course it is.
 

raetsel

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A friend of mine died a couple of months ago from cancer, and suffered a lot of pain during his final months. He declined treatment to prolong his life citing "quality of life" considerations as his reason.
I was happy for him when the end came.
I'd want the option to choose my time of death in the event of facing excruciating pain in my final weeks or months.
It is ironic that we have the right to choose this humane option for the pets we love as much as fellow humans but not for ourselves.
 

midlander12

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My plan if faced with serious illness which could drag on and wear down close family is to head for Switzerland, the Dignitas clinic, and a pint of morphine with a lemonade top.

Won't be asking any court or authorities for their opinion either. Autonomy or nothing.
Yep, same here.
 


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